Posts tagged with "Timber":

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Seven wood surfaces to “spruce up” any room

From carbon-zero hardwood to pine designed by Kengo Kuma, these interior surfaces bring you the best in new wood surfacing.

Burn Rustic Solid Pine - Vertical Collection Havwoods International Designed as interior cladding for walls and ceilings, Havwoods’ Vertical Collection of reclaimed solid pine planks and panels were milled to produce a seamless, interlocking system. Now available in an almost-obsidian hue, the new stain adds an air of darkness in both diagonal and straight configurations.

Futura Sound Fractal Wall Panels Plyboo

Futura Sound by Smith & Fong is a modular system of acoustic bamboo panels featuring geometric motifs that, when combined, diffuse sound. Plyboo offers the collection in a handful of charming monotone hues, from soft maple to warm birch to gray ash.

Coco Palm Plywood and Veneer Durapalm

Characterized by deep, rich mahogany tones and gritty, natural graining, these planks made from coconut palm trees are perfect for both commercial and residential applications. From somber gray to aggressive beige, Durapalm offers a variety of colors in plywood and veneer.

Jungle Mix Solid Hardwood Whole Forest

These hardwood planks are actually carbon negative, meaning that the wood Whole Forest sources from Ecuador is from 30 to 50 tropical tree species in a forest that’s kept sustainably intact. Put simply, large amounts of carbon are prevented from being released into the atmosphere through long-term conservation efforts. Available in a range of eclectic finishes, Jungle Mix flooring can be mixed and matched to create completely nontoxic flooring and walling.

Handcrafted Collection Nydree Flooring

Nydree combined marine-grade birch core with an acrylic finish to create real hardwood flooring that is ideal for high traffic areas. Perfect for those buildings that want or already have LEED standard certification, the benzophenone-free lamination actually strengthens the flooring by making it more dent-resistant than standard wood. The Handcrafted Collection is made by hand in both white oak and walnut.

Maritime Pine by Kengo Kuma ALPI

Japanese architect Kengo Kuma teamed up with Italian wood veneer manufacturer ALPI on a collection that emulates the ruggedness of pine native to the Mediterranean. Accentuated with deep cracks and “natural” irregularities in the veining, the bark design looks like it has a life force of its own.

Aromatic Cedar Columbia Forest Products

Bye-bye pests and mildew! Cedar protects kitchens, pantries, basements, and indoor spaces alike from odors with its inherent natural properties (especially its scent). Columbia Forest Products ¼-inch-by-4-feet-by-8-feet aromatic cedar plywood panels are offered in both mirrored and symmetrical styles.

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California launches statewide Mass Timber Building Competition

Timber construction is on a roll, whether it be in Olympic stadiums or high-rise residences. Codes are changing as more municipalities embrace mass timber and the industry shifts away from concrete. Not to be left out, California is holding a Mass Timber Building Competition. The California Government Operations Agency (GovOps) is hosting the competition, and WoodWorks – Wood Products Council, an organization that offers free guidance for designers using timber, will be administering the program. As GovOps notes, California is one of the largest consumers of engineered wood products in the country, but almost none of it is harvested or produced in the state. At a time when the buildup of forest density in California has contributed to an ever-worsening fire season already acerbated by climate change, GovOps is pitching this competition as a chance to kill two birds with one stone. Interested parties in California—including real estate developers, designers, institutions, and other organizations—have until March 18, 2019, to submit a proposal. GovOps is going big and is only accepting proposals for multistory, 10,000-square-foot-plus mixed-use, commercial, industrial, institutional, or multi-unit housing projects. Preference will be given to projects over 100,000 square feet that clear six stories. A full list the competition guidelines are available here, and it looks like proposals will be evaluated on cost as well as “narrative” in an attempt to create thoughtful applications of timber. WoodWorks will also be available to offer guidance to entrants on both feasibility as well as design. The two (or possibly more) winning teams will split a $500,000 grant to continue their research into developing repeatable, sustainable, and affordable timber construction.
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These low-maintenance decking options can weather the most extreme climates

From recycled composite boards to raw timber panels, these wooden decking solutions are strong and made to last.

