Posts tagged with "Young Architects Program":

Video> CODA’s “Party Wall” To Open in June

Caroline O'Donnell's Ithaca-based studio, CODA, is preparing to build a towering pavilion in the courtyard of MoMA PS1 in Queens out of scrap from the manufacture of skateboards. O'Donnell talked to AN when the pavilion, called Party Wall, was unveiled in January, saying, "There are eight different kinds of skateboard forms, and each board has its own errors, which produce surprising effects." CODA has now released a stunning video rendering showing Party Wall peeking over the walls of the PS1 courtyard adjacent to landmarks like the graffiti-covered Five Pointz building across the street. It suggests how the crowds that flock to MoMA PS1 each summer might interact with the structure showing benches also made from scrap wood. (Plus, an easter egg: check out what the pavilion's shadow spells at the 1:40 mark!) Party Wall will open in late June and we'll be sure to see you there! All renderings courtesy MoMA PS1. Click on a thumbnail to launch the slideshow.
Placeholder Alt Text

International Winners of MoMA PS1 Young Architects Program

Here in New York, we're excited to see CODA's massive Party Wall installation made of scrap from skateboard manufacturing rise at MoMA PS1 for this year's Young Architects Program (YAP). But the annual YAP, which recognizes emerging architects and invites them to design and build a temporary installation, has gone global. MoMA has announced the third installment of YAP at Rome's MAXXI museum designed by bam! bottega di architettura metropolitan and has launched a new program in Istanbul won by SO? Architecture and Ideas. SO? Architecture and Ideas' installation, Sky Spotting Stop, calls for a series of mirrored sun shades that give height to the museum's courtyard and play off the waters of the nearby Bosphorus. The mirrored discs are intended to provide playful shadows and reflections during the day and can be uplit at night. The installation opens in June at Istanbul Modern. In Rome, bam! bottega di architettura metropolitan's Helium-filled installation, He, will float above the MAXXI's courtyard shading a grassy lawn and wooden platform below. During the day, water will drip from the installation to cool the plaza. At night, the mass will glow as a large, floating lantern. At the end of the summer, the Helium from the installation will be reused for scientific research. The installation will open on June 20 at the MAXXI museum. A third international program has also been established in Santiago, Chile.
Placeholder Alt Text

Wendy Arrives in Queens

Last night, crowds of young architecture types filled the courtyard at MoMA PS1 in Queens to meet Wendy, this year's Young Architects Program winner by HWKN. Visible from the nearby elevated subway station and from the streets around MoMA PS1, Wendy is comprised of pollution-fighting fabric spikes set in a grid of scaffolding intersecting the concrete courtyard walls. Yesterday's crowds were given special access to the interior of the installation, revealing a complex structure of poles, fans, and misters that will cool visitors this summer. MoMA PS1 will host its annual Warm Up music series in the courtyard beginning on July 7, showcasing "the best in experimental live music, sound, performance, and DJs." Wendy will officially open to the public on July 1. Meanwhile, at a taxi garage across the street, small fragments of last year's installation by Interboro called Holding Pattern are still in use on the sidewalk. Click on a thumbnail to launch the slideshow.
Placeholder Alt Text

Meet Wendy, HWKN’s pollutant-fighting pavilion at MoMA PS1

Fabrikator Brought to you by:

Wendy will eat the smog of the equivalent of 260 cars this summer

"I cannot wait for the data to come in so we can show people," said Matthias Hollwich, a principal of the Manhattan-based architecture firm HWKN. Hollwich is talking about the air quality monitoring system that will be hooked up to Wendy, the 3,000 square-foot star-shaped pavilion HWKN is currently installing in the courtyard of MoMA PS1 for the annual Young Architect's Program. Because PS1's Kraftwerk exhibition occupied the museum's courtyard until May 14th, HWKN only had six weeks to build Wendy, which will not only house a pool, a misting station, a water canon, an elevated dj booth and an exhibition space, it will "eat" smog all summer long thanks to a special little ingredient called TiO2. Developed by Cristal, a titanium dioxide products manufacturer, and Glen Finkel at PURETi, TiO2 is a titanium nanoparticle that, when activated by the sun, engages in photocatalytic oxidation, a chemical process that safely and instantly oxidizes organic matter at the molecular level and converts it into water vapor and trace amounts of CO2.  Since TiO2 is the catalyst, it's not consumed in the process. When it's applied to a building, a road or, in this case, a huge outdoor pavilion, its smog-fighting properties last for a minimum of five years. And because the water vapor washes away, the treated surfaces stay dramatically cleaner than their untreated counterparts. There are several brands of titanium dioxide coating on the market, but Finkel claims that PURETi's award-winning formula is the best because it doesn't come from a powder that’s mixed in or melted down, but from a liquid (99% water, 1% mineral content) so thin, clear and durable it can bond to virtually any surface, including fabric, glass and stone. It also requires less light to function than any known competitor, and is the only photocatalytic surface treatment known to work on the north side of a building in the shade. To maximize the surface area onto which TiO2 can be sprayed, HWKN created an intricate cluster of pointed shapes and employed structural engineers from Knippers Helbig, who worked for one month to develop a "totally reinvented" cross bracing system to hold the shape of the TiO2-treated PVC-based fabric from Botex(they were originally going to use nylon but it sags over time). “Normally when you have tensile structures it has a curve, and that has been done,” said Hollwich. “We wanted to do something formally different, so the cones are wrapped around the cross bracing which gives it its stealth form.” Surrounding Wendy with scaffolding was an aesthetic choice as much as it was a structural necessity. "The fabric is being pulled from the core to the edges and to be able to hold that edge we needed the scaffolding. The form of Wendy is also the structural system.” The whole framework is held in place by forty 5-foot-long temporary ground screws by Krinner that can be unscrewed in September when the pavilion is taken down. Using an equation based on the amount of nano particles sprayed onto Wendy, the estimated sun exposure and the average pollutants generated by local Long Island City traffic, HWKN calculated that over the course of the summer Wendy's paint job will clean up pollutants from the equivalent of 260 cars. If it sounds too good to be true, the only downside of TiO2 seems to be that it's expensive, though a little bit does go a long way—one gallon can cover 4,000 square feet. Still, at 70 cents per square-foot it's no surprise that Pureti's main clients aren't homeowners, but NASA and other large institutions like Los Angeles Community College, the 2015 Milan Expo, and office buildings in London. Hollwich sayid he's "surprised that the whole world isn't using it, because it's really magical," adding that he hopes the high visibility of Wendy will encourage more people to use TiO2 in everything from buildings and roads to textiles. In fact, MoMA will be selling t-shirts and totes sprayed down with TiO2, and after the summer programming is over Wendy herself will be cut apart and sewn into smog-fighting bags.
Placeholder Alt Text

