Posts tagged with "wallpaper":

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Product>Sumptuous and romantic textiles

There’s nothing like a bottle of cabernet by the fire to warm up a cold room, and the same goes for these au courant wine-hued textiles and wall coverings. Senza Titolo 04 Wallpepper

The giant abstract roses illustrated by Sofia Cacciapaglia are meant to evoke feelings of love and warmth. The resulting bouquet appears as if it is hand-painted on the wall thanks to being printed on smooth, PVC and heavy-metals-free paper.

Vinylife Fil Doux Textiles

A revolutionary vinyl textile, Vinylife contains a natural enzyme that reacts to microorganisms found in biologically active landfills and speeds up decomposition after the product’s lifecycle, making it a sustainable option. Vinylife is available in a variety of rich textures and is treated with Fil Doux’s proprietary ink-and-stain protectant, Pro-Tech.

Radicchio Farrow & Ball

One of Farrow & Ball’s key colors for spring 2017, Radicchio is a progression from the pink hues that have been so popular lately. Radicchio has a blue undertone that gives it an uplifting, bright quality, as opposed to other deep reds that might have a moodier feel.

Sangria Innovations

Innovations’ color of the year for 2017 is sangria, and the brand will be rolling out a wide selection of wall coverings that feature dark berry tones in a variety of woven textures, as well as vinyl and painted options.

Crosstown Donghia

A part of the Manhattan Muse collection, these fabrics are inspired by the things that make Manhattan unique (and named accordingly), like Skyline, Gridlock, and Bridges. The windowpane plaid of Crosstown is made in a luxe jacquard cotton and viscose velvet, available in eight colorways.

Architectural Reveal Bead Create sharp clean aesthetic reveals in a variety of sizes with up to " of built-in expansion protection. Form to curved walls without needing to be custom ordered.

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The Most Exciting Pieces from The AD Design Show

This year's Architectural Digest Design Show at Piers 92/94 was full of big-name brands with exciting tech innovations. However, a lot of the most exciting designs came from the AD Design Show's MADE section which featured juried galleries of more than 150 artists and designers from around the world.  León León's Acapulco chair isn't just stylish, it also happens to be made of Pineapple leather (yes, the fruit). The designers are the first brand in the world to utilize the fabric in a useable product. This hyperrealistic wallpaper from Flavor Paper comes in four mesmerizing color options. Each can make any office or home space feel balmy and tropical even in the dead of winter. Nobel Truong makes neon acrylic cacti sculptures and lamps that are wired with UV blacklight LEDs. They're perfect for those of us not gifted with a green thumb (even when it comes to succulents). Banner's Haven ergonomic chair is sculpted out of solid ash. They're available in black or white with leather or exotic calf hair upholstered seats. Sarkos wallpaper is entirely hand-painted and each panel is one-of-a-kind. The paint creates dazzling textures with shades that change depending on light. Everything at the Sony Life Space UX booth was exciting, from an incredibly high-definition Short throw projector to the portable version (seen above) that can be project on a wall, ceiling, or table. It can even fake a gorgeous view in a windowless room. There was also a stunning glass sound speaker that offers 360 degree non-directional clear sound. The most affordable product was a LED bulb speaker that can add music—and a warm glow—to any room. Miele's Generation 6000 dishwasher, in addition to being supremely quiet and efficient, can now be installed completely flush to the all—instead of a handle, just knock twice to open. Jennair offers fully integrated and wall-flush designs that come in a variety of options. One of their new features is an obsidian black interior that really makes food visually pop.
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Review> Jonathan Louie’s Big Will and Friends created visual delight with graphic wallpaper

