Posts tagged with "zero-net energy":

Architecture at Zero 2020

The 2020 Architecture at Zero competition challenge is to create a zero net energy library for the San Benito County Free Library in Hollister, CA. Entrants are encouraged to highlight any energy efficiency strategies or systems shown. In order to demonstrate the building design and its performance, entrants will provide the required documentation and may also include supplementary documentation. The preferred solution is an all-electric zero net energy library. The preferred solution will not include natural gas and will use electric power. ELIGIBILITY This competition is open to students, architects, landscape architects, urban planners, engineers, and designers anywhere in the world. AWARDS AND JUDGING Up to $25,000 in total prize money will be awarded to students and professional winners. Entries are judged on the presentation board highlighting the project and the supplementary documentation. A separate review panel will convene to jury the technical components, which will result in a Technical Evaluation provided to the Jury. The Jury will determine the winners from all submissions. The Technical Evaluation is not the sole criterion on which entries will be judged but acts as a complement to the overall project design evaluation. Entries are weighed individually, not in competition with others. Jury decisions will be based solely on the materials submitted. Criteria include quality of design, resolution of the program or idea, innovation, thoughtfulness, and technique. Winners will be announced in June 2020. Details forthcoming. DEADLINES The registration deadline is April 17, 2020, at 6:00 pm PST and the submission deadline is May 11, 2020, at 6:00 pm PST. Students must complete the registration form. Please note that the Architecture at Zero competition uses an electronic registration process. If you are submitting multiple projects, you will need to register each project separately. All submissions shall become the property of Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E), which reserves the right to exhibit and reproduce any of the submissions. By submitting a project, the entrant agrees to all terms and conditions outlined in the Architecture at Zero Terms and Conditions. In any public use of the submissions, credit will be given to the design team. All submissions are final. SITE INSPECTION Representatives from the San Benito County Free Library and PG&E will lead a tour of the competition site on March 21, 2020, at 12 noon. This session will be filmed and questions and answers posted on the website for those unable to attend in person. To Attend: Please confirm your attendance via RSVP to info@architectureatzero.com Address: 470 Fifth Street, Hollister, CA Wear sturdy shoes. The tour will take approximately 60 minutes.
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Architecture at Zero's net-zero energy competition winners announced

The 2016 winners for the Architecture at Zero competitionand the competition’s up-to-$25,000 prize—have been announced. This year’s competition focused on the development of zero-net energy (ZNE) student housing for the San Francisco State University campus in California. Entrants were asked to create an overall site plan to accommodate the erection of 784 housing units and attendant programs like a student services center, food hall, and child care facility. The schemes were also asked to address parking issues. Further, the competition brief compelled participants to develop the design of one particular building from their proposal to a greater level of detail in order to convey ZNE performance compliance and to provide documentation attesting to these performance standards. The competition is focused on fostering the development and proliferation of ZNE design due to an impending California state law requirement calling for all new single-family residential construction to be ZNE by 2020 with all new commercial construction to follow suit by 2030. Competition winners were appropriated based on two categories: those submitted by professional architecture firms and those submitted by students. Within each applicant category, winning entries were selected at the “special recognition,” “citation,” “merit,” or “honor” awards levels. Winners for student entries: Special Recognition Award: Sharing and Living by a student team from Tamkang University in Taipei, Taiwan.   Merit Award: Communal Operations by Steven Loutherback, Texas Tech. Honor award: Energized Canopy by Romain Dechavanne, Ecole Nationale Superior d’Architecture in Grenoble, France. Winners for professional entries: Citation Award: Piezien Circuit by Modus Studio, Fayetteville, Arkansas. Merit Award: Nexus by Dialog in Vancouver, Canada. Merit Award: Fog Catcher by LITTLE in Los Angeles. For more information on the Architecture at Zero competition, see the competition website.
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Y Combinator is funding a California net-zero design-build firm

  It seems that nearly every week we hear about a new startup securing millions in funding. Last spring (2nd quarter 2015) venture capitalists contributed $17.5 billion in investments, close to the highest level since 2000 (and we know what happened back then). But for now, the money is pouring in. Many West coast cities like San Francisco, Los Angeles, and Seattle are experiencing both the positive and unintended consequences of that growth. Now Y Combinator, the investment firm/incubator based in Mountain View, California with investments in high-profile companies like Airbnb, Dropbox, Instacart, and Reddit, has plans to go into the construction business. The company is backing a design-build firm, Acre Designs, that specializes in net-zero energy home kits. Acre Designs is seeking to break into the market and ride new net zero laws in California. In revisions to Title 24 last summer, the state mandated that all new residences (including single family, under three-story multifamily, and low income) meet net zero energy requirements by 2020. Commercial buildings must do the same by 2030. The California Energy Commission and the California Public Utilities Commission define net zero as energy-neutral buildings whose energy production is equal to energy consumption over the course of a year. There's a small-but-important detail in Title 24: the homes can be net-zero energy ready—not necessarily achieving net-zero energy levels—by 2020. The cost for Acre Design's houses is not cheap. Prices hover around $277-$333 per square foot but this includes construction and features such as solar panels and appliances. The firm is also giving discounts to people who rent their home for more than 50 days on Airbnb. The company is planning its first home/vacation rental hybrid for a client in Cannon Beach, Oregon. There are three size options: small (2 bedrooms, 1,200 square feet, $400K), medium (3 bedrooms, 1,500 square feet, $450k), and large (4 bedrooms, 1,800 square feet, $500k). There are also two design variants: a house with a more traditional pitched roof and a second, midcentury modern-inspired version that sports a butterfly roof. Once the foundation is ready, construction can take up to three months. It will be interesting to see how the California net-zero mandate, and the companies that fill the void, plays out. For now, we can wait and hope that reducing energy consumption is also considered in the ways people get to, and from, these homes.