Posts tagged with "Best Of Design Awards":

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There's only one month left to enter Archpaper's 2019 Best of Design Awards

Don't wait until it's too late to enter the 2019 AN Best of Design Awards. There's only one month left until the October 4 deadline, so begin (or complete) your submissions today! With 50 comprehensive categories to choose from, there are more chances to win than ever before. This a great opportunity to make sure your latest completed, unbuilt, speculative, and research-based projects receive the recognition they deserve. Our esteemed jury, comprised of New Affiliates Co-Founder Jaffer Kolb; Selldorf Architects partner Sara Lopergolo; Skidmore, Owings & Merrill associate director Carlos Madrid III; The Architectural League of New York program director Anne Rieselbach; The Architect’s Newspaper executive editor Matt Shaw; and Oana Stănescu Studio founder Oana Stănescu, will select the best Canadian, Mexican, and US building, interior, installation, representation, renovation, public, urban, and student projects. Winners, Honorable Mentions, and Editor's Picks in all 50 categories will be announced in the special end-of-year Best of Design magazine, in dedicated articles on Archpaper.com and ANInteriormag.com, and extensively on our social media platforms. Winners will also receive a signed limited edition poster by famous radical architecture collective Archigram. Categories
  • Adaptive Reuse
  • Restoration & Preservation
  • Building Renovation — Single-Unit
  • Building Renovation — Multi-Unit
  • Building Renovation — Commercial
  • Building Renovation — Civic
  • Architectural Lighting — Indoor
  • Architectural Lighting — Outdoor
  • Architectural Representation — Analog
  • Architectural Representation — Digital
  • Cultural
  • Public
  • Education
  • Healthcare
  • Commercial — Hospitality
  • Commercial — Office
  • Commercial — Retail + Mixed Use
  • Digital Fabrication
  • Facades
  • Green Building
  • Infrastructure
  • Interior — Institutional
  • Interior — Healthcare
  • Interior — Hospitality
  • Interior — Residential
  • Interior — Retail
  • Interior — Workplace
  • Landscape — Residential
  • Landscape — Public
  • New Materials
  • Research
  • Residential — Multi-Unit
  • Residential — Single-Unit
  • Small Spaces
  • Temporary Installation
  • Exhibition Design
  • Unbuilt — Commercial
  • Unbuilt — Cultural
  • Unbuilt — Education
  • Unbuilt — Public
  • Unbuilt — Residential
  • Unbuilt — Urban Design
  • Unbuilt — Green
  • Unbuilt — Landscape
  • Unbuilt — Interior
  • Urban Design
  • Young Architects Award
  • Student Work — Individual
  • Student Work — Group
  • Student Work — Representation
Eligibility  In order for a project to be eligible for submission, it must have been completed within one year’s time of the submission deadline (October 2018). Landscape, Public, Unbuilt, and Representation projects must have been completed within two years time of the submission deadline (October 2017). The Best Of Design Awards are open to Canadian, Mexican, U.S. and international firms (e.g., architects/ designers/ consultants/ engineers/ manufacturers), but projects submitted must be located within Canada, Mexico, or The United States.
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Andrés Jaque offers an approach to "intersectional architecture"

Andrés Jaque is the founder of the New York and Madrid–based Office for Political Innovation. By exploring the expanded potential of architecture through both speculative and realized designs, the firm has received numerous accolades, including the 2015 MoMA/PS1 Young Architects Program and the 2016 Frederick Kiesler Prize for Architecture and the Arts. In 2014, Jaque’s SALES ODDITY: Milano 2 and the Politics of Direct-to-Home TV Urbanism garnered a 2014 Venice Architecture Biennale Silver Lion award. The 2011 IKEA Disobedients was the first “architectural performance” piece to enter the Museum of Modern Art’s collection. In this project, local residents were invited to hack IKEA furniture, and in doing so publicly perform their everyday private talents and determine their own lifestyles. The project suggests that not all people necessarily abide by the same normative principles or architectural dictates. Jaque is also the director of the Columbia University GSAPP postgraduate Advanced Architectural Design program.

As a member of this year’s AN Best of Design Awards jury, Jaque spoke to The Architect’s Newspaper contributor Adrian Madlener about the current state of architecture. 

The Architect’s Newspaper: What roles do architecture and urbanism play in addressing today’s global challenges?

Andrés Jaque: Architecture and urbanism have a responsibility to mediate some of the most pressing topics reshaping contemporary life: environmental degradation, mounting geopolitical tensions, and the articulation of physical and virtual worlds. There are three unavoidable facts facing society today: Climate change is forcing humanity to redefine how we engage with nature; technology is becoming increasingly autonomous, making it impossible for humanity to maintain control over its impact; and the evolving interaction society has with the offline and the online realms is blurring the distinction between what is real and what is virtual.