Mahogany Wood Tiles Bison Innovative Products Bison’s Mahogany Wood Tiles are fashioned from hardwood sourced from government-regulated plantations in the Fiji Islands and are FSC-certified. After being harvested, the tiles are manufactured in Vietnam, where, if desired, they can be stained to match existing interior flooring or a particular color. Exterior Cladding Richlite Hold on to your hats, but we have big news—Richlite is actually made from 100 percent recycled, resin-infused paper! Richlite manufactures skatepark ramps, musical instruments, and exterior cladding and decking from the same material. Incredibly durable, Richlite is similar to hardwood with a densely layered composition that is both water- and fire-resistant.
ExoTile Wood Deck Tiles Nova Formed using nine 3-inch-by-1-inch boards of matching hardwood, Nova’s 24-inch-by-24-inch tiles are offered in Batu and Ipe wood. Each tile is secured with a clip system that prevents sagging. Both wood species are perfect for residential or commercial applications. Black Locust Hardwoods of Wisconsin Ideal for patios and outdoor areas alike, Black Locust makes for a permeable paver with a raised-joint interlocking system that allows water to slip through and drain away. Left unstained, it will last up to 100 years and develop a naturally occurring silvery gray patina.
Black Walnut Robi Decking Robi’s Black Walnut Decking is characterized by gritty wood grains that cause naturally occurring contrasts in color. It is available unfinished for a raw look and oiled to achieve a more polished appearance. Skyline Series Sylvanix Outdoor Products Made from recycled plastic and wood, Sylvanix’s composite decking lasts longer than traditional lumber. Each plank features two patterns, natural wood grain on one side and a line motif carved into the other. The Skyline Series is available in two neutral colors: teak and graphite.
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International Code Council moves to embrace taller mass timber buildings

This article originally appeared as part of our January 2019 print issue in the timber feature. After over two years of testing and several rounds of deliberation, the International Code Council (ICC) has settled on a batch of modest code changes that will embrace tall timber buildings in the United States. The changes are due to take effect in 2021, after approval from ICC’s Ad Hoc Committee on Tall Wood Buildings (TWB) in December 2018. The 18-member TWB group is made up of fire, concrete, steel, gypsum, and wood specialists as well as architects, engineers, and code officials from around the country who have been working to craft the new codes and prove that tall wood structures can be built safely. Current regulations allow mass timber construction for only six-story structures and under, although a handful of taller mass timber buildings have been built internationally, including the 18-story Brock Commons Tallwood House in Vancouver, Canada, among others. The officials conducted research and performed multiple fire tests—including controlled burns of five two-story CLT structures at the National Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives in Baltimore—to back the safety of their proposed changes. The new regulations, aside from officially defining mass timber construction types and specifying minimum dimensions for timber elements, will also include three additional construction types in the “heavy timber” (Type IV) category—dubbed “IVA,” “IVB,” and “IVC”—that establish building codes for 18-, 12-, and 9-story mass timber buildings, respectively. In 2018, Washington State became took the lead by incorporating tall timber codes into its building codes. Seattle-based architect and mass timber specialist Susan Jones of atelierjones spent two and a half years crafting these new standards with the TWB committee. As an architect who has spent ample time proving the safety of mass timber construction on a project-by-project basis, Jones welcomes the new regulations as a potential jumping-off point that might allow for even taller timber structures in the future. “The codes are solid and very conservative, given the performance the material showed,” Jones said. “But we had to start somewhere.”
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CRÈME proposes floating timber bridge to connect Brooklyn and Queens

Currently the only link between the rapidly developing neighborhoods of Long Island City, Queens, and Greenpoint, Brooklyn, is the Pulaski Bridge, a six-lane drawbridge with a narrow pathway where pedestrians and bikers jostle for space. Brooklyn-based CRÈME/Jun Aizaki Architecture & Design wants to change that by proposing the LongPoint Bridge, a 250-foot-long crossing dedicated to foot and bike traffic.

The bridge is distinguished from its counterparts across the city for its lightweight, floating timber construction. It is anchored on either end by a concrete and steel mast embedded into the waterbed of Newtown Creek (the East River canal that divides Queens and Brooklyn). Glulam beams joined by galvanized steel braces and pins rise in two trussed peaks of armature around the nearly 50-foot-tall masts. The structure is a nod to the area’s industrial past and present while also referencing the iconic profiles of other bridges in the city. Its height above the canal allows smaller vessels to pass underneath, but for larger boats, the bridge pivots open in the middle, with each section moving on propeller-driven pontoons. This floating feature also allows the bridge to rise and fall with the tides.

