Posts tagged with "Winka Dubbeldam":

Mirage houses, Mongolian blob museums, and other updates from the architects of Instagram

At The Architect’s Newspaper, we’re plain addicted to Instagram. Sure, we love seeing Brutalist concrete through “Inkwell” or “Ludwig” filters, but there’s also no better place to see where architects are getting their inspiration, how they’re documenting the built environment, and where they’ve traveled of late. Below, we bring you some of the best Instagrams of this past week! (Also, don’t forget to check out our Instagram account here.) A new exhibit on the historical iterations and potential of scaffolding went up at the Center for Architecture, and Shohei Shigematsu of OMA was the exhibition's lead designer. https://www.instagram.com/p/BZmIjN-hQh0/?taken-by=centerforarch A short hop across the East River, the Noguchi Museum is gearing up for the October 25 opening of Gonzalo Fonseca's architectural sculptures, many carved from stone. https://www.instagram.com/p/BZ1f0wpHH1F/?taken-by=noguchimuseum SO-IL's Florian Idenburg paid a visit to a panopticon prison in Haarlem, Netherlands called Kijk in de Koepel. His visit was timed perfectly with two news bits that had us chuckling this week: One upsettingly real (Jeremy Bentham's literal severed head displayed in an upcoming exhibit), and the other pure satire (meet Synergon). https://www.instagram.com/p/BZoAOCVn8AC/?taken-by=florianidenburg Andrés Jaque, founder of Office for Political Innovation, posted the opening of his new exhibit titled Transmaterial Politics, which opened at Tabacalera Madrid on September 28. Poppy and probing as always. https://www.instagram.com/p/BZpq6FJAz4E/?taken-by=andres_jaque MAD Architects threw us back to their Ordos Museum in inner Mongolia, a mass of organic and rigid forms cloaked under an undulating shell of metal tiles. Without wanting to, we will imagine it springing to life at night and prowling the Gobi Desert under a shrouded moon, much like Gehry museums (wherever they live). https://www.instagram.com/p/BZnkPdyFNdq/?taken-by=madarchitects Geoff Manaugh, author of BLGBLOG, visited the extremely Instagrammable Mirage by Douglas Aitken in the California Desert which is clad with mirrors both inside and out. https://www.instagram.com/p/BZ4WEW5j_M1/?taken-by=bldgblog The DesignPhiladelphia conference shared their city's redeveloped Navy Yards, landscaped by James Corner Field Operations. https://www.instagram.com/p/BZy-YJzF9WA/?taken-by=designphilly This last one is short and sweet, and we tell you this only because of the crushing guilt that would consume us otherwise. Winka Dubbeldam ate a grasshopper. https://www.instagram.com/p/BZ0lE02BVh9/?taken-by=winkadub That’s it for today, hashtag archilovers and quote-on-quote gallerinas. See you next week for more drama.

PennDesign receives $1.25 million gift for architecture prizes

For school alumni, solicitation emails from the alumni office usually elicit groans, not checks. University of Pennsylvania School of Design alum Lori Kanter Tritsch (M.Arch. '85) took a slightly different approach, pledging $1.25 million to her alma mater to establish two prizes for architects. It is the largest single donation for fellowships the school has ever received. Kanter Tritsch is a career architect who sits on the school's Board of Overseers. She made the pledge with her longtime partner, William P. Lauder, the executive chairman of cosmetics giant Estée Lauder, who is also a University of Pennsylvania alum. Part of Kanter Tritsch's gift will establish a $50,000 fellowship for "the most promising graduate architecture student at PennDesign." This fellowship, dubbed the Kanter Tritsch Prize in Energy and Architectural Innovation, will be awarded yearly to a second-year M.Arch. student who demonstrates a thoughtful approach to the issues of "energy, ecology, and/or social equity." The gift will also establish the Kanter Tritsch Medal for Excellence in Architecture and Environmental Design, an award for practicing architects whose work has been under-recognized but who "changed the course of design history," particularly in their approach to energy, environment, and diversity. Current PennDesign faculty aren't eligible. Juries for the fellowship and medal will be led by Winka Dubbeldam, professor and chair in school's Department of Architecture as well as the founder of Archi-Tectonics. In a prepared statement, Dubbeldam complimented the gift's role in highlighting under-appreciated work: "The architecture profession can be slow to recognize young talent. At the same time, many established architects never receive the public recognition they deserve." The juries will be announced this fall, and the first set of winners will be announced in the fall of 2018.

