Posts tagged with "Woodbury University":

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Ingalill Wahlroos-Ritter named dean of Woodbury School of Architecture

The Woodbury University School of Architecture in Burbank, California has named Ingalill Wahlroos-Ritter as its new dean, according to a university announcement. Wahlroos-Ritter was previously acting interim dean at the school of architecture, following the passing of the former dean, Norman Millar, in 2016. Her tenure as dean is set to begin on June 1st, 2017. In its statement, Randy Stauffer, senior vice president of academic affairs at the university praised the new dean by saying, “As an inspiring leader dedicated to connecting the profession to the academy, [Wahlroos-Ritter] weaves a rich tapestry of interconnected ‘crafts’ with a specific but broad theoretical lens.” Wahlroos-Ritter joined the Woodbury faculty in 2005 and has filled a variety of positions at the school—including the undergraduate and graduate architecture chairs and as an associate dean—prior to being named interim dean roughly one year ago. Wahlroos-Ritter has spearheaded several important efforts at the university, including creating a digital fabrication lab and helping to launch the university’s graduate programs in architecture and landscape architecture. Previously, Wahlroos-Ritter has taught at Yale University, Cornell University, University College of London Bartlett School of Architecture, and Southern California Institute of Architecture. She also serves currently as the director of the Los Angeles Forum for Architecture and Urban Design’s advisory board. Wahlroos-Ritter is the third new architecture school dean appointed in the Los Angeles-area this year. Architect Milton Curry was recently selected as the new dean at the University of Southern California, replacing current dean Qingyun Ma while London-based architect Brett Steele was recently tapped as dean of the University of California, Los Angeles's School of the Arts and Architecture.
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Woodbury University team proposes L.A. to Mexico Hyperloop system

A proposal by a group of Woodbury University School of Architecture–affiliated architects has been named among one of the 35 semi-finalists for the Hyperloop One Global Challenge competition aimed at generating pilot projects to deploy the next-generation transportation technology. According to the Hyperloop One website, competition organizers were seeking to teams that would “put forward a comprehensive commercial, transport, economic, and policy case for their cities, regions, or countries to be considered to host the first hyperloop networks.” The Woodbury University team’s proposal—generated by a collective made up of Woodbury University adjunct faculty Rene Peralta, architect Alejandro Santander of Estudio Santander in Tijuana, Mexico, and Woodbury alumnus Juan Alatorre—aims to connect the Southern California region via Hyperloop. The team envisions utilizing the technology to cut travel times between Los Angeles and Ensenada, Mexico down to roughly 20 minutes. The trip currently takes about five hours to complete via automobile. The Woodbury University team will present their work in Washington, D.C. on April 5th as part of the second round of the competition. Teams that make it to the final round will be announced in May of this year. Hyperloop One has received 2,600 competition submissions in the five months since the competition was announced. Teams representing 17 countries are among the other groups vying for the winning proposal, including 11 teams from the United States, five teams from India, and four from the United Kingdom. Describing the submissions received for the competition, Rob Lloyd, CEO, Hyperloop One said, “The Hyperloop One Global Challenge unleashed ideas from some of the world’s most creative engineers and planners, who care as much as we do about the future of transportation.” Lloyd added that the potential for the technology went beyond fulfilling simple transportation needs, saying, “These are all solutions that can make a real and immediate social and economic impact.”
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Photographer Todd Eberle wins the Julius Shulman Institute’s 2017 Excellence in Photography Award

Burbank, California–based Woodbury University has announced that the university’s Julius Shulman Institute (JSI) will bestow the 2017 Excellence in Photography Award on acclaimed international photographer Todd Eberle. New York City–based Eberle has been Vanity Fair magazine’s Photographer at Large for over 20 years and is known widely for his “clean and analytical minimalist aesthetic,” according to a press release issued in support of the award. Eberle's work includes photographs of designs by Mies van der Rohe, Phillip Johnson, Oscar Niemeyer, Donald Judd, Le Corbusier, John Pawson, Peter Zumthor, among others. His portrait works include photographs of works by Oscar Niemeyer, Morris Lapidus, Donald Judd, Tadao Ando, Annabelle Selldorf, Herzog & de Meuron, Rem Koolhaas, David Adjaye, Peter Zumthor, Massimo and Lella Vignelli, and Dan Kiley. The university will hold an exhibition of Eberle’s work—titled Todd Eberle: Empire of Space and curated by Audrey Landreth—at Woodbury University’s Hollywood Outpost (WUHO) gallery featuring his portraits of well-known architects, including Zaha Hadid, Frank Gehry, Julius Shulman, Florence Knoll Bassett, and Phillip Johnson. The award will be presented to Eberle by architect and executive director of the JSI Barbara Bestor at a ceremony marking the occasion at WUHO Gallery.
Todd Eberle: Empire of Space Opens at WUHO May 4, 2017 Curator: Audrey Landreth May 4 to June 25, 2017 Opening Reception: May 4, 2017, 6 to 8 pm
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Billie Tsien to moderate keynote panel at Woodbury University’s interiors-focused Unmentionables Symposium

