Posts tagged with "Design Miami":

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Architecture abounds at Design Miami 2017

The 14th edition of Design Miami will take place in Miami Beach from December 6-10, 2017, with a series of gallery highlights, auxiliary events, and design curios that will highlight architectural elements and lesser-known pieces from designers both old and new. Highlights include a solo show of furniture designed by Swiss architect Albert Frey for his own Palm Springs home, completed in 1949; a dining table by Chinese architect Ma Yansong of MAD, part of his MAD Martian collection, and an immersive “Isolation Sphere” by French architect Maurice-Claude Vidili from 1971.

New York’s Patrick Parrish Gallery has collaborated with MIT’s Self Assembly Lab to present a series of experimental robotic fabrication displays, including a 3-D calligraphy process that makes objects in a gel suspension. Salon 94 will show a monumental 11.5-foot-tall concrete bench titled Core by London-based designer Philippe Malouin. Clothing brand COS brings their successful Milan bubble installation to Miami this year, this time titled “New Spring Miami.”

The annual Panerai Design Miami/ Visionary Award goes to Mwabwindo School, a collaborative educational project in Zambia by Joseph Mizzi’s 14+ Foundation. The project is designed by Selldorf Architects and will feature original artwork by Rashid Johnson and newly-commissioned furniture by Christ & Gantenbein.

Other talks that are part of Design Miami include  about queer space with Rafael de Cardenas and Aaron Betsky, and “Spatializing Blackness,” with USC architecture dean Milton S.F. Curry, architect Sir David Adjaye, artist/designer Amanda Williams, artist Hank Willis Thomas, and Watts House Project cofounder Edgar Arceneaux.

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Take a look at Swarovski Designers of the Future installation for Design Miami/Basel

  Swarovski has completed work on its 2017 Swarovski Designers of the Future Award installation featuring design contributions from designers Jimenez Lai, Marjan van Aubel, and TAKT PROJECT for this year’s Design Miami / Basel expositions. Each of the award winner’s contribution to the group installation utilizes Swarovski’s namesake crystals as a way of generating innovative applications of new technologies. van Aubel’s installation, a “future cyanometer,” uses Swarovski crystals and sunlight to power a blue light. TAKT PROJECT utilizes 3D-printed crystals to make tabletop objects while Lai’s installation repurposes rejected Swarovski crystals as slag for a series of geometric terrazzo volumes. In a press release announcing the installation, Lai said, “design for me is all about telling stories. Being able to truly understand the rich history of Swarovski through my visit to Wattens was crucial to creating an installation that reaches both back in time, but also into our future. Second quality crystals are an entirely new material for us to work with, and we’re delighted to have been able to create an innovative surface that sparkles and shines to bring the outside in.” The recipients were commissioned to create these installations as a part of the 2017 Design Miami / Basel expositions and are being displayed collectively. The installation debuted in Basel, Switzerland earlier this week and will be on view through June 18th, 2017.
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Jimenez Lai, Marjan van Aubel, and TAKT PROJECT given 2017 Swarovski Designers of the Future Award

