Posts tagged with "Theaster Gates":

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IDEAS CITY announces 41 fellows and public programing

IDEAS CITY has announced the names of 41 International Fellows to participate in an Intensive Studio Laboratory Program during the April 25-30 event in Detroit. Selected from over 800 applicants, the Fellows will work in the Herman Kiefer Complex—a former hospital complex in Virginia Park. The five-day charrette will culminate in a day long public program of presentations and talks. The Fellows are made up of emerging practitioners who are working at the intersection of community activism, art, design, and technology. Director of IDEAS CITY Joseph Grima stated in a press release, “IDEAS CITY Detroit will gather forty-one extraordinary individuals to tackle specific challenges facing the city. We’re incredibly excited to have the opportunity to learn from Detroit, to deploy a collective intelligence model based on arts and culture, and to further exchange with the community. The city is in the process of reinventing itself and, once again, is on the verge of transforming our understanding of the modern metropolis. Detroit is a laboratory for a new paradigm of urbanity.” The Fellows named are Joe Ahearn, Taylor Renee Aldridge, Ava Ansari, Hallie Applebaum, Leonardo Aranda, Nick Axel, Merve Bedir, Francesca Berardi, Beverly Chou, Carolyn Concepcion, Gabriela Córdoba, Afaina de Jong, Pınar Demirdağ, Fataah Dihaan, Shaida Ghomashchi, Jon Gray, Kunal Gupta, Tommy Haddock, Jason Hilgefort, Ekene Ijeoma, Tamara Jafar, Stacy’e Jones, Toms Kokins, Cindy Lin, Monty Luke, Daanish Masood, Tiff Massey, Jose R. Mejia, Cara Michell, Marsha Music, Ryan Myers-Johnson, Claire Nowak-Boyd, Evelina Ozola, Paolo Patelli, Margarita Pournara, Jay Rayford, Unai Reglero, Alethea Rockwell, Ruhi Shamim,  Giuditta Vendrame, and Nikolas Ventourakis. The April 30 public event will include the Fellows as well as talks by New York Magazine writer Rembert Browne, Chicago artist Theaster Gates, City of Chicago’s Department of Cultural Affairs  Commissioner Michelle T. Boone, architect Walter Hood, and artist/architect Amanda Williams, and more. The event will be held at the Jam Handy, a former film studio for car commercials located at 2900 East Grand Boulevard. IDEAS CITY is an international initiative to promote arts and culture as vital parts of healthy future cities. It was co-founded by Lisa Phillips, Toby Devan Lewis Director, and Karen Wong, Deputy Director, the New Museum, and is directed by Joseph Grima.   2016–17 Schedule IDEAS CITY Detroit: April 25–30, 2016 IDEAS CITY Athens: September 19–25, 2016, in partnership with NEON Foundation IDEAS CITY Arles: May 22–27, 2017, presented by the New Museum, LUMA Arles, and LUMA IDEAS CITY New York: Fall 2017   IDEAS CITY Detroit Public Conference Saturday April 30, 2016 The Jam Handy 2900 East Grand Boulevard Detroit, MI 48202   11:15–11:30 AM: Welcome Address by IDEAS CITY, Maurice Cox, and Rembert Browne   11:30 AM–1 PM: Session 1 Opening Keynote by Theaster Gates Talk by Amanda Williams Panel Discussion with Michelle T. Boone, Theaster Gates, Jenny Lee, and Amanda Williams Presentations by Studio Laboratory Fellows   1:30–3 PM: Session 2 Opening Keynote by dream hampton Panel Discussion with Rembert Browne, Halima Cassells, dream hampton, and Sonya S. Mays Presentations by Studio Laboratory Fellows   3:30–7 PM: Session 3 Opening Keynote by Walter Hood Talk by Bryan Boyer Panel Discussion with Kunlé Adeyemi, Bryan Boyer, Ellie Abrons/T+E+A+M, and Walter Hood Presentations by Studio Laboratory Fellows Screening by Liam Young
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On View> Theaster Gates' Stony Island Arts Bank showing art and architecture in Chicago

Stony Island Arts Bank 6760 South Stony Island Avenue, Chicago Carlos Bunga, Under the Skin, through January 3 Frida Escobedo, Materials Reservoir, through January 3 The Stony Island Arts Bank is a project of Chicago-based artist Theaster Gates’ nonprofit Rebuild Foundation. The foundation converted a vacant former savings bank on the South Side into an archive, exhibition space, and community center to encourage artist-led, community-driven revitalization. Current programming includes works by Barcelona-based multimedia artist Carlos Bunga, and architect Frida Escobedo (Mexico City). For Under the Skin, Bunga uses cardboard and adhesive tape to create a fluid space that responds to the surrounding architecture and comments on the making process. For Materials Reservoir, Escobedo gathered debris from a demolished South Side church to create a reverse Tower of Babel, with walls that can be re-arranged and destroyed. The piece comments on how meaning and materiality can be appropriated and constructed by each participant.  
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Theaster Gates’ 'Sanctum,' a 552-hour continuous performance, will run through November 21