Attempting to set clear boundaries between these two realities requires a greater effort. Architecture plays an important role in all these issues. The field has a great capacity and responsibility in the making of facts catering to the collective sense of truth that all forces in society should now—more than ever—respect. Architecture is in the best disciplinary position it has ever been to shape the present and propose potential scenarios for the future.

AN: How can the discipline look to the past to inform the present?

AJ: As architects, we have to reflect on our practice, but also on our legacy. On one hand, we need to develop new ways to operate and respond to changing societal and environmental paradigms. On the other hand, we need to reconsider how we view our predecessors, how we understand and learn from architectural history. Just a few years ago, figures like Cedric Price, Lina Bo Bardi, the Ant Farm collective, and Frederick Kiesler were seen as marginal. Today, these unsung innovators are proving to be the best sources of information for tackling the field’s evolutionary challenges.

AN: You often say that architecture needs to incorporate knowledge from other disciplines. What are the benefits of this interdisciplinary approach?   

AJ: Architecture has the unique capacity to express different perspectives, materialities, temporalities, and scales in interventions charged with multiplicity. Whatever priorities we’re going to address, our response needs to be informed by different realities. Architecture is not an isolated practice. We have to consult other fields: science, art, technology, etcetera. In that way, the discourse around our discipline is becoming more intersectional. It’s important to understand that the design of a building or environment cannot just be accomplished with form and aesthetics alone. Different political, social, economic, and ecological implications need to be considered if a design is to be relevant. 

I defend the concept of intersectional architecture in my capacity as a practitioner and educator. My goal is to develop methodologies that can shift architecture’s interdependence on different realities into an opportunity to engage criticality and to intervene in many areas of contemporary life that are currently being disputed.

AN: Do any of your current projects exemplify the concept of intersectional architecture?

AJ: At Office for Political Innovation, we’re currently designing an experimental school. The project obliges us to simultaneously consider the daily life of its students, but also the larger context that they will occupy. On a larger scale, we’re actually structuring an ecosystem that addresses its own consumption. This aspect will also become an important resource when teaching the students about sustainability. 

We’re also currently designing a house on one of the outer islands near Corpus Christi, Texas. Our proposal offers solutions on different levels. On one hand, it’ll serve as a getaway for a Dallas-based family; on the other, it’ll collect fresh rainfall to irrigate the surrounding mangrove—an important line of defense that can combat erosion and rising sea levels. The house can accommodate the owner’s almost hedonistic desires while still ensuring the survival of its surroundings. What we’re realizing in our practice is that architecture needs to simultaneously cater to different realities within a single response. A design has the ability to address often disparate elements and perspectives.

AN: From your experience as a cocurator of 2018’s Manifesta 12 biennial in Palermo, Italy, how do you think art practice influences the way we imagine and/or create cities?

AJ: Palermo is not a city but rather a hub for the stratified relationships that tie it to distant places like sub-Saharan West Africa, Bangladesh, and the United States. These connections occur through the flow of capital and investment—that dispute the future of the city’s built environment—but also the nearby military base that foreign powers use to strike the Middle East and northern Africa. Palermo’s architecture, the dialectic between its role on a local and global level, has proved to be ineffectual in dealing with these transnational interactions.

In this scenario, architecture and art are the only disciplines that can bring heterogeneous situations together. Whether it’s the migration crisis or a personal struggle, these realities simultaneously develop on different scales. Architecture and art can mediate the evolution of these realities by introducing the values of urbanity, new forms of citizenship, and the aesthetics of inclusivity. This can only happen if such interventions take stock of what is already in place and grasp the full scope of complexity that the context might contain. To be truly impactful, the initiatives must cater to all parts rather than just the most powerful elements. An open cultural platform like the Manifesta art biennial offers architects and artists the space to test out independent action that the urgency of commercial commissions rarely provides. 

AN: How is architecture education changing?

AJ: Within the Advanced Architectural Design Program that I direct at Columbia University, students—who already have significant experience with design as a critical medium—explore new forms of practice in different contexts. They gain an analytical understanding that will allow them to intervene and apply architecture as a contemporary methodology. Various speculative exercises allow them to test out how the field could have a wider scope of influence in the future. They don’t learn a predetermined set of skills, but rather work together and with faculty to reinvent architecture as a discipline that can respond to the world’s greatest problems. 

It is crucial that they are able to translate this discursive approach when entering or reentering the profession. In our program, we’re trying to change architectural education by introducing an experimental pedagogy. Students are given the time and space to develop situated projects that address specific, real-world briefs. With its many firms, experts, advocacy agencies, and organizations, New York offers the perfect context for these investigations.

