Posts tagged with "The Broad":

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The Broad-adjacent Otium opens with Damien Hirst on the menu

Otium, the restaurant tucked in The Broad’s Barouni olive-treed, 24,000-square-foot public plaza, quietly opened last week in Downtown Los Angeles. The sum of chef Otium Timothy Hollingsworth and restaurateur Bill Chait, a lot is riding on the eatery to enliven Grand Avenue and the Diller Scofidio + Renfro / Walter Hood pocket park. Designed by Studio UNTLD and House of Honey with building architect Osvaldo Maiozzi, Otium is a boxy, steel-and-wood-clad structure that owes more architecturally to midcentury mods like Craig Ellwood or Ray Kappe than to DS+R’s museum. The traditional California burring inside and outside drive the glazed walls and expansive patio seating. Farm-to-table ethos clearly is behind vertical gardens from Green City Farms on the restaurant’s rooftop that are ready to provide the chef with herbs, vegetables and edible flowers. Inside the box is a large dining room and open kitchen. Windows look west over Hope Street, a view rarely emphasized up on Bunker Hill. According to the press release, the designers were tasked to compliment Hollingsworth with “sophisticated rusticity,” a phrase that looks good on paper, but jams in the mouth creating a lisp-like noise that is neither. A bounty of natural materials are plentiful: steel, glass, wood, copper, stone, nubby textiles, and ceramics. Or, as the PR