Woodbury University School of Architecture’s Department of Interior Architecture will be holding a two-day event in April called the Unmentionables Symposium. The event will celebrate the “unmentioned” territories of the contemporary interior design disciplines. The event—to be held April 7th and 8th at the Helms Design Center in Culver City, California —will focus on uncovering “new narratives for interior architecture” by “establishing a precedent for welcoming previously unmentioned ideas in spatial practice and theory,” according to a press release published by the symposium organizers. As the symposium’s moniker suggests, no topic will be off the table and, in fact, organizers hope to use the event to launch a “provocation for marginalia, taboos, illicit ideas, and undertheorized issues such as critical interiority and physical and virtual constructed environments,” with the overall aim of the symposia being to bring the new critical discourses surrounding interior architecture to light. The symposium is being held partially as a response to a recent increase in the prevalence and complexity of interior architecture discourse and the broadening of interdisciplinary conversations focused on problematizing the discipline in its own right, rather than merely looking at it as an ancillary topic to architecture. The symposia will be made up of a series of panel discussions and lectures and will feature a keynote panel discussion moderated by Billie Tsien, principal at the New York–based architecture firm Tod Williams Billie Tsien Architects. The keynote panel will include an introduction by Annie Chu as well as presentations by Virginia San Fratello, Sylvia Faichney, Molly Hunker and Greg Corso. For a full breakdown of the panel discussions and for registration information, see the Unmentionables Symposium website.
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SCI-Arc and Woodbury University both launch new architectural scholarships

The Southern California Institute of Architecture (SCI-Arc) and the Woodbury University School of Architecture in Los Angeles separately announced new scholarship opportunities for students this week. SCI-Arc’s latest new scholarship program—the third such new initiative launched in the last year by the university—is part of a new partnership with the country of Colombia aimed at benefitting students attending the university's new SCI-Arc Bogota program. SCI-Arc Bogota was launched last year in order to create a pipeline for Colombian and South American students seeking access to SCI-Arc’s undergraduate and graduate architectural programs. In a press release announcing the new scholarship, SCI-Arc Director Hernan Diaz Alonso said, “We are happy to continue expanding SCI-Arc’s relationship with diverse parts of the world,” making reference to the Bogota location as well as the recently-opened SCI-Arc Mexico outpost in Mexico City the school also debuted last year. The new initiative will be helmed by Juan Ricardo Rincon Gaviria, principal at Taller Paralelo Arquitectos in Bogota, a noted international firm. SCI-Arc Bogota’s educational program also includes a double-degree accreditation with the University of the Andes’ masters program and a full annual scholarship grant for Colombian students with the Foundation for the Future of Colombia (COLFUTURO).  COLFUTURO was founded in 1991 by public and private sector leaders in the country to “promote, guide, and finance graduate studies for Colombian professionals” attending international universities. The foundation benefits a selected student who is awarded up to $50,000 over two years in financing. SCI-Arc’s new scholarship aims to match this amount for the selected student. Applications for the foundation’s Loan-Scholarship program are due February 28; the winner of the scholarship will be announced in May 2017. Woodbury University also announced this week that initial contributions to the Norman R. Millar Scholarship Endowment fund had surpassed $30,000. The fund, which will benefit the school’s overall architectural scholarship programs, was started by the university after Millar’s death early last year. Starting in 1999 Millar served as dean of the university’s architecture school and is credited with helping increase its enrollment threefold over the course of his tenure. Millar also focused strongly on increasing diversity at the school and was instrumental in developing the Integrated Path to Architectural Licensure (IPAL) initiative through the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards (NCARB). IPAL facilitates students’ ability to complete the requirements necessary for architectural licensure concurrently along with their degrees. In a press release announcing the scholarship fund’s endowment, Ingalill Wahlroos-Ritter, interim dean, Woodbury School of Architecture, lauded Millar’s contributions to the university, saying “Norman’s talent and experience as a practitioner and vision as an educator helped thousands of young people achieve success in the field of architecture. Hardly a day goes by that we don’t hear from a former student, colleague or fellow architect whose career was inspired by Norman’s leadership, and who wishes to honor his legacy by making a contribution to the scholarship endowment established in his memory.” Donations can be made to the Norman R. Millar Scholarship Endowment here.
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Architect Norman Millar has passed away