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2018 Best of Design Awards winners for Unbuilt — Landscape

2018 Best of Design Awards winner for Unbuilt – Landscape: Greers Ferry Water Garden Designer: University of Arkansas Community Design Center Location: Heber Springs, Arkansas Developed by the University of Arkansas Community Design Center, the Greers Ferry Water Garden proposal seeks to revive Edward Durell Stone’s forgotten plan for a water garden park. Contemporaneous with his design of the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C., the internationally renowned architect’s equally monumental park concept was set to accompany the Greers Ferry Dam in Heber Springs, Arkansas. Stone’s design deployed late modernist tropes, combining monumentality and glamour throughout. However, his schematic vocabulary left gaps on matters of terrain passage, native planting, and water as an experiential medium. The updated vision offers a new environmental model for park design. Excess runoff collected through the dam’s impoundment of the river can be harvested and strategically recycled throughout the 269-acre water garden to grow new life and create higher-order niche ecologies. Honorable Mention Project name: Murchison Rogers Park Designer: Surroundings Location: El Paso, Texas
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2018 Best of Design Awards winners for Digital Fabrication

2018 Best of Design Award for Digital Fabrication: 260 Kent Designer: COOKFOX Architects Location: Brooklyn, New York

Slated to be the tallest tower in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, 260 Kent by COOKFOX Architects was designed using an innovative precast exterior concept inspired by the molecular structure of sugar crystals. In a unique collaboration between the architect, developer, and Gate Precast, the same BIM model that was used to design the facade and create early scaled 3D-printed models was utilized to print molds for the precast panels. When complete, the facade is intended to act as a shading element. Opening in fall 2019, the 42-story tower will join the already open 325 Kent and Domino Park as the latest edition to the Domino Sugar waterfront redevelopment project.

Honorable Mentions Project Name: A.V. Bath House Designer: Facilities Design Group Location: Custer, Michigan Project Name: MARS Pavilion Designer: Form Found Design Location: Los Angeles  
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2018 Best of Design Awards winners for New Materials

2018 Best of Design Award for New Materials: Cyclopean Cannibalism Designer: Matter Design Location: Seoul, South Korea

By translating an ancient method of masonry into a digital procedure, Matter Design developed Cyclopean Cannibalism as a sustainable alternative to the standard practice of landfilling demolition debris. This project illustrates how the carcasses of previous buildings could be reused as a new material. To do this, rubble is scanned and input into a digital algorithm that sorts random shapes. Each stonelike component is carved by a robotic arm and recomposed into a new construction. In today’s urban context, we generate unprecedented quantities of waste. In order to more intelligently reconsider existing building stock, the profession could learn from cyclopean construction. Can our future cities digest themselves?

Honorable Mentions Project Name: One Thousand Museum Designers: Zaha Hadid Architects and ODP Architects Location: Miami Project Name: Clastic Order Designer: T+E+A+M Location: San Francisco
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2018 Best of Design Awards winners for Temporary Installation

2018 Best of Design Award for Urban Design: Trickster Designers: studio:indigenous Location: Sheboygan, Wisconsin Designed by studio:indigenous, Trickster is an installation completed during a residency at the Bookworm Gardens in Sheboygan, Wisconsin. The piece is made of wood harvested on-site and patinated in copper mesh. The primal sculpture plays an important role in indigenous storytelling, which focuses more on animal forms and natural phenomena than on humans. The stories—and Trickster, by extension—are designed to encourage viewers to free their minds of all that complicates this world and examine their own flaws rooted in anthropocentric thinking. Observers are encouraged to tell their own stories based on how they experience Trickster. Honorable Mentions  Project Name: Blue Marble Circus Designer: DESIGN EARTH Location: Boston Project Name: 85 Broad Street Ground Mural Designer: FXCollaborative Location: New York
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2018 Best of Design Awards winners for Adaptive Reuse

2018 Best of Design Award winner for Urban Design: San Francisco Art Institute at Fort Mason Designer: Leddy Maytum Stacy Architects Location: San Francisco Located on the edge of San Francisco Bay, Fort Mason Pier 2 has been transformed from a historic army warehouse into a satellite campus for the San Francisco Art Institute (SFAI). This adaptive reuse project preserves the industrial integrity of the landmark concrete-and-steel structure while supporting the school’s pedagogical goals. The iconic shed was restored with an integrated sustainable building system, working with the existing building structure and materials. A photovoltaic solar system was mounted on the building’s gabled roof. The design interweaves the historic and contemporary, preserving the dramatic, light-filled industrial structure to create 160 studios, workshops, flexible teaching spaces, public galleries, and a media theater. Honorable Mentions  Project Name: Empire Stores Designer: S9 Architecture Location: Brooklyn, New York Project Name: Cristo Rey St. Martin College Prep Designer: JGMA Location: Waukegan, Illinois
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2018 Best of Design Awards winners for Building Renovation

2018 Best of Design Award winner for Building Renovation: 1217 Main Street Designer: 5G Studio Collaborative Location: Dallas

The remodeled 1217 Main Street building opened in December 2017 with a striking mosaic facade. Created by renowned Cuban-born artist Jorge Pardo, the 36,215 glazed ceramic tiles helped give new purpose to the 1950s-era bank as a multi-use commercial and office building. The unique facade was constructed with no visible control and expansion joints, panel or module seams, or shadow lines. The artist’s intent required that the building read as a single plane. The tile scheme continues through the interior of the ground floor, which houses a butcher, a bakery, and a commissary. 5G Studio Collaborative’s infrastructural intervention also included the addition of a floor, which added more office space to the mixed-use project. 1217 Main Street has become a new landmark and operates as a gateway to Dallas’s revitalized Main Street.