Urban Movement Design to Transform Hadid’s MAXXI for Young Architects Program in Rome

Earlier this month, we were first to bring you renderings of HWKN's planned installation for MoMA's P.S. 1 Young Architects Program (YAP), but now AN has learned that YAP's counterpart in Rome has selected Urban Movement Design's proposal for a series of sinuous benches and archways covered in grass and hanging plants as the winner to fill Zaha Hadid's MAXXI museum piazza this June. New York and Rome-based Urban Movement Design has proposed a series of morphing benches comprised of a wooden grid infilled with grass to wrap around the piazza forming various seating arrangements that provide new ways of experiencing the museum. Several ribbed archways covered with flowering hanging plants connect the benches. Called Unire/Unite, the installation will host the museum's summer outdoor programs in addition to being open to the public. The benches will later be reused in other parts of Rome to form a relationship between the museum and its city. “This is an inclusive and playful project that inspires health and movement and invites the museum visitors to live the space as a shared experience accessible to all,” the team from Urban Movement Design said in a statement. The young architecture firm is run by Robyne Kassen, Sarah Gluck, and Simone Zbudil Bonatti and focuses on accessible design that promotes well-being and physical activity. Both Urban Movement Design's Unire/Unite and HWKN's Wendy will open to the public this June and a third YAP installation is planned for Santiago, Chile this December. An exhibition of all 15 finalists from the three YAP cities will also be on display. Last year's MAXXI installation by stARTT, the first at the venue, included a grass lawn with larger-than-life synthetic tulips hovering overhead.

MAXXI & PS 1 announce shortlist for 2012 Young Architects Program in Rome

The Italian website Tafter reports that the finalists are 6mu6 (Turin, Italy), Rural Boxx (Sacile, Italy), Urban Movement (New York, USA / Rome, Italy), and Yellow Office Yellow Office (Milan, Italy),  and a team composed of John A. Salvator Liotta, Matteo Belfiore with Taichi Kuma and Yuta Ito (Naples, Italy / Tokyo, Japan). The winner will be announced early in 2012, with the installation opening at the MAXXI in June simultaneously with New York's YAP installation at MoMA PS 1. In bocca al lupo!
Placeholder Alt Text

Letter from Rome: YAP Opening Night at the MAXXI

Imagine a warm summer evening in Rome. Then imagine stretching out on a cool, grass lawn underneath giant Jurassic tulips the size of a cherry tree. Their glow softly illuminates conversations over cocktails. Add a backdrop of the serpentine jewel of Zaha Hadid’s MAXXI museum, and you have theater. Rome is all about theater. So was the scene at the opening of the Young Architects Program installation at Rome’s one year old museum of art and architecture. Five young European firms were chosen as finalists by the MAXXI in collaboration with MoMA PS1's Young Architect's Program. The winner in Rome, stARTT Architects, installed 2000 square feet of luscious grass mini-hills inclined perfectly for reclining, so you can sdraiarsi, an untranslatable Roman manner of stretching out. Topping the hills are 20 or so three-foot wide tulips, each atop a six-foot curved stem. Semi-transparent red resin tulip-like flowers--a bit in the style of Avatar--light up in the evening and offer a bit of shade during the day. Mario Mattia, the resident architect in Rome for Hadid, had suggested a green space for the 12,000 square foot plaza court, drawing inspiration from a visit to the green lawn of Bryant Park beside the grand 42nd Street New York Public Library. But cut concrete paths and organized gravel won out--until now. Given a choice, humans gravitate toward the living and the green. StARTT architects managed to incorporate both elements into this built setting. So what did the user audience say about the installation on opening night? Papavere gigante! ("giant poppies!" omnipresent in the hills of Rome) and martini rossi! (martini glass-shaped flowers missing only the maraschino cherry). The giant tulips gently tilted your view upward to the rich evening turquoise of the Mediterranean sky, as you lay grounded on the refreshing islands of grass. A temporary installation? To quote another Roman, the emperor Hadrian: “Be attentive to the temporary, as it often becomes the permanent." Magari! (We hope so.)
Placeholder Alt Text