According to Jun Aizaki, the firm’s founder and principal, the bridge’s design and timber composition allows it to be assembled off-site and installed quickly and inexpensively; in the long term, it will require only minimal repairs. CRÈME also proposes public parks and loading docks to flank the bridge on both ends, along with a pedestrian crossing over the Long Island Railroad commuter rails just beyond the canal. Together with the timber bridge, the pathway would connect commuters to the G and 7 trains on either side.

With the impending L train shutdown in 2019 and the predicted growth of Long Island City as it hosts Amazon’s HQ2, the timing of a quickly constructed, relatively affordable bridge seems ideal. Aizaki and his team, which includes a community organizer, are busy raising support and funds through meetings with public officials and local community members. For Aizaki, the bridge is intended as “a grassroots, rather than developer-initiated, project,” which he hopes will “be a symbol of something the community can be proud of."

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Shigeru Ban Architects burnishes its status as a leader in mass timber

Histories of innovation in modern building materials typically recount how muscular substances are sculpted in the hands of masters: Eiffel and his iron, Corb and his concrete, Gehry and his shiny titanium scales. Shigeru Ban Architects (SBA), on the other hand, has sought out some of the less heroic products of our age, sometimes using trash as inspiration for the next big thing in structural solutions; the firm works with humble materials, but its final creations are no less accomplished for it. Wood is one of these seemingly humdrum materials that SBA has long played with, but in the past decade or so, it has skillfully taken advantage of the material’s flexibility. SBA is quite literally taking timber structures to new heights, and is currently at work on both the tallest hybrid timber structure and the largest mass timber development in the world. With work around the world, the firm has pushed the possibilities of what glulam, cross-laminated timber, and other wood products can do—both formally and functionally—proving to skeptical local administrators that timber is a material that can meet and even exceed their building codes. It’s not every firm that has clients with the appetite to replicate some of SBA’s more adventurous projects, but still, the firm has some basic advice for working with timber: Dean Maltz, the partner in charge of SBA’s New York office, said that “timber forces you to collaborate with trades closely,” which, he stressed, is both a challenge and an opportunity. Because mass timber products are prefabricated off-site and still something of an anomaly in much of the United States, it is crucial from the beginning of the design process to work with experienced fabricators. That early investment in collaboration can pay off later, though—Maltz claimed that even the firm’s more complex timber designs were built much faster than comparable steel or concrete structures because timber components can be prefabricated with incredible dimensional precision. The firm’s use of timber is not arbitrary—rather, it uses wood tactically, albeit sometimes extravagantly, to meet aesthetic and practical goals. While international building codes can be something of a jungle when it comes to mass timber, SBA is blazing trails through the wilderness. Aspen Art Museum The Aspen Art Museum, which is essentially a big-box building, doesn’t go wild with formal gyrations. Instead, for this low-key Rocky Mountain ski town, SBA let the structure steal the show. A basket-woven wooden screen dapples circulation spaces along the perimeter with Colorado sun, and the firm’s trademark paper tubes make an appearance as playful interior walls and seating. But the firm’s ingenuity really shines in the massive exposed timber roof truss. The space frame–like system is cleverly composed of interlocking planar timber members that curve gently at corners, a detail that allows components to be joined by a single fastener. The resulting mesh allows light to filter down to the spaces below while bolstering the roof against the winter snowfall. Kentucky Owl Park SBA’s most recent commission in the U.S. is for a 420-acre distillery and recreational campus themed after Kentucky Owl bourbon. Like much of the firm’s work, the park’s design blends bold geometry with nods to historical motifs and materials: While the trio of identically sized pyramids at the center of the complex contrasts with the surrounding big sky bluegrass landscape, these exposed timber structures are redolent of 19th-century metalwork, the kind that might have enlivened the original Kentucky Owl distillery. Further, wood columns will be girded by metal loops as in traditional barrel construction, and trusses webbed with curves and loops will add a stylized flourish. Swatch Headquarters and Omega Facilities SBA’s forthcoming trio of Swiss buildings for a pair of watch manufacturers (sister companies under the Swatch Group) are a study in contrasts. The new production facilities for Omega are rectilinear and formal, structured by a precisely gridded matrix of exposed engineered timber. The new Swatch headquarters, however, snakes along the Suze River under an arched wood canopy that is punctuated by periodic distortions before leaping across a street to connect to the joint Swatch-Omega Museum, also designed by SBA. Upon its completion later this year, the complex will be the largest timber development in the world. Shonai Hotel Suiden Terrasse No single SBA project displays the versatility and formal possibilities of hybrid timber structures as much as the Shonai Hotel Suiden Terrasse, completed in September 2018 in northern Japan. The hotel’s spa sits under a low dome supported by timber beams spectacularly interwoven in the same pattern used in La Seine Musicale, while the hotel itself showcases a sober mix of timber, concrete, and brick components. But in a shared central building, a long, open space is covered with a thin pleated wood roof that floats as though it were nothing more than a piece of folded paper.
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Wood cladding products that can stand the test of time

