The Architect’s Newspaper (AN)’s inaugural 2013 Best of Design Awards featured six categories. Since then, it’s grown to 26 exciting categoriesAs in years past, jury members (Erik Verboon, Claire Weisz, Karen Stonely, Christopher Leong, Adrianne Weremchuk, and AN’s Matt Shaw) were picked for their expertise and high regard in the design community. They based their judgments on evidence of innovation, creative use of new technology, sustainability, strength of presentation, and, most importantly, great design. We want to thank everyone for their continued support and eagerness to submit their work to the Best of Design Awards. We are already looking forward to growing next year’s coverage for you.

2016 Building of the Year > West: San Francisco Museum of Modern Art Expansion

Architect: Snøhetta
Location: San Francisco, CA

The expansion of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art reimagines SFMOMA as a new art experience and gateway into the city of San Francisco. Snøhetta integrated the building with the existing Mario Botta design from 1995, while making the museum more accessible than ever, tripling the amount of exhibition space and expanding the public gallery and outdoor areas. Seeking to engage with the community in a proactive way, the addition opens up new routes of public circulation through the South of Market neighborhood and into the museum.

General Contractor
Webcor Builders

Facade Contractor
Enclos

Lighting and Facade Engineering

Arup

Structural Engineering
Magnusson Klemencic Associates

FRP Fabricators
Kreysler & Associates

Graphic Perf® Entry Panels
Arktura

Washington-Fruit_KS_015

(Courtesy Kevin Scott)

Honorable Mention: Building of the Year > West: Washington Fruit & Produce Co. Office Headquarters

Architect: Graham Baba Architects
Location: Yakima, WA

Washington-Fruit_KS_021

(Courtesy Kevin Scott)

Tucked behind landforms and site walls, this courtyard-focused office complex provides a serene refuge from the noise and activity of nearby fruit packing warehouses. Taking cues from an aging barn, the building is light and open with a muted palette, reclaimed wood siding, and a rooted connection to the land.

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