MoMA/P.S. 1 Young Architects Program Winner Announced

P.S. 1 and the Museum of Modern Art have just announced that Brooklyn-based urban design and planning firm Interboro Partners are the winners of the 2011 Young Architects Program. Now celebrating its 12th year, the honor means designing what by now is widely recognized as the liveliest party space of the summer, the outdoor plaza of P.S. 1 in Queens. Interboro's design for MoMA P.S.1 (Courtesy Interboro) “Simple materials that transform a space to create a kind of public living room and rec room are trademarks of this young Brooklyn firm,” said Barry Bergdoll, MoMa’s Philip Johnson chief curator. “Interboro is interested in creating elegant and unpretentious spaces with common materials. Their work has both a modesty and a commitment quite at odds with the luxury and complex computer-generated form that has prevailed in the city in recent years.” The firm has also been selected this year as one of the eight firms participating in the Emerging Voices series at the Architectural League. Much of their work focuses on urban challenges, from completing a neighborhood development plan for Newark, the first in decades, to a temporary park at Canal and Varick streets, Lent Space, with mobile trees, seating and walls. stARTT's design for Rome's MAXXI (Courtesy stARTT) Meanwhile, in Rome, a companion program called YAP_MAXXI in an outdoor space at the entrance of the new Zaha Hadid-designed museum, was also launched. Roman architects, stARTT, have been selected as the first-up in a partnership between MoMA P.S. 1 and the overseas institution, a model of a collaboration that could easily expand to other countries in no time. StARTT’s entry “Whatami” appears to be a series of discrete and turf-covered hillocks with Hadid-like curves constructed of various recyclable materials including straw, geo-textiles, and plastic. Recycling, in fact, was a key theme this year as Interboro also canvassed local libraries, greenmarkets, senior and daycare centers to see who might be able to use the rope and other materials when summer is over.
Placeholder Alt Text

MoMA′s Young Architects Program Heading to Rome

The prestigious Young Architects Program put on by the Museum of Modern Art and MoMA P.S.1 in New York has announced that it's teaming up with Rome's National Museum of 21st Century Arts, or MAXXI, to host a second outdoor installation at the new Zaha Hadid museum. MoMA’s chief curator of architecture and design, Barry Bergdoll who was on his way out of town for a vacation in Ethiopia before he takes up his post at Cambridge University to deliver the prestigious Slade Lectures, gave AN a call from Paragon Sporting Goods to describe the new initiative: “It’s something I have wanted to do for a while. When I went to MAXXI for their opening last year, we talked about what we could do together. You have a courtyard, I said, and while it’s not surrounded by a wall it is a big open space and they are doing programming much like what’s happening at PS1. They immediately said they wanted to do it. To use our name in the collaboration, they will be following all our guidelines and procedures. I see this as the first of several for Young Architects Programs that MoMA could get involved with globally. I want it to be localized; we are not exporting architects but trying to help grow young local talent. The five finalists in New York and in Italy will all be exhibited in both places, with just one or two judges from one group joining the other. Apart from that, the curating will remain within the home institutions. And they’ll open simultaneously.” A New York jury already announced the finalists for the MoMA P.S.1 exhibition in Queens, New York. The short list includes firms from Brooklyn, Boston, and London. A separate jury in Rome has chosen the finalists for the MAXXI installation from across Europe. Both juries consisted of MoMA, MoMA P.S.1, and MAXXI officials, but in an effort to lend a local flavor to the exhibitions, each was responsible for their own geographic area. Finalists for the Young Architects Program at the MAXXI:
  • Raffaella De Simone e Valentina Mandalari – Palermo, Italy
  • Ghigos Ideas – Lissone, Italy
  • Asif Khan – London
  • Langarita Navarro Arquitectos – Madrid
  • stARTT – Rome
Placeholder Alt Text

Warm-Up Lap for Pole Dance

Over the weekend, we happened to be biking by the (newly renamed) MoMA PS1 in Long Island City when we noticed something unusual, familiar, even. It was SO-IL's Pole Dance, this year's Young Architects pavilion, taking shape. The museum was closing, so we only snapped one furtive, washed-out photo (let's call it arty) on our cellphone before security made us leave. Fortunately, Frederick Fisher cut some slats in the imposing concrete wall he created as part of the museum's 1997 redesign, so we managed to capture a little bit more of the installation, emphasis on little. Still, it looks like it'll be fun, and we can't help but notice how close it is to the renderings, as you can see after the jump.