ON VIEW - BIG WILL AND FRIENDS 01 Wallpaper is no longer the enhancement of choice in most contemporary domestic environments, but it emerges as the focal point of a recent installation in Syracuse, New York, designed by Jonathan Louie. ON VIEW - BIG WILL AND FRIENDS 02 The exhibition at the Roger Mack Gallery in the Shaffer Art Building at Syracuse University closed February 18th. Big Will and Friends was comprised of a 21-foot by 7-foot shotgun-style house tightly wrapped in scrim. The white scrim has been ornamented with an abstracted Morris & Co. wallpaper pattern—“Thistle,” designed by John Henry Dearle. The structure is constructed with PVC piping and custom-designed, three-dimensionally printed fittings. Adjacent to its long edge, the graphic adornment slipped off of the scrim envelope onto the floor and climbed up the neighboring gallery wall. This created an immersive, narrow corridor where visitors were enveloped in a heterogeneous tiling of the obscured and screened thistle arrangement. Louie’s particular abstraction of the Morris & Co. wallpaper balanced the mechanical with the manual, a strategy employed by William Morris in his early designs, where intricacy and elaboration were used to disguise repetition. ON VIEW - BIG WILL AND FRIENDS 03 “Since its domestic popularization, wallpaper design has leaned on its’ mechanistic structure and optical devices found in art practice: from the Flat Pattern to Visual Deceit to Forced Perspective; casting aside the material honesty of the wall for sham and show,” Louie claimed. In Big Will and Friends, the application amplified the ability for wallpaper to produce an aesthetic experience through its visual deceit. Louie’s installation maintained the decorative aspect of the conventional application of wallpaper, but reimagined this architectural element as a more ethereal and diaphanous material that produces a sensation of indeterminate depth and leads viewers to question the thickness and even the presence of the material. Of significance is the absolute legibility of the typical house form, used not only to host the featured element, but also to remind the viewer of the relationship between wallpaper and the domestic environment. The three-dimensional figure that comprises Big Will and Friends played into a larger generational interest in figural form where association to an external symbol—in this case, the single-family home—is prioritized over celebration of formal technique or material expression, and where graphic immediacy is privileged over prolonged and difficult visual access. ON VIEW - BIG WILL AND FRIENDS 04 Big Will and Friends is part of a larger body of research being developed by Jonathan Louie that explores the ability for conventional architectural elements to, through their reinterpretation and imagination, alter the visual experience of domestic environments and “flavor” our social relations. This body of research calls on architects to “embrace the temporal qualities of domestic decor that value appearance over substance, and the ephemeral over the secure and lasting.” Cumulatively, Louie’s work links art, architecture, and pop culture to suggest novel assemblies of conventional materials and everyday images. Jonathan Louie is an assistant professor within the School of Architecture at Syracuse University and co-director of Architecture Office. Louie recently took up residency in Peterborough, NH, as a MacDowell Colony Fellow. Big Will and Friends was made possible by generous support from the MacDowell Colony, Syracuse University School of Architecture, and Syracuse University College of Visual Performing Arts. Exhibition Design: Jonathan Louie with Gabriel Boyajian and Nicolas Carmona Installation Team: Staci Bobbi, Gabriel Boyajian, Chen Jung Kuo, Tom Arleo, Sarah Beaudoin, Scott Krabath, John Mikesh, and Trey Gegenfu Photography: Ioana Georgeta Turcan Video: Adam Greenberg Choreography: Stephanie White Music: “Bowspirit” by Balmorhea
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Product> Off The Wall: Sophisticated Wall Coverings

