Posts tagged with "Washington University in St. Louis":

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The bold proposal to transform the USPS into tool for fighting food insecurity

Graduate students from the Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts and the Brown School at the Washington University in St. Louis have been named the winners of the UrbanSOS: Fair Share Competition. The competition, led by AECOM and the Van Alen Institute, asked entrants to design for the sharing economy while addressing critical urban issues. The winning entry, First Class Meal, proposes to revitalize an underutilized United States Postal Service (USPS) post office, turning it into a resource for storing and redistributing surplus food. The proposal calls for a pairing of mobile technology with the distribution network of the USPS. “We want to connect underutilized capacity within the postal system—building space, trucks and human capital resources—with the desire for increased reach and food storage capacity within food banks and agencies,” explained architecture and urban design master’s candidate Anu Samarajiva in a press release. The project “has the potential to reinvigorate the USPS and more strongly define its role as a community resource while strengthening the existing network of community food providers.” The location of the proposal was the Market Station Post office in downtown Los Angeles. The team chose to center their project in Los Angeles for its active food culture, access to California’s farmlands, and the more than 1 million residents that lack food security. Nonprofits, who lack storage space and distribution capabilities, are the ones working with the large population of those in need. First Class Meal aims to address both of these issues while providing a new use for the many post offices which may be facing closure of consolidation in the near future. The UrbanSOS competition drew 80 teams form 31 countries. The Washington University team received a $7,500 prize along with up to $25,000 in cash and in-kind staff support for implementing the proposal. The competition's other recognized projects focused on producing crowd-sourced resource maps in Ecuador, waste management and temporary housing in South Africa, and pop-up restaurants and markets to serve refugee, residents, and tourists in Athens, Greece.
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Three finalists named in PXSTL design-build competition

The Pulitzer Arts Foundation and the Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts at Washington University in St. Louis have announced three finalists for the second iteration of the design-build PXSTL competition. The three finalist were culled from a list of 35 artist, architects, and designers, who were solicited by the organizer. The list includes: —Randstad, NL and Istanbul-based architects Merve Bedir and Jason Hilgefort —New York/Houston-based artist Mary Ellen Carroll —Chicago-based architect Amanda Williams and artist/educator Andres L. Hernandez PXSTL (David Johnson) Canopy of the 2014 PXSTL structure. (David Johnson) All of the finalist will travel to St. Louis in mid-February to conduct detailed site analysis and give public presentations on their previous work and interest in PXSTL. The winner will be announced in March. Along with an $80,000 budget to complete the project, the winner will teach an architecture studio as visiting faculty at the Sam Fox Graduate School of Architecture & Urban Planning in Fall 2016 semester. With commentary from community stakeholders, cultural organizers and local artist, the winner will work with their students to develop the project over the semester. PXSTL (an acronym for Pulitzer, Sam FoX School, and ST. Louis) is a competition for a design-build commission to build a temporary structure on an empty lot near the Pulitzer Art Foundation in the Grand Center arts district. The fist iteration of the PXSTL was completed in 2014 by the Brooklyn-based Freecell Architecture. Their project comprises of a large canopy under which dance, music, and community events were held throughout the summer of 2014. This year’s competition will conclude in the pavilion construction in spring of 2017 and community programing through the summer of 2017. The goal of PXSTL is in engage the community with small-scale intervention to encourage urban transformation. As part of this, the public will have a chance to offer feedback in public forums to be held in the fall. “Since its founding, the Pulitzer has been dedicated to creating opportunities for art and culture to have a positive impact on the broader St. Louis community. As PXSTL demonstrates, this means working closely with and listening carefully to both our community and cultural partners.” Remarked Cara Starke, director of the Pulitzer Arts Foundation, in a press release.
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On View> Drawings by Hadid, Tschumi, Gehry, Libeskind, and Koolhaas are being exhibited right now in St. Louis

