The annual December Miami art week has come to a close and the dealers, collectors, and artists have packed up their wares and headed home for another year.

The centerpiece fair Art Basel, its next door tented neighbor Design Miami, and the nearly twenty other shows will likely be already thinking about 2017. But for the collectors and audience, it’s also time to go through our telephone camera images and remember what stood out and still looks good a day later on a computer screen. There are, of course, scores of art and design works at these fairs to interest an architect who wants to be inspired, educated, or seduced by visual eye candy. In retrospect, the objects and images that stood out to an architect’s eye are really too numerous to mention but here are few highlights worth spending more time reviewing.

The best single image to this architect’s eye was surely Thomas Struth’s chromogenic print Schaltwerk 1 (2016) from Berlin at Marian Goodman Gallery, but there were dozens of other photographs that stood out, including Gordon Parks’s Untitled, Mobile (1956) that depicts a sign reading “For Sale Lots for Colored…” and Nicola Lopez’s photo and hand-drawn image on a wall of an imaginary building rising like a modern totem. The print image that most fits the dark fears of today’s racial conflict is perhaps James Casebere’s Vestibule (2016) for Sean Kelly Gallery; the object that raises the potential of playful fears is from Austrian Erwin Wurm in his Fat House Moller/Adolf Loos (2013) from Cristina Guerre Gallery.

This year’s fair had few sculptural objects for an architect’s enjoyment, but American Brutalism (1978) by Marlon de Azambuja from Brazil (where he was “brought up in a place of full-scale utopias”) is different. It takes architectural “thinking and building” and creates a small scale megastructure of industrial blocks and clamps. It reminds us how powerful the connection between art and architecture can and should be in the gallery and real world.

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