A celebrated educator and practicing architect, Millar had been at the helm of his firm, Norman Millar Architects since 1985, focusing on contemporary residential designs. Millar was named Dean of Woodbury’s School of Architecture in 1999; he ushered in that university’s recent boom in enrollment, accolades, and expansion. Under Millar’s leadership, Woodbury’s Architecture School’s enrollment nearly tripled, adding large proportions of minority students and first-generation college attendees to its rosters. In 2008, for these efforts, Woodbury was recognized with a special citation from Excelencia in Education, an organization that touts institutions that promote the achievement of Latino students nationwide. Before his appointment at Woodbury, Millar had also taught at the Southern California Institute of Architecture (SCI-Arc), University of Southern California, Pasadena Art Center, and the University of California Los Angeles.  He was also heavily involved in civic, professional, and community-focused endeavors, holding seats on various advisory boards, including the Los Angeles Forum for Architecture and Urban Design and Los Angeles Chapter of the AIA. He was also currently serving as president of the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture. As an active practitioner and academic, Millar’s professional interests spanned the gamut of architectural discipline, but dwelt primarily on the issues of critical practice, alternative practice, urban forestry, and everyday urbanism. A published essayist, Millard’s writing on the plight of Los Angeles street vendors was included in Everyday Urbanism, edited by Margaret Crawford, John Chase, and John Kaliski and published by Monacelli Press of New York in 1999.
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On View> Gregory Ain: Low-Cost Modern Housing and The Construction of a Social Landscape

Gregory Ain: Low-Cost Modern Housing and The Construction of a Social Landscape WUHO Gallery 6518 Hollywood Boulevard, Los Angeles Through April 26 Gregory Ain was a pioneer in the development of low-cost modern housing, and many of his efforts fused radical, left-wing politics and cooperative living with architecture. And a new exhibit in Los Angeles spotlights five of the architect’s most innovative housing projects. Projects included in the exhibit at Woodbury University's WUHO Gallery in Hollywood are Dunsmuir Flats, Park Planned Homes, Avenel Cooperative Housing, Mar Vista Housing, and Community Homes Cooperative. The show consists of classic black and white photographs by Julius Shulman and contemporary color shots by Korean artist Kyungsub Shin. Shin’s photos—first commissioned for the 2011 Gwangju Design Biennale in South Korea—document how Ain’s small-yet-well-resolved houses—clustered to lower costs, share resources, and create social connections—can still accommodate contemporary lifestyles. "People are highly attracted to these houses today,” said show curator Anthony Fontenot. "There's something very comfortable about them, but they're still strikingly modern." The show also includes original materials, such as Ain’s “manifesto” of the planned community, fleshed out with drawings, documents, letters, and other archival materials. "We could learn a lot from looking at his ideas," said Fontenot. "Our own ecological, economic, and political climate demands that you cannot exist on your own."
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On View> Unnatural Spaces: The Photography of Richard Barnes

UNNATURAL SPACES: PHOTOGRAPHY OF RICHARD BARNES The Julius Shulman Institute at Woodbury 7500 N Glenoaks Blvd. Burbank, CA Through October 22 In Unnatural Spaces, co-curators Emily Bills and Eve Schillo present the featured work of photographer Richard Barnes at the Julius Shulman Institute at the Woodbury University School of Architecture. Showcasing highlighted works from his Unabomber (1999) and Animal Logic (2009) series, the exhibit suggests that architecture is both a willing participant in, and also an unknowing target of, presentation. The show encompasses commissioned works of Barnes ranging globally from Los Angeles to Kazakhstan, and new work such as “Revel Casino Construction,” from Atlantic City (above). Barnes is a Rome Prize recipient for photography and was featured in the 2006 Whitney Biennial for his work documenting the cabin of Ted Kaczyinski. The venue, the Julius Shulman Institute, was established as a cultural destination dedicated to the promotion of photography and understanding the built environment.