Design facades that can endure the elements and look better with time. These exterior wood claddings offer sustainability, durability, and a touch of charm.

WOODWORKS Linear Solid Wood Panels Exterior Armstrong Ceiling & Wall Solutions

Available in six custom finishes and stains, WOODWORKS Linear Solid Wood Panels are made of western hemlock. The 12-inch-by-96-inch linear panels attach to Armstrong’s Prelude EL Exterior system via screw fasteners. Perfect for creating seamless indoor-to-outdoor transitions, the exterior panels are designed to withstand the elements and are great for overhang and soffit applications.

Thermowood Lunawood

Made by glue-laminating panels of Scandinavian pine together, Lunawood’s cladding boards are made in a thermal manufacturing process where wood is processed using only heat and steam, a technique nearly as natural as the wood itself. Available in planks with horizontal or vertical textures, the natural brown color of the wood can be retained using a surface finish or left untreated to patina.

Exterior Wood Cladding Accoya

Made of durable New Zealand-sourced pine, Exterior Wood Cladding is optimal for both large-scale commercial projects and detail-oriented residential designs. Accoya’s external wood siding is extremely durable, and it is available custom profiled to fit specific building designs and specifications.

Alu Siding Technowood

Pairing the charming aesthetic qualities of wood with the strength and resilience of aluminum, Technowood’s aluminum panels are laminated with natural wood veneers. Using less wood than typical siding applications, AluSiding is environmentally sustainable, lightweight, and recyclable.

Nature – Pure FunderMax

Characterized by the clearly defined lines naturally occurring in solid wood, Pure is FunderMax’s new color collection in its Nature collection wood-based cladding. Stark yet soft in its straightforward design, Pure is offered in four thicknesses and six finishes.

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Looking for a log? Buy a big one and support disaster recovery

Is there anything better than a really large piece of wood? The answer, obviously, is no, there is not, which makes the rarity (and expense) of such pieces that much more painful. But the Coastal Marine Resource Center and Local Office Landscape and Urban Design (LOLA) have teamed up to find a way to bring large-format lumber to the masses and help people recover from natural disasters while they're at it. Here's the skinny: when Hurricane Michael tore through Florida late last year, it brought down massive live oak trees across the Panhandle. Some of those trees damaged homes and property and need to be cleared away, and those trees are also a source of hardwood on a scale not commonly found on the market today. The pair of organizations is arranging for the sale of that hardwood and is sending all of the proceeds to Solar Libre Puerto Rico, a group installing solar systems on the island in the wake of Hurricane Maria. Orders of live oak are only available by the truckload at a cost of about $50,000 to $60,000, but the organizers say that they invite potential purchasers to pool smaller orders together. Available sizes go all the way up to 20 feet by 4 feet. Those interested may contact LOLA here.
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UK implements a flammable cladding ban, but hits timber too