Chicago-based artist Theaster Gates launched Sanctum, a 24-day performance in Bristol, England that will have continuous programming 24 hours a day. Gates set the performance in Temple Church, a 14th-century building that was bombed out during the Bristol Blitz in World War II. The temporary venue was constructed out of leftover building materials from all over the city: brick and doors from local homes, bricks from the demolished citadel in St. Paul’s, wood from the Prince Street bridge, and flooring from a former chocolate factory nearby. Produced by the art organization Situations, the performance line up will not be published so visitors will not know what they will hear until they enter the space. Sanctum will be open through November 21.
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Theaster Gates opens Stony Island Arts Bank at Chicago Architecture Biennial

If you're in town for the Chicago Architecture Biennial, be sure to visit the newly-opened Stony Island Arts Bank, a formerly derelict 1923 bank structure on Chicago's South Side that has been transformed into a spectacular center for exhibitions, artist residencies, and the preservation of archival collections of black culture. The building's rebirth was made possible by artist Theaster Gates' Rebuild Foundation, which has renovated three other buildings in the area as part of its program of "culturally driven redevelopment." The Arts Bank's opening, said Gates, offers the Biennial "a way of understanding that great things can happen anywhere if we make the investment." In this case Gates (who bought the building from the city for $1 and then raised hundreds of thousands for its renovation) worked with his team of architects, bringing out the character of each room organically. Some parts were restored, others left as-is, and others made new. "If you're patient with the program, the building has so much to offer," said Gates. The heart of that program, outside of amazing rooms for artists and scholars, is the storage and display of the extensive archives of the Johnson Publishing Company, which printed black lifestyle magazines like Ebony and Jet. That collection is housed in a cavernous 2nd floor library whose books seem to reach to the sky. In other rooms and hallways you can see the Frankie Knuckles collection of the "godfather of black house music: and the Edward J. Williams Collection of more than 60,000 glass lantern slides. On display in the first floor gallery is an appropriately makeshift (and beautiful)  installation by Portuguese artist Carlos Bunga. Other Rebuild Foundation buildings include Black Cinema House (also home to Gates' studio), the Dorchester Art + Housing Collaborative, and Dorchester Projects.
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Wines, Gang, Sorkin Among Honorees at 2013 National Design Awards

When an artist begins,      they try to bury him with neglect. When he gains a small foothold,      they try to bury him with criticism. When he becomes more established,      they try to bury him with covetous disdain. When he becomes exceptionally successful,      they try to bury him with dismissals as irrelevant. And finally, all else failing      they try to bury him with honors! This is how James Wines of SITE, quoting Jean Cocteau, accepted his 2013 Lifetime Achievement Award from the Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum at their National Design Awards. Wines joined a 'Lifetime Achievement' group that includes Richard Saul Wurman, Bill Moggridge, Paolo Solari, the Vignelli's, Dan Kiley, and Frank Gehry. Last night's awards program was a special one as the Museum—led by its new director, Caroline Baumann, and an indefatigable team—worked throughout the government shutdown of the least two weeks to put on a spatular gala that gave awards to designers that included Janette Sadik-Khan, Michael Sorkin, Studio Gang Architects, Paula Scher, Aidlin Darling Design, and Margie Ruddick. These figures each asked a special commentator to introduce them. Theaster Gates presented Jeanne Gang from Chicago and Michael Kimmelman said that Michael Sorkin was the first person he spoke to when he decided to be the New York Times architecture critic. Sorkin accepted his award for "Design Mind" with a powerful tribute—as only he can—to his late friends and intellectual mentors, Lebbeus Woods and Marshall Berman. Al Gore presented the TED Talks with an award and finally it was left to Tom Wolfe to introduce James Wines, who he said had created the "first really new architecture after modernism" in his famous Best Stores which "added nothing to the architecture" only re-arranged what was already" as in his Best 'Notch' project in suburban Sacramento, California. Wolfe claimed that Wines wanted to replace "plop art" like formal plaza sculptures by Henry Moore and Isamu Noguchi with a new form that put the art onto the architecture. Its about time that Sorkin, who is our greatest living architecture critic to not have been awarded a Pulitzer Prize, and Wines, who is not a registered architect, to be given an award as a great architect.