Swarovski and Design Miami/ have named designers Jimenez Lai, Marjan van Aubel and TAKT PROJECT as the winners of the 2017 Swarovski Designers of the Future Award. The award, according to a press release, will help the designers advance innovative projects within their individual fields with the aim of developing a “new prototype or design statement that is inspired or informed by crystal.” The recipients have been commissioned to create new work for exhibition at the 2017 Design Miami / Basel art showcase occurring later this year in Switzerland. Though each of the winners will work on a separate project, the works of all three designers will be exhibited in a singular installation generally focused around the uses of new technologies. Los Angeles-based Lai—founder of design firm Bureau Spectacular—will focus on exploring design through storytelling in order to create a surface-based installation. Lai will also strive to create an overall architectural character for the installation. In the press release, Lai said, “I’m excited to bring an architectural perspective to this year’s installation. Working with crystal is a stimulating new challenge as it creates a visual quality that is unlike most other materials designers normally use.” Lai referred his project as a "terrazzo palazzo" at an awards lunch, saying, "I mapped out how much time I spent on various activities throughout the day—eating, sleeping, sitting, etc.—and translated that amount of time into proportions for the design. So, for example, since the vast majority of my time is spent sitting, the majority of the structure can be used for sitting." Lai added that he would re-use the imperfect Swarovski crystals sorted out of production during quality control inspections for his palazzo, saying, "If we think about 'reduce, reuse, recycle,' it actually costs more energy to recycle than reuse. With that in mind, I wanted to take the crystals that were not selected and make a terrazzo. It's a very malleable architectural product." Tokyo-based TAKT PROJECT will partner with glass 3D-printing company MICRON3DP to produce tabletop objects made of 3D-printed Swarovski crystals. When describing the project, Satoshi Yoshiizuofmi of TAKT PROJECT focused on the innovative aspects of the work, saying, "It's a completely new technology, so the process is very exciting and very experimental." And London-based Marjan van Aubel will develop so-called “living light objects” in collaboration with Swarovski’s in-house solar technology experts. At the same awards lunch, van Aubel said, "We are going to take the light from the sky and bring it inside using solar crystals. As a designer, I am really interested in using solar technology and making it more aesthetically pleasing and more integrated." For more information on 2017 Design Miami / Basel, see the showcase website.
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Top picks from Miami’s art and design week

The annual December Miami art week has come to a close and the dealers, collectors, and artists have packed up their wares and headed home for another year. The centerpiece fair Art Basel, its next door tented neighbor Design Miami, and the nearly twenty other shows will likely be already thinking about 2017. But for the collectors and audience, it’s also time to go through our telephone camera images and remember what stood out and still looks good a day later on a computer screen. There are, of course, scores of art and design works at these fairs to interest an architect who wants to be inspired, educated, or seduced by visual eye candy. In retrospect, the objects and images that stood out to an architect's eye are really too numerous to mention but here are few highlights worth spending more time reviewing. The best single image to this architect's eye was surely Thomas Struth’s chromogenic print Schaltwerk 1 (2016) from Berlin at Marian Goodman Gallery, but there were dozens of other photographs that stood out, including Gordon Parks's Untitled, Mobile (1956) that depicts a sign reading “For Sale Lots for Colored…” and Nicola Lopez’s photo and hand-drawn image on a wall of an imaginary building rising like a modern totem. The print image that most fits the dark fears of today's racial conflict is perhaps James Casebere’s Vestibule (2016) for Sean Kelly Gallery; the object that raises the potential of playful fears is from Austrian Erwin Wurm in his Fat House Moller/Adolf Loos (2013) from Cristina Guerre Gallery. This year's fair had few sculptural objects for an architect's enjoyment, but American Brutalism (1978) by Marlon de Azambuja from Brazil (where he was “brought up in a place of full-scale utopias”) is different. It takes architectural “thinking and building” and creates a small scale megastructure of industrial blocks and clamps. It reminds us how powerful the connection between art and architecture can and should be in the gallery and real world.
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Celebrating handmade art at day three of Design Miami/

The Architect's Newspaper is reporting on day three of Design Miami/ from the Untitled, Art tent on Ocean Drove and 12th street. There you can find art for the everyman; prices are in the range of affordable or only slightly out of reach. But the show also has many examples of industrial design or work created by artists who fall into the space between art and architecture, or even urbanism. One obvious quality of much of the best work at Untitled, Art is the element of craft or the handmade that is frankly absent in most of both the early 20th century objects or the luxury products made for the .001%. For example, here at Untitled, Art handicraft is celebrated by Toronto's MKG127 Gallery, who's displaying handmade and painted wooden objects by Roula Partheniou. Her designs feature colorful paint brushes (with handmade wooden nails for hanging on walls) and small tools, also for wall installation. Craft and qualities of the handmade are still alive and being brought back into the marketplace in art fairs but not by artists by industrial designers.  
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Le Corbusier, Gerrit Rietveld, Rem Koolhaas, and more, from day two of Design Miami/