Meet AN’s 2015 Best Of Design Awards Jury

header_art_900px_final_blog While architecture and design firms across the country and around the world gear up to register (the deadline is November 3) for The Architect's Newspaper's 2015 Best Of Design Awards, we'd like to take the opportunity to introduce this year's jury. As with last year, we invited a group of prominent design professionals whose expertise covers the nine categories in which we are giving awards. Collectively, they will lend their broad experience and individual perspectives to what is certain to be the very difficult task of choosing the best of many sterling projects. Thomas Balsley is the founder and design principal of New York City–based landscape architecture, site planning, and urban design firm Thomas Balsley Associates (TBA). Founded in the early 1970s, TBA has completed a range of work from feasibility planning studies to built urban parks, waterfronts, corporate, commercial, institutional, residential, and recreational landscapes. In New York City alone, the firm has designed more than 100 public landscapes, including Peggy Rockefeller Plaza, Chelsea Waterside Park, Riverside Park South, and the Queens West parks Gantry Plaza State Park and Hunters Point Community Park.  Winka Dubbeldam is founder and principal of Archi-Techtonics and the Chair of the Graduate Architecture School at PennDesign, Philadelphia. Since 1994, Archi-Techtonics has completed multiple ground-up buildings and renovations, including 497 Greenwich in New York City's Soho neighborhood, which combines the renovation of a 19th-century warehouse with the construction of an 11-story "smart loft." The firm has also received many awards, including The Architecture League of New York's 2011 Emerging Voices award.  Kenneth Drucker has been director of design in HOK's New York City office since 1998. During that time he's lead the design process on all kinds of projects around the globe, including the Harlem Hospital Modernization in New York, the Sheraton Incheon Hotel in South Korea, and the University of Buffalo School of Medicine in Buffalo, New York. He is also a member of HOK's board of directors and design board. Chris McVoy has been with Steven Holl Architects since 1993. He made partner in 2000. He has been the partner-in-charge and co-designer for the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas City, the Whitney Water Purification Facility and Park, the Campbell Sports Center at Columbia University, and the Glasgow School of Art. He is currently partner-in-charge for the Institute for Contemporary Art at VCU, and the new Visual Arts Building at the University of Iowa.  Craig Schwitter founded Buro Happold's first North American office in 1999. With more than 20 years of experience, he has led the multi-disciplinary engineering process on multiple project types, including educational, performing arts, cultural, civic, stadia, transportation, and master planning projects. Under his direction Buro Happold has developed the Adaptive Building Initiative and G. Works, both related industry efforts that address today’s critical low carbon and high performance building design issues. Annabelle Selldorf is principal of Selldorf Architects, which she founded in 1988. The firm has worked on public and private projects that range from museums and libraries to a recycling facility; and at scales from the construction of new buildings to the restoration of historic interiors and furniture design. She is a Fellow of the American Institute of Architects, an Academician of the National Academy Museum, and seves on the Board of the Architectural League of New York and the Chinati Foundation.  Erik Tietz and Andrew Baccon founded digital design and fabrication studio Tietz-Baccon in 2007. The studio has realized custom architectural elements and installations for a broad spectrum of clients that range from Asymptote Architects and Belzberg Architects, to Tiffany & Co. and The Museum of Modern Art. The firm works on every stage of a project, from conception to prototyping to fabrication and installation. 

Winning Crowdsourced Designs Unveiled for New York City Hotel

It is only fitting that a crowdfunded hotel slated for New York City has a crowdsourced design as well. For its new, extended-stay hotel at 17 John Street, developer Prodigy Network, along with design blog PSFK, launched the Prodigy Design Lab, which allowed designers from around the world to submit plans for the project's interior spaces and digital services. After 70 submissions were received and 10,000 votes cast, three winners have been announced. "The winners of the 17John competition were intuitive to the needs of travelers, creative in the interactive spaces and understood the function of extended stay residences,” Rodrigo Nino, the founder and CEO of Prodigy Network, said in a statement. “This will be one of many design competitions presented to the crowd and we look forward to empowering those with the greatest ideas.” These three plans, which were selected by a jury from the ten finalists, represent three categories: private space, communal space, and digital experience. The winning private space design, "Weco, The Nomad Company" by Vianney Lacotte creates a live-work environment with space for entertaining and storage. For public space, "Hub" creates a wood-paneled reception area, fitness center, rooftop terrace, and communal workspace that looks like just about any startup company. And  the "Deeply Integrated Services for the New Type of Hotel" proposal is an app meant to to better connect a guest with the hotel. Playing up the project's cooperative nature, the developer described this project as the "World’s First Cotel,” which is designed to “to meet the changing needs of the modern business traveler and through its innovative design will foster wellness, connectivity and efficiency.” The $31 million Cotel will transform an existing 1920’s apartment building with a multi-story glass addition designed by Winka Dubbeldam. According to Prodigy's website, "accredited investors can purchase REPs (Real Estate Participation) in 17John and buy into the project’s operating returns and equity appreciation. The REPs are being sold at $50,000 each." The project is expected to open in 2017. Take a look at the winning designs below.