After a fire ravaged the Grenfell tower block in Western London last June, killing 72 and leaving hundreds homeless, an in-depth investigation was launched into the cause of the fire and why it spread so rapidly. After fire specialists BRE Global pointed the finger at the combustible cladding used in the tower’s most recent renovation, England acted to implement a ban on combustible cladding in new structures—a ban that includes timber. The original Clifford Wearden and Associates–designed tower was built in 1974 with passive fire prevention in mind. However, a 2016 renovation (reportedly to beautify the housing block to improve the views from the wealthier neighborhoods to the south and east) clad the concrete building in combustible polyethylene-cored aluminum panels. Alleged incompetence on the part of the contractors also created a “chimney effect” wherein flames were able to travel upwards through the gap between the structure and flammable panels. These revelations led the UK’s Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government to declare a ban on combustible external cladding for new buildings over 59 feet tall and those that contain housing. Hospitals, dorms, schools, and residential towers would all be affected. The ban goes into effect on December 21, a full 17 months after the fire. The ban, which would also affect retrofits, effectively limits the materials that can be used as exterior cladding to steel, stone, glass, and others with a European fire rating of Class A1 or A2. After the final terms of the ban were revealed, the Architects’ Journal reported that London’s Waugh Thistleton Architects, of cross-laminated timber (CLT) proponents, spoke out against the restriction of timber in high rises. Other than slowing the research and development of engineered timber, the ban would disallow the use of a low-carbon cladding alternative. On the other hand, the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA), has seemingly embraced the ban. Adrian Dobson, RIBA director of professional services, released the following statement shortly after the ban was first announced: “It is good news that the Government has acted on the RIBA’s recommendations to ban combustible cladding on high-rise residential buildings over 18m. The ban needs to be accompanied by clear guidance and effective enforcement to promote fire safety and leave no room for cutting corners. “However, toxic smoke inhalation from the burning cladding very likely contributed to the disproportionately high loss of life at the Grenfell Tower disaster. Permitting all products classified as A2 does not place any limits on toxic smoke production and flaming particles/droplets. In our view, this is not an adequate response to the tragic loss of life and might still put the public and the Fire and Rescue authorities at unnecessary risk.”
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Google fills a historic timber hangar with its sleek new Los Angeles office

The Spruce Goose, a derogatory nickname for the Hughes H-4 Hercules, only flew once, but the largest plane ever built (entirely out of wood, to boot) continues to live on in pop culture ephemera. The plane has found a permanent home in Oregon’s Evergreen Aviation Museum, but the Los Angeles hangar where the Spruce Goose was built is getting a second shot at life. Under the timber hangar’s four-story-tall roof, ZGF Architects has completed a voluminous open office for Google that celebrates the building’s aeronautical heritage. Inside the 450,000-square-foot Playa Vista space, ZGF has restored the building’s historic Douglas fir “spine,” a series of curved ribs that support the ceiling, using wood salvaged from the hangar. Any leftover wood was used for furniture throughout the office. The Spruce Goose hangar was the largest timber building in the world when it was completed, and ZGF and engineers Arup mostly kept true to that legacy by scattering wooden finishes throughout and leaving the ceiling exposed. An enormous ship-like structure at the office’s core anchors the circulation routes and staircases to each floor, and according to ZGF, creates a “unique building-within-a-building design.” The hangar had largely laid dormant until Google took it over as a tenant, though in the past it’s served as a soundstage for films like Titanic and Avatar. In renovating such a cavernous space, ZGF punched skylights throughout the 750-foot-long building’s roof to maximize the amount of incoming daylight. The office space also features plenty of aviation-themed conference rooms, a fitness center, cafes, a 250-person event space, and aerial boardwalks that connect the first, second, and third floors. A “perception sculpture” made up of 2,800 hanging steel balls has been installed in the central atrium, that, when viewed from a specific angle, reveals the airy shape of the Spruce Goose plane. The references to Howard Hughes’s and the site’s place in aviation history is also celebrated throughout with placards and stories about the building, the Spruce Goose, Google, and L.A. Although Google has approximately 1,000 employees in the city, it’s unclear how many will work out of the Spruce Goose office. ZGF is no stranger to designing for tech giants and is currently part of the team renovating Microsoft's Redmond campus. “Los Angeles is an ideal home for Google’s newest office,” said L.A. Mayor Eric Garcetti, who was on hand for a tour of the building over the weekend. “Our city is a hub of innovation, creativity, and homegrown talent that shaped the aerospace industry in the past and that’s redefining the tech sector today. “Expanding Google’s presence in Playa Vista connects an historic building with our dynamic future, a site that will serve as a hotbed of scientific excellence and economic success for years to come.”
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Knotted installation proposes ways to reduce timber waste