The second day of Design Miami/ meant going back to look closer at objects and images that stood out from yesterday's run through the tent. This show, unlike its hulking Miami neighbor Art Basel, is small and approachable but hard to describe in words. It has a few beautiful high design objects that were likely shown at Milan's Salone del Mobile earlier this year, a great many expensive and playful baubles meant for children or grownups into S&M, and finally classic pieces of furniture from the masters of twentieth-century architecture and design. In fact, Design Miami is a show that does not know what it wants to be and ends up being a cross between Milan’s Triennale and Salone del Mobile, Paris's Maison & Objet, and the Park Avenue antique show. It’s most pleasant surprise is the number of exhibitors, mostly outliers in the fair world, who come from the southern hemisphere. For example, the gallery Southern Guild is based in South Africa and has the most outrageous (and best designed) bauble at the fair: a green leather hanging fish chair with floppy, pointed teeth designed by the group Porky Hefer. But like last year's Miami fair, it is the galleries in Paris, Rotterdam, and Brussels, etc., that have the most magnificent classic objects and remnants from the period of early modernism. Gallery 1950 from New York showed a magnificent Roger Tallon-designed 1970 dining suite (“Module 400” series) featuring a table with glass top supported on four cast aluminum pedestal bases, with six chairs with egg crate foam seat and back. They also had an industrial metal Isamu Noguchi tabletop sculpture named Cactus Wind. Galerie Patrick Seguin, like last year, showed furniture by Jean Prouvé, Le Corbusier, Pierre Jeanneret, Charlotte Perriand, and Jean Royere. The star of their booth was a 1955 Prouvé worktable of plated wood, green stainless steel, and aluminum. They also displayed several Prouvé prefabricated walls that they have inlaid into a sheet rock wall. Another French gallery, LAFFANOUR / Galerie Downtown, showed two magnificent tapestries by Le Corbusier and Jean Lurcat made in 1965. Finally, Galerie VIVID from Rotterdam had original scuffed furniture by Gerrit Rietveld and prints by Rem Koolhaas, El Lissitzky, and Rietveld. In the end, it reminds us why these architect-designed objects are important to history and not just the marketplace.
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The largest 3D printed object in the world, and more from day one of Design Miami/

It’s day one of the annual Miami art and design fairs and The Architect's Newspaper (AN) is back for another year. Today we are in the smaller Design Miami/ tent across the street from the gigantic Art Basel fair. This design fair is usually a mix of a few international prototypes by the world's best designers, lots of frilly and useless baubles like beaded fantasy animals and chairs meant for adult children, and finally original pieces by classic designers like Jean Prouvé, Le Corbusier, George Nakashima, and even Gaetano Pesce. If one knows what they like, the entire fair can be seen in 30 minutes. As in the past, the Design Miami/ tent is fronted by a small pavilion or folly, and this year SHoP Architects have created one of the best pavilions in recent memory. Titled Flotsam & Jetsam, SHoP worked to create the installation with Branch Technology, a Chattanooga-based fabrication firm, Dassault Systems, for project management, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, who provided a second 3D printing material technology (a biodegradable bamboo medium) for the surrounding seating. (Learn more about the installation, the largest 3D printed object in the world, in our prior coverage.) After Design Miami/, Flotsam & Jetsam will be reinstalled in the Miami Design District’s iconic Jungle Plaza to house an outdoor cultural event space for long-term public enjoyment. The space will be launched with the Institute of Contemporary Art, Miami on December 1, 2017. Inside the design tent, there was little that was new but a few items stood out: Konstantin Grcic’s limited edition chair/table he calls Hieronymus Minero in the Galerie Kreo booth, along with his glass and metal table with funny rubber wires coming from its black frame. The best lighting design came from The Future Perfect with their aptly named Floor Double Loop by designer Michael Anastassiades. Carpenters Workshop Gallery also showed a clever and beautiful glass ceiling light named Les Cordes by Mathieu Lehanneur. Finally, South Africa’s Southern Guild presented their Num Num bronze and glass dining table. The standouts of the fair—and some are stunning—are the classic 20th century pieces and we will present them in a separate post.
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AN Exclusive: First look at Airbnb and Pedro&Juana’s Design Miami installation