Architectural Stars Align at Storefront for Art & Architecture Benefit

The architecture social calendar in New York includes a bewildering array of benefits, parties, fundraisers, and charity auctions. But the yearly event that brings out the most party loving architects is the Storefront for Art and Architecture's benefit and art auction. The Storefront always gets the most fabulous venues for its events and this year's was beyond spectacular: the 1893 Bowery Savings Bank. Designed by Stanford White of McKim, Mead and White the space takes up a huge through block site between the Bowery, Grand, and Elizabeth streets. The interior is a riot of colorful Siena marble walls, mosaic floors, faux marble scagliola columns, coffered ceilings, and stairs and skylights made of cast iron. This nearly indescribable landmark was the perfect venue for Storefront's grand director Eva Franch and even more grand board president Charles Renfro to introduce the gala's honored guests Olafur Eliasson and the composer, vocalist, and choreographer Meredith Monk. They appeared on a high balcony and spotlight like opera stars, talked about the importance of the Storefront to the arts community in the city and asked everyone to bid aggressively on the art works in the auction. Robert M. Rubin, Storefront board member, bid on a small Louis Kahn sketch. Other works by Ann Hamilton, Kiki Smith, Terence Gower, and Denise Scott Brown all sold to eager buyers. Bernard Tschumi, who donated a print from his Manhattan Transcript series, also bid on and, with his wife Kate Linker, gazumped all other bidders to take away a magical Meredith Monk print of a musical score. The event bought in a total of $344,370 to the Storefront.  