From recycled acoustic installations to intricate tile mosaics, the latest wall coverings are innovative, functional, and downright stylish. Xorel Artform Carnegie This high-performance wall paneling is available in over 200 colors and textures, with four different panel shapes that are each available in three sizes. Each panel is individually upholstered by hand using sustainable materials. The amount of highly personalized combinations allows for a range of uses in both residential and commercial spaces. Origami Akdo Akdo’s expertly cut marble tiles allow the veining on each piece to perfectly align with each other to create the illusion of a seamless line that looks folded like traditional Japanese origami. The patterns are offered in a choice of four warm taupe or cool gray colorways. Sakura Collection Fireclay Tile Hand painted on 70-percent recycled clay tiles, the Sakura Collection displays subtle earth toned hues that are derived from traditional Japanese landscapes, including patterns that resemble mountains, tortoise shells, and river rocks. They are available in eight-by-eight and six-by-twelve sizes. Dimensioni Collection New Ravenna Inspired by the Byzantine technique of placing gold pieces at certain angles to reflect light, the New Leaf tile mosaic is available in four color ways of metallic glass: platinum, rose gold, champagne gold, and gunmetal. In addition, the collection has two other modern mosaic designs inspired by the landscapes of Italy crafted in Italian marble. Tweed Mesh Cambridge Architectural Cambridge is known for its architectural mesh; it has recently released two new patterns, including a “tweed” mesh made with stainless steel and brass that resembles the weave of a classic wool overcoat—so much so that it has been used in several lounges for British Airways. Geo Wallpaper Direct Part of a larger collection of hyper-realistic photo paper by Ella Doran, this print is intended to capture texture and sunlight on solid architectural surfaces and adds a touch of glamour to smaller spaces without the bulk of using actual stone.
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Product> Innovative Wall Coverings

These innovative coverings do not sacrifice quality or efficiency for style. Modular and adaptable acoustic panels allow for a changing environment, and tie-dye inspired wallpapers translate decades old techniques into modern applications. Scale Layer Design A highly adaptable modular system, Scale is an acoustic partition that is intended to grow or shrink with an ever-evolving workplace. The system has a recycled aluminum stand and is comprised of injection molded recyclable ABS with pressed recycled hemp tiles available in multiple colors. Echopanel Kirei EchoPanel tiles are made out of 60-percent recycled plastic bottles, eco-friendly dyes, and no added adhesives—earning them a GreenTag certification. The tiles retain up to 85 percent of ambient noise and are endlessly customizable. There are more than 30 color options that can be printed with any image or laser-cut in a variety of shapes. Indigo Maya Romanoff Part of a limited edition collection inspired by Maya Romanoff’s studies in India and Southeast Asia in the late 60s, this pattern resembles a traditional fabric dying technique and is hand painted using indigo dyes on folded durable paper. Digital Imagery Moz Designs Designers can print custom photos on .040- to .090-inch thick aluminum with either a glossy or matte finish that can be used on many surfaces including walls, columns, and ceilings. Graphics can also be printed on solid core or perforated aluminum with a variety of special colors and gradients. Fade Walnut Wallpaper This beautiful peel-and-stick ombre tie-dye pattern is available in two colors and can be easily removed and replaced. It is also made of vinyl, which makes it ideal for areas with a lot of moisture. Banda Eskayel The tropics collection is designer Shanna Campanaro’s interpretation of beach motifs in Belize and Nicaragua. The prints are a modern take on traditional wallpaper motifs like toile, shibori, and palm leaves, and are available in a variety of color options.
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On View> The Graham Foundation presents “Chromatic Patterns” through April 5

Chromatic Patterns Graham Foundation 4 West Burton Place Chicago, IL Through April 5 Judy Ledgerwood’s Chromatic Patterns is a site-specific work that transforms the lower galleries of the Graham Foundation’s historic Madlener House in Chicago. The house was designed by Richard E. Schmidt and Hugh M. G. Garden and built in 1901–02. Judy Ledgerwood is a Chicago-based painter and educator. She is the recipient of numerous awards, including The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation Award, an Artadia Award, a Tiffany Award in the Visual Arts, a National Endowment for the Arts Award, and an Illinois Art Council Award. This exhibition surrounds the visitor in vibrant colors with a vibrant floral motif that almost mimics the house’s prairie style ornamentation. This installation examines the effect of paint on architecture, specifically the wall covering’s ability to produce new effects and feelings about a space. In this work, Ledgerwood uses ornamentation to change visitors’ perception of the ornamentation in the Madlener House’s lower galleries, highlighting the divergent ways that pattern, color, ornamentation, and surface have been coded, gendered, repressed, and embraced in art and architecture.
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Product> Warhol x Flavor Paper