Drawing Ambience: Alvin Boyarsky and the Architectural Association Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum Washington University in St. Louis 1 Brookings Dr, St Louis, MO Through January 4th The Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum in St. Louis is currently exhibiting early drawings from some of the world’s leading architects including Zaha Hadid, Bernard Tschumi, Frank Gehry, Daniel Libeskind, and Rem Koolhaas. The works come from the private collection of the late Alvin Boyarsky who chaired the Architectural Association School of Architecture (AA) in London from 1971 to 1990. The collection includes about 40 prints and drawings from the architects, and nine limited-edition folios published by the AA. Those folios include works from Peter Cook, Coop Himmelblau, and Peter Eisenman. “Drawing Ambience offers a rare glimpse into a pivotal moment in architectural history and the imaginative spirit of drawing that was and continues to be instrumental to the development of the field,” said the Kemper Museum in a statement. The exhibit was co-organized with the Museum of Art Rhode Island School of Design and will travel to Providence in April. This is the first public museum exhibition of Boyarsky’s collection.
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On View> Encountering the City: The Urban Experience in Contemporary Art

Encountering the City: The Urban Experience in Contemporary Art Kemper Art Museum at the Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts Washington University in St. Louis 1 Brookings Dr., St Louis, MO Through January 4, 2015 Encountering the City: The Urban Experience in Contemporary Art, an exhibition arriving at the Kemper Art Museum in St. Louis, explores artists’ responses to the contemporary built environment. Paintings, sculptures, photography, and videos from internationally renowned artists in addition to those exhibited in the museum’s own collections, are presented by a sampling of artists including Franz Ackermann, Isa Genzken, Jakob Kolding, Sarah Morris, Gary Simmons, and Wolfgang Tillmans. The exhibit focuses on the link between art and architecture and allows the artists to showcase their response to rapidly evolving environments, whether psychological or concrete, through different forms of media. Among them, Gary Simmons’ Plaza Inferno Grid (2008) illustrates a dystopian future in the wake of class and race issues in American society, while Jakob Kolding’s How to Build a Universe that Falls Apart Two Days Later (2014) analyzes planning versus completed architectural spaces. Encountering the City seeks to give visitors an insider’s view of the artists’ reactions to their own perceived architectural environments.
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On View> Inside the Palace of Fine Arts: Cosmopolitanism at the 1904 World’s Fair

Inside the Palace of Fine Arts: Cosmopolitanism at the 1904 World’s Fair Kemper Art Museum, Washington University 1 Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO Through August 3 As part of STL250, a region-wide celebration of the 250th anniversary of the founding of St. Louis, the Kemper Art Museum at Washington University presents Inside the Palace of Fine Arts: Cosmopolitanism at the 1904 World’s Fair. This exhibition brings together a selection of artworks from the Museum’s permanent collection that were on view at the 1904 Louisiana Purchase Exposition, along with related works, to explore the role of the World’s Fair in relation to local aspirations to turn the city into an international cultural center. The show features such artists as Jean Charles Cazin, Frederic Edwin Church, Charles François Daubigny, Narcisse Virgile Diaz de la Peña, and Jozef Israëls.
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On View> “On the Thresholds of Space-Making” at Washington University in St. Louis

On the Thresholds of Space-Making Sam Fox School, Washington University One Brookings Drive St. Louis, Missouri Through April 20 The work of Shinohara Kazuo (1925–2006), one of Japan’s most influential architects of the postwar generation, is surveyed in On the Thresholds of Space-Making. Shinohara gained popularity as an architect with his series of sublime purist houses designed over a thirty-year period that went through the 1980s. Shinohara scrutinized and reframed fundamental architectural conventions, such as public/private, body/space, and openness/enclosure. This exhibition contains original drawings and sketches that have rarely been seen outside of Japan. These drawings are enhanced by photographs of finished works and scaled models of imagined architecture. A featured work is Shinohara’s House in White (1964–66), in which he rearranges a familiar design palette—a square plan, a pointed roof, white walls, and a symbolic pillar—to give the main room almost oceanic spaciousness. His work has a poetic quality that combines simplicity and surprise. Also showcased in the exhibition is the enduring legacy of Shinohara’s work through projects by younger Japanese architects whom he influenced, including Toyo Ito (b. 1941); Ryue Nishizawa (b. 1966) of the firm SANAA; and Jun’ya Ishigami (b. 1974).