Review> The New Normal: Penn Symposium Explores Generative Digital Design

[Editor's Note: The following review was authored by Gideon Fink Shapiro and Phillip M. Crosby.] A generation’s worth of experimentation with generative digital design techniques has seemingly created a “new normal” for architecture. But what exactly are the parameters of this “normal” condition? On November 14th and 15th Winka Dubbeldam, principal of Archi-Tectonics and the new Chair of the Department of Architecture at the University of Pennsylvania, called together some of contemporary architecture’s most prominent proponents of generative digital design techniques for a symposium, The New Normal, examining how these techniques have transformed the field over the past twenty years. According to Ms. Dubbeldam and her colleagues in Penn’s post-professional program who organized the symposium, digital tools have “fundamentally altered the way in which we conceptualize, design, and fabricate architecture.” Participants were asked not only to reflect upon the recent past, but also to speculate on future possibilities. Even among this select group of practitioners, the shared enthusiasm for digital techniques does not imply an affinity of beliefs or approaches. While Patrik Schumacher (who, notably, lectured at Penn one week later) would have us believe that parametric techniques will triumphantly lead to a New International Style, what the New Normal symposium revealed was not a singular orthodoxy, but rather a rich multiplicity of approaches. On the one hand, one perceives a renewed sense of craftsmanship in which computation and robot-assisted fabrication can "extend the potential of what the hand can do," in the words of Gaston Nogues of Ball-Nogues Studio. On the other hand, ever-increasing computational and 3D-modeling power have nourished a whole field of virtual "screen architecture" that follows in the tradition of conceptual and utopian proposals. In his opening keynote address, Neil Denari discussed several contemporary artists—from Gerhard Richter to Tauba Auerbach—who use or misuse tools to elicit unexpected results. Similarly for architects, the computer should be seen as a filter or intermediary tool between author and work, rather than a seamless executor of authorial will. More pointedly, Roland Snooks of Kokkugia asked, "What are the behavioral biases of digital design tools?" He then suggested that contemporary architects might need to invent and design their own tools (software plug-ins and algorithms) in parallel with the architecture. Simon Kim of IK Studio went so far as to attribute to machines an agency once reserved for humans. And Francois Roche of New-Territories Architects said, "We have to torture the machine" to stretch its conventional functions, teasing out new "erotic bodies" and "ways to tell a story" through playful cunning. Lou Reed, David Bowie, and Jimi Hendrix were all invoked, but not by the speaker who wore sunglasses during his talk—Jason Payne of Hirsuta. Citing previously published remarks by Jeffrey Kipnis and Greg Lynn, Payne urged architects to test the assumed limits of their digital instruments, just as Hendrix pushed the limits of his guitar by playing it upside-down and incorporating electronic feedback in his radical performance of the “Star-Spangled Banner” at Woodstock in 1969. However, Payne cautioned, as he cued a slide of Eddie van Halen, the pursuit of technical virtuosity alone can lead to manneristic excess. Indeed, what made Hendrix's Woodstock performance great was not only his innovative guitar work but also his subversive and liberating rendition of the national anthem at a time of social upheaval, sharpened by his insider-outsider status as an African-American rock star. The point is, instrumentation cannot necessarily be isolated from the substance of a work and the social conditions in which it is produced. Tobias Klein gave voice to the digital zeitgeist in declaring, "We [human beings] are soft, malleable data sets." Yet if everything is now data, including bodies and buildings, how and to whose advantage is that data analyzed and applied? Selection criteria are inevitably human constructs that may take the form of artistic judgment, energy metrics, economic models, or political values. Ben van Berkel of UNStudio hinted at the conundrum of data analysis in his concluding keynote, in which he listed "different scales at which information comes together"—namely the diagram, the design model, and the prototype. But alas the Dutch architect, an acknowledged master of the diagram, did not elaborate on how, exactly, his office wrangles messy information into a clear design mandate. One notable absence from the slate of participants in the symposium was a critic or historian to situate the New Normal within both the history of architectural practice and the wider milieu of contemporary culture. While one of the most prominent theorists of generative design, Manuel De Landa, made important contributions to the discussions, his comments focused not on situating the discourse, but instead on the artistic repurposing of non-linear, morphogenetic tools developed by scientists to create more personalized digital form-finding devices. Also lacking were the voices of women, who numbered only three out of twenty speakers and moderators, including Ms. Dubbeldam. What the relentless experimentation among the symposium’s participants suggests is that, while there may be a new normal for the practice of architecture, it has yet to become normative—and that is a sign of its vitality.

Archi-Tectonic Cheer

Architects, designers, and a few sharp Irish guys who knew someone at the door converged on the Tribeca Grand Hotel last Wednesday night when Winka Dubbeldam of Archi-Tectonics and Cinzia Fama-Agnolucci of CFA Design threw a bash in The Salon. The Archi-Tectonics-designed space, provided a sultry backdrop to this family affair. Fama-Agnolucci’s mother kept watch from a low perch at the entrance as someone’s toddler made a beeline for Dubbeldam’s dog, who promptly snubbed her, preferring the company of a low-lying plate of hors d'oeuvres.

Dancing on Cobblestones

Last Friday, we hosted a party with Architizer at the Dom Showroom on Crosby Street. Valcucine was showing off its latest wares as part of ICFF, including a special line called in glass, with pieces by Thom Mayne, Alessandro Mendini, Steven Holl, and Winka Dubbeldam, who was in attendance with fellow architect-about-town Jonathan Marvel. Other notables included Charles Renfro and photographer Adam Friedberg, plus a few delightful bottles of scotch and duck sliders by Savoy's Peter Hoffman, making for the delightful evening.

Welcome Home Winka

We were surprised and delighted Monday upon reading in Page Six (okay, on Curbed, since we only read the Post when we're feeling kinky) that one of our favorite designers, Winka Dubbeldam of Archi-Tectonics, will be designing a new club in Amsterdam (you know what that means!) for her fellow Dutchwoman Amy Sacco of Bugnalow 8 fame. Not only is this not the best time for clubbing, but now our dear Winka was cooler than ever, even that nifty condo of hers (aren't they all?) down on Greenwich Street. We wrote Winka with a whole list of queries about renderings, locations, and lurid nightlife tails. Sadly, all we got back was this, presumably in reference to our dreams of a cool, crazy, possibly tropical design: "Not yet :-)" For now, then, we're left with our bated breath to keep us warm on those cold MePa nights. Do save us a spot on the guest list, won't you Winka?