For some, a portrait of Queen Elizabeth hearkens to days of "Long live the Queen!" but a recent design intervention could edit that phrase to "Long live Warhol!" Brooklyn-based Flavor Paper recently launched a collection of proprietary designs from the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts' store of works in PVC-free, water-based ink formats that can be customized for a variety of applications. Warhol produced eight of his own designs for wallpaper between 1966 and 1986—including the notable "Cows"—so the Foundation was especially selective when licensing reproductions in one of the artist's own mediums. "We walked through Flavor Paper's door, and knew that we had found the right fit," said Michael Hermann, The Andy Warhol Foundation for the ArtsDirector of Licensing. "We always saw licensing wallpaper as a compelling and complementary category, but until Flavor Paper had not found a collaborator who understood how to break through the constraints of such a traditional method." For Flavor Paper's founder and creative director, Jon Sherman, the creative light bulb went off in 2011, when the company worked with the Montclair Art Museum to finalize designs and produce the "Twelve Cars" wallpaper series for the exhibition Warhol and Cars: American Icons. "As a true Warhol enthusiast, this opportunity for me personally is like a fantasy fulfilled," Sherman said of the new collection. "Working with the Foundation's team to celebrate and interpret Warhol's work in our own inimitable style is a milestone for the brand." Nine styles were produced from a cache of Warhol's silkscreen prints, photographs, and other iconic images. Flavor Paper uses water-based inks produced for billboard applications, so each sheet of paper is durable and light fast. This mural option, also available in Sailboat, is based on Warhol's 1962 paint-by-number series. Each mural is scaled to fit application dimensions. A recurring pattern was developed from a 1955 Newswire photograph of St. Peter's Square in Rome on Easter Sunday. Flavor Paper's Sherman inserted an image of Warhol, for a tongue-in-cheek "Where's Waldo?" effect. The pattern comes in four standard colorways with the option for customization. Based on Warhol's 1964 silkscreen of hibiscus blooms, a repeating pattern is digitally rendered in four colorways on a chrome mylar base. In a nod to Warhol's very personal practice of embellishing his oxidation paintings, random splashes of toner make each pattern truly unique. Flavor Paper organizes Warhol's Inkblot paintings for unique adaptions on a damask pattern. Four color combinations on high-gloss or textured papers, like ponyskin and linen, add to the pattern's luxe appearance. Layered and repeating photos of Halston-designed shoes from the 1980s are available in four colors, with options for customization. Drella, (pictured), features a glitter impregnated vinyl that closely resembles Warhol's own Diamond Dust treatment.
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On View> “Thomas Bayrle: Chrysler Tapete” Opens September 6 at the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis

Thomas Bayrle: Chrysler Tapete Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis 3750 Washington Blvd, St. Louis, MO September 6, 2013 to October 27, 2013 From September 6 to October 27, the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis and chief curator Dominic Molon present Chrysler Tapete (1970) as part of the institution’s ongoing Front Room program. One of a series of wallpaper works that German artist Thomas Bayrle has produced since the late 1960s, Chrysler Tapete features the repeated image of an automobile until its distinctiveness subsides into a colossal collectiveness. The purpose is to signify the tension between positive, shared experiences and the feeling of oppressive uniformity. Bayrle, a leader in European Pop Art—frequently referred to as Grey Pop—continues to experiment with painting, sculpture, fashion, and graphic design and currently lives and works in Frankfurt am Main, Germany. Through solo and group exhibitions, his objective is to uncover how our society of mass production and consumption influences our understanding of the world. Bayrle investigates how physical space, scale, and pattern influence the observer. Chrysler Tapete, consisting of silkscreen print on paper, has an intense visual presence that provides visitors with a new way to experience the exhibition space itself, a fitting role as the installation coincides with the tenth anniversary of the Contemporary Art Museum’s building.
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Q+A> Todd Oldham and Designtex Revive the Wildlife Delights of Charley Harper