When a tree is harvested for wood, what happens to the pieces that aren’t ramrod straight? An installation designed by Cornell University’s Robotic Construction Laboratory (RCL) proposes an answer to that question and has used robotic fabrication to build a self-supporting structure from rejected wood cuts. LOG KNOT was commissioned as part of Cornell’s Council for the Arts 2018 Biennial and installed on Cornell’s Agriculture Quad on August 22 of 2018, where it will remain until December 8. The theme of this year’s Biennial is “Duration: Passage, Persistence, Survival." The closed-loop form of LOG KNOT, the interplay of a traditional material, wood, and a high-tech fabrication process, and the eventual silvering of the structure’s untreated timber, all directly address those points. On an AN visit to Cornell’s main Ithaca campus, RCL director Sasa Zivkovic (also of HANNAH) walked up and down the structure to demonstrate its strength. LOG KNOT was formed by harvesting irregular trees that would be normally passed over from Cornell’s Arnot Teaching and Research Forest, 3-D scanning each, and using their shapes to design a self-tensioning structure. Using a CNC mill, the logs were then cut into segments that would optimize the amount of stress they would experience, and joining notches were cut into each end. Thanks to the precision of the computer-controlled mill, the final structure was erected in-situ by hand, says Zivkovic. The RCL team was able to install LOG KNOT by having one person hold up a log segment while the next bolted it into place, all without the use of a crane. The final effect is of a single extruded log, even though LOG KNOT was built using two different species of wood. Only 35 percent of the wood taken from most trees is used in construction, typically the tree’s straight trunk. LOG KNOT, much as with the wooden portion of HANNAH’s forthcoming Corbel-Bacon Cabin in Ithaca, was built by using the natural contours of the trees to form the structure. While LOG KNOT may be a temporary installation, ultimately the RCL wants to use the same technique to cut back on wood waste in a way that creates aesthetic possibilities.
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This British mosque is structured with a flowering wooden lattice

In Cambridge, England, Marks Barfield Architects (MBA) is erecting a timber-structured mosque inspired by geometric design and landscaping found throughout the Islamic world.

The Cambridge Mosque Project, founded by Dr. Timothy Winter in 2008, purchased the one-acre site in 2009. Allées of cypress and linden trees ring the mosque, which occupies a symmetrical 27-feet-by-27-feet grid. The new house of worship will be able to accommodate approximately 1,000 worshippers.

In a statement to The Guardian, the deceased architect David Marks viewed the project as a shift from the “preponderance of Ottoman mosques” found throughout the United Kingdom. MBA saw an opportunity to design an Islamic center unique to the British community, with a massing similar to the surrounding Georgian terraces, featuring a height of three stories, brick elevations, and a subtle dome rather than a towering minaret.

For the project, MBA reached out to Swiss timber-construction specialist Blumer–Lehmann AG (BLA). Thirty free-form timber columns, built of curved glue-laminated beams, form the primary support structure of the Cambridge mosque. Each column flowers into a network of latticed arches and beams that is topped with a lightweight, 20,000 square-foot timber roof. Rows of circular skylights are embedded above the supporting columns, allowing for the significant diffusion of natural light throughout the prayer space.

Design-to-Production (DP), a Zurich-based firm at the forefront of building information modeling, was commissioned by BLA to optimize the timber structural system’s geometry, establish a pre-fabrication and assembly strategy, and develop a comprehensive 3-D model of the project.

Through parametric design, DP whittled down the project’s 6,000 structural joints to just 145 different timber parts. Then the firm plugged in their digital fabrication data to a 5-axis CNC milling machine to mass-produce the timber components along with pre-assembly instructions and drawings. After being transported 900 miles over land and sea to the United Kingdom, the components were assembled in under a month.

The onion-dome, with a base of arched clerestory windows, reaches a height of 30 feet and is placed atop the truss system made of glue-laminated beams.

Construction for the project should wrap up in 2018 and will open in January 2019.