Two design worlds will collide this year in Miami as the Mexico City-based design duo Pedro&Juana will debut Sobremesa, an interactive installation created for Design Miami/ in collaboration with Airbnb. The translucent house-like structure will serve as a gathering space that will be a hub for the duration of Design Miami/. Visitors are invited to socialize and to collaborate on the completion of the space, as anyone can add to it with a series of colorful tiles. The interior space of Sobramesa will be filled with objects and artisan pieces from Mexico City, sourced by Pedro&Juana and designed by locals. Sobramesa will be connected to an outdoor space, blending indoor and outdoor living—a tradition in both Miami and Mexico City Literally translated as ‘over the table,’ “sobremesa” is a concept, deeply rooted in Mexican culture, that loosely translates as the indeterminate amount of time people spend together lingering around a table after a meal to share in casual conversation. “The Mexican idea of ‘sobremesa’ is about not rushing but instead enjoying shared company and connecting on a personal level,” said Mecky Reuss, co-founder of Pedro&Juana. “It is something special to Mexican and Spanish culture that can be enjoyed by people everywhere.” Pedro&Juana will host a series of “sobremesas” in the space during the week, where they will invite visitors to share in meals, cocktails, and music at designated times. In addition, the designers will curate a playlist with Mexico City-based musicians including Trio Martino, Rulo, Los Shajatos, Sonido Changorama, and NAAFI, among others. “A lot of our work examines social spaces and how individuals interact with the built environment,” said Ana Paula Ruiz Galindo, co-founder of Pedro&Juana. “Working with Airbnb on this project is a great opportunity for us to build on this experience while also exploring elements of our home city, Mexico City.” Sobremesa is the latest in Airbnb’s collaborations with up-and-coming designers from around the world, exploring the concepts of domesticity, gathering, and shared living. Past projects include Sugi No Ie (Yoshino Cedar House) (Yoshino, August 2016), Makers and Bakers (Milan, April 2016), belong. here. now. (Miami, December 2015), Housewarming (Milan, April 2015), and A Place Called Home (London, September 2014). “What excites me about a project like this is that we can apply what we learn from it to the larger Airbnb experience,” said Joe Gebbia, CPO & Co-Founder of Airbnb. “Working with emerging designers like Pedro&Juana and giving them free reign to explore concepts around travel and sharing is enormously beneficial for us. Having a background in design myself, I am always curious to see how other designers think and what unique perspectives and insight they’ll bring to our brand.” Sobremesa will be on view at Design Miami/ November 30-December 4, 2016. Meridian Avenue & 19th Street Adjacent to the Miami Beach Convention Center Miami Beach, FL
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Ole Scheeren and Dean & Deluca look to reinvent the grocery store experience

What happens when an architect reinterprets the grocery experience? We will find out at Design Miami/ on November 30th when German-born architect Ole Scheeren unveils “Stage,” a collaboration with Dean & DeLuca, the legendary New York gourmet market and leading international purveyor of fine food. The temporary setup will act as a prototype for a new retail experience that will be “a glowing, pristine object in polished stainless steel with the undulating topography of a bespoke, high-tech display system, created for the powerful celebration of the preparation and presentation of food.” German-born architect Ole Scheeren is internationally renowned for his highly innovative work. Scheeren designed the Prada Epicentres in New York and Los Angeles, and the remarkable CCTV media headquarters in Beijing when he was a partner at OMA. Now at the helm of Büro Ole Scheeren, he has recently completed The Interlace, lauded World Building of the Year 2015, and Mahanakhon, Thailand’s tallest skyscraper. With Scheeren’s much anticipated Guardian Art Centre in Beijing and the DUO towers in Singapore due to open in 2017, he is currently working on multiple new projects across Europe, Asia, and North America. Known for his uncompromising practice and critical thinking, Ole Scheeren has now applied his approach to large-scale work towards the development of a unique food retail concept for Dean & DeLuca. Scheeren's Stage prototype will be on display from November 30 to December 4 in the main exhibition tent of Design Miami/ and will operate throughout the duration of the fair as its main and sole food partner. Dean & DeLuca originated in 1977 when Joel Dean, Giorgio Deluca, and Jack Ceglic opened their first grocery store in an industrial space on Prince Street in Soho, New York. Back in 2014, the company was acquired by Sorapoj Techakraisri, CEO of Bangkok, Thailand-based PACE Development.
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Designers use crystals for multisensory installations at Design Miami

