Detroit's Tall Tale

Detroit to host Michigan’s tallest building at former Hudson’s site

Architecture Midwest News
Bedrock and SHoP Architects have released new renderings for the former Hudson's site. (Courtesy SHoP Architects/Bedrock)
Bedrock and SHoP Architects have released new renderings for the former Hudson's site. (Courtesy SHoP Architects/Bedrock)

The former Hudson’s site at 1206 Woodward Avenue in Detroit will soon be host to Michigan’s tallest building. Designed by SHoP Architects, the development will top off at 912 feet, tying One Prudential Plaza in Chicago for the title of the 32nd tallest building in the United States. Previously expected to rise to only 800 feet, the structure will be a full 200 feet taller than the Renaissance Center, Detroit’s current tallest.

SHoP’s newly released design drawings feature a stepped tower, scrapping the previous plans for an observation deck.

“Stepping allows for terraces for amenities and possible hospitality spaces,” said Bill Sharples of SHoP Architects on the updated plans. “The addition of new programming in the latest iteration of the design allowed us as architects and designers to break down the scale of the tower even further, and to approach it even more holistically, something we have been conscious of since the beginning of the project.”

The 1.4 million square foot development, which includes a twelve-story podium structure in addition to the tower, will be mixed use. The podium will house office, event, and exhibition space, while the tower will house hotel and residential units. Seven hundred parking spaces will be located within an underground garage. The development intends to link retail on Woodward Avenue with cultural destinations near the Detroit Public Library.

Bedrock LLC was chosen as the developer in 2013 via an invited completion to study the potential to develop the former site of the flagship J.L. Hudson department store, and the firm has developed the site along with SHoP and Hamilton Anderson Associates of Detroit. The project will be partially financed through tax breaks to Bedrock via the Michigan Strategic Fund, as well as the MIThrive Initiative. The structure intended for the Hudson’s site is one of four in the works for Bedrock that will be working with these programs.

Built in stages from 1911 to 1946, the Hudson’s flagship building on Woodward Avenue was once the tallest department store in the world at 25 stories. The store closed in 1983 and the building was demolished in 1998. A portion of the basement of the original structure was used for parking at the site until Bedrock broke ground on the new structure in December 2017.

The new structure is not expected to show any verticality for another fourteen months.

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