Honorable Mention Project Name: 1824 Sophie Wright Place Designer: studioWTA Location: New Orleans
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2018 Best of Design Awards winners for Restoration & Preservation

2018 Best of Design Award winner for Restoration & Preservation: 100 Barclay Designer: DXA Studio Location: New York

The legendary Barclay-Vesey Building has undergone an extensive conversion from an office into a residential building. Originally designed by AIA-designated “Architect of the Century” Ralph Walker of the firm McKenzie, Voorhees & Gmelin in the 1920s, DXA Studio has renovated the Art Deco tower’s exterior and lobby. The firm envisioned several remediation measures to the historic terraces and storefronts. Additionally, the landmarked lobby required an architectural device to separate commercial and residential tenants. The space called for a visually unobtrusive screening partition that respects the historical context without resorting to pastiche. The lobby lighting design is based on geometric patterns and motifs found throughout the building, notably the setbacks of the upper stories and the articulation of grapevines.

Honorable Mentions Project Name: Hotel Henry at the Richardson Olmsted Campus Designer: Deborah Berke Partners Location: Buffalo, New York Project Name: Using Digital Innovation to Preserve Taliesin West Designer: Leica Geosystems, Multivista, and Matterport Location: Scottsdale, Arizona
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2018 Best of Design Awards winners for Research

2018 Best of Design Awards winner for Research: Stalled! Designer: JSA Stalled! is a design-research project by Joel Sanders Architects (JSA) in collaboration with Susan Stryker and Terry Kogan that responds to the national debate about transgender access to public restrooms. The speculative design addresses the need for safe, sustainable, and inclusive restrooms. While most debates consider this as solely a transgender rights issue, this project casts a wider net by developing inclusive guidelines that take all people into consideration. Using this inclusive design methodology, JSA created three viable and economical prototypes for inclusive facilities for new construction projects or retrofitting. A generic airport version reconceives the restroom as a semi-open agora, animated by three parallel activity zones dedicated to grooming, washing, and toilet facilities. Honorable Mentions Project name: Marine Education Center Designer: Lake|Flato Architects Location: Ocean Springs, Mississippi Project name: After Bottles; Second Lives Designer: ANAcycle design + writing studio/Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Location: Brooklyn, New York and Troy, New York
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2018 Best of Design Awards winners for Student Work

2018 Best of Design Awards winner for Student Work: mise-en-sand Designer: Jonah Merris, University of California, Berkeley Nature is artificial, and occasionally, it is artifice. So how can architecture act as a register of constructed ground in the era of the human geomorphic agent? Jonah Merris designed mise-en-sand, a proposal for a 21st-century exposition that addresses the extraction and exploitation of sand, as a series of six composed set designs that would allow visitors to consider the high volume–low value-paradox of sand as a global commodity. The sites and processes depicted in these vignettes showcase the breadth of scales and geographies across which the construction and deconstruction of ground occurs. Within mise-en-sand, architecture becomes a performance wherein objects are staged and meaning implied—a sandbox where observers can reconsider naturalism as it applies to something as ubiquitous as sand. Honorable Mentions Project name: Cloud Fabuland Designer: Eleonora Orlandi, SCI-Arc Project name: Real Fake Designer: James Skarzenski, University of California, Berkeley
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2018 Best of Design Awards winners for Young Architects

2018 Best of Design Awards winner for Young Architects: Runaway Designer: SPORTS Location: Santa Barbara, California Runaway is a mobile pop-up pavilion first developed by SPORTS for the Museum of Contemporary Art Santa Barbara. With the goal of bringing art to underrepresented neighborhoods, three self-similar, open-structure objects were designed to reference the foggy and hazy climate of California’s coastal region. The collection’s orientation and composition is intended to be rearranged at different sites. In each deployment, the project generates public space and arts programming for underserved communities. Runaway illustrates the potential for small architectural objects to add a robust and ephemeral layer to urban centers—one that repositions the city as a series of small episodic moments rather than grand architectural interventions. Honorable Mentions Project name: Noodle Soup Designer: office ca Location: Lake Forest, Illinois Project name: Malleable Monuments Designer: The Open Workshop Location: San Francisco