But It's Farley From Over

New renderings revealed as Moynihan Train Hall reaches major construction milestone

City Terrain East Transportation
New renderings as Moynihan Train Hall reaches major construction milestone. Pictured here: Passengers will have access to nine platforms and 17 tracks at the new station. (SOM/Image via New York State Governor's Office)
New renderings as Moynihan Train Hall reaches major construction milestone. Pictured here: Passengers will have access to nine platforms and 17 tracks at the new station. (SOM/Image via New York State Governor's Office)

Moynihan Station today, 10:45 a.m. – Dramatic stage lighting in New York colors illuminates bare steel trusses, a backdrop to the podium where the governor will talk up the new train hall, any minute now. Tables in the far back of the room, behind a crowd of hundreds of construction workers and sweaty guys in suits, are loaded with Penn-Farley coasters and free cider donuts. It’s humid, dark, and a little dusty, but despite the large gathering, there was just a little news at the former post office today: The project’s about to start full-on construction.

Governor Andrew Cuomo was in the city to announce a construction milestone at the Penn-Farley complex, the soon-to-be bigger and (hopefully) better train station on Manhattan’s West Side. This was the last time the James A. Farley Post Office, re-christened as the Moynihan Train Hall, will be open to the public before it’s transformed into a transit hub by SOM. Contractors had just knocked out the McKim Meade and White–designed hall’s second-floor mezzanine, a move that allows the major interior build-out to begin.

Interior rendering of Moynihan Train Hall. (SOM/Image via New York State Governor's Office)

Interior rendering of Moynihan Train Hall. (SOM/Image via New York State Governor’s Office)

In June, the Empire State Development Corporation (ESD) inked a $1.6 billion deal with a developer-builder team to transform the structure into a retail-office complex and train station. The three companies—Related Companies, Skanska, and Vornado Realty Trust—will contribute the largest share ($630 million) towards the project, with New York State kicking in $550 million. Money from Amtrak, the MTA, the Port Authority of New York & New Jersey, and federal grants round out the project costs.



The 255,000-square-foot station will serve Long Island Rail Road and Amtrak riders. Like the World Trade Center Oculus, or its slightly older cousin at Fulton Center, Moynihan’s skylit concourse will be ringed by retail, more than 700,000 square feet of it. To make transfers easier, the just-completed West End Concourse will connect Moynihan to Penn Station, just across 8th Avenue. Construction began in September and the train hall is expected to be complete in 2021.

Rendering of the exterior. (SOM/Image via New York State Governor's Office)

Rendering of the exterior. (SOM/Image via New York State Governor’s Office)

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