At the NeoCon contract furnishings trade show in June, AN executive editor Alan G. Brake sat down with Todd Oldham to discuss the collection of wall coverings he developed for Designtex adapting the work of Charley Harper. Harper is arguably best known as an illustrator, but Oldham is working with the Charley Harper Studio to broaden Harper’s reputation and create new products using his menagerie of images of flora and fauna. A versatile designer of fashion, home furnishings, books, and objects, Oldham has a special interest in reviving midcentury designers and he previously worked with the Alexander Girard archive. AN: Tell us about your interest in Charley Harper. Todd Oldham: I had the great pleasure of knowing Mr. Harper for the last five years of his life. He was an amazing, magical man. I came to know his work when I was a kid. He did the illustrations for a book called the Golden Book of Biology, which was my biology text book in school.  I loved it. So many years later  I reconnected things and found him and forced my way in—he was very gracious about it So you were a design stalker. Yes, I was a design stalker. I don’t do that very often, but I’m in awe of Charley. It’s a dangerous thing to meet your heroes, but not in this case. It was wonderful. What about his work drew you to him, beginning all those years ago? The things that drew me to his work when I was five are the same things that I love now, which is his ability to communicate complex information to the most…I don’t want to say simplest form because that suggests it’s diminished, which it’s not…he was able to boil something down to the zeitgeist and never lose one morsel of it. It’s really something. How did the collection come together? Well, Susan Lyons is now the big cheese over here at Designtex, and I’d worked with her before on a project on Alexander Girard when she was at HermanMiller, so when this opportunity came up, we always wanted to try to find a partner to bring his work to life in a new way. We’re very excited about this opportunity. We are always true to Charley’s designs. A lot of times when you are working with other designers, the Eames or Girard, you have a lot of objects you can bring forward. In Charley’s case, he was an artist, so you only have flat things, so making him live in the world in another way, you have to make sure they still represent Charley and what he was about. This medium with Designtex was just perfect. We’re sitting here by the ladybugs, and ladybugs were always very dear to Charley, I think because of their graphic quality. In the early 1970s a Chinese beetle came over—and was known as the orange ladybug—it became a garden pest, Charley was very upset because his beloved creature was being maligned, so he always said, these are the bugs that bug no one, so the ladybug was always very near and dear to him. This was actually painted on the outside of his house in the early 60s and it remained there until weather took it off. It was replaced in the early 1990s. The mosaic that we walked past is an exact replica of the one that was done in the federal building in Cincinnati. It done was in one inch tiles, either whole tiles or bifurcated, and sometimes you’ll see the extensions—either the legs or antennae—were done in glass or plexi-glass inserted into the grout. In a repeatable image it had to be moved around a little bit, but all the colors, all the forms, the scale are all exact. Why was Designtex the right company to make these wall coverings? They’re coming at it from the right place, a very thoughtful place. They’re also trying to make the most conscious decisions about the manufacturing that they can. Charley was an early ecologist. He did amazing bumper stickers in the late 60s that said, “You otter care about water,” and it had a little otter on it. These things were very important for him. Since we represent the estate, going against what was important to him would be blasphemous. Are there other treasures in the estate that will have other lives in future collections? With Charley, they’re all treasures. There is no bad work, no off work. It’s just stunning throughout. Our biggest obstacle was editing it down. I like where we landed with this project, but this is just a sneak preview of what’s to come. This tile-based mural is one of my favorites. It’s very unusual that it’s in a Federal Building. It’s not easy to get access, so I begged and begged for hours. It’s a in a public space but in a building you can’t get into. It’s amazing. It’s over 50 feet of non-repeating images. There’s another that’s based on Charley’s representation of birch bark. Charley had this amazing sort of cubist take on birch bark. That reminds me of your work. My color scheme has been fully informed by Charley, way before I ever knew why. I like those odd colors, the printing techniques. We’re really excited to be debuting with these wall coverings, which are durable enough for healthcare applications. Wouldn’t it be nice to be recovering and wakeup under one of Charley’s ladybugs? Do you have any other archival projects in the works, after Girard and Harper? I do, but I can’t talk about it yet. It’s not a designer, it’s a photographer. But I can’t say just yet.