In a recent Swarovski-sponsored competition for Design Miami, designers were tasked with using crystal to contemplate the “quality of interaction between people and design.” The three winning projects—whose works are listed below—all have a unique take on crystalline design. The first designer, Anjali Srinivasan, was inspired by “human gesture.” She created a wave of small crystals and glass pieces that are illuminated by touch-activated LEDs. The wave is 5.24 feet in width and 6 inches length. There are 5,000 glass pieces paired alongside 3,000 Swarovski crystals; 1,500 crystals can illuminate when touched. The second installation, by Studio Brynjar & Veronika, shows “natural light in conversation with crystal.” Several sticks made with crystal, along with other refractive surfaces, all interact with light to cast delicate shadows. The third installation is by sound artist Yuri Suzuki and it explores the acoustic qualities of crystals. Suzuki created a device that plays crystals of different sizes: by hitting them with metal, a pure resonant sound is created.
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Kengo Kuma designs malleable pavilion for Design Miami

Japanese architect Kengo Kuma has designed a billowing geometric pavilion for the Phillipe Gravier Gallery at the biannual Design Miami/Basel 2016 design forum. Called Owan, Kuma's pavilion aims to establish a dialogue between architecture and the landscape by employing an undulating mesh-like structural shell. Owan's design also derives from the curvature often found in fish scales and traditional tea bowls from Kuma's homeland. The pavilion's shell can be altered, changing its relationship to the site and its interior dimensions. Though appearing porous, Owan is lined with a thin waterproof membrane that can move in the wind along with the lightweight structure. https://vimeo.com/164417666 In the video above, you can see how the structure responds to light. Given the structure's intended natural environment, the trajectory of the sun should play in important role in the pavilion's performance. Design Miami/ (June 14 - 19) is a forum that has a strong pedigree in the world of design collectables. Kuma’s Owan will be presented at the forum's “Design at Large,” which will also exhibit further large-scale installations under the theme of "tea house," notably Ron Arad’s Armadillo Tea Canopy by Revolution Precrafted.
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Designer envisions a Miami Beach that embraces the rising sea

This year's Art Basel/Design Miami was a wash. The tallest stilettos could not save feet from floodwaters that inundated streets and forced partygoers under small tents. Even when it's not raining, water bubbles up through stormwater grates and sewers, a result of the city's porous limestone bedrock. Miami Beach is a barrier island that is routinely battered by hurricanes and floods. With global warming, the bad floods will only get worse. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, NASA, and NOAA predict sea level rise between eight inches and six feet by 2100. For these reasons, Harvard GSD's newly established Design Office for Urbanization selected Miami Beach as its first focus site. Though unaffiliated with Harvard, a recent Florida architecture grad would make a great contribution to the program. Designer Isaac Stein, at West 8's New York office, envisions a solution for incorporating rising seas into Miami Beach's urban design, Vanity Fair reports. While completing an undergraduate degree in architecture at the University of Miami, Stein drafted a plan for a mangrove forest, raised buildings, canals, and other design interventions that will bend to, not fight, the rising seas. The plan focuses on South Beach proper, from 5th to 15th Streets. One of Miami Beach's main thoroughfares, Alton Road, would be raised on stilts to accomodate floodwater. Trams would replace cars, and bike lanes would be installed along Washington Avenue, roughly parallel to and a few blocks inland from the Atlantic. Historically, Miami Beach's western (bay) side was lined with mangroves. Stein's plan restores the mangrove forest to provide a natural buffer against rising water. Canals would be cut in the medians Michigan, Jefferson, and Lenox Avenues. The resulting fill could be used to raise buildings and roads 1.5 feet above grade, would safeguard the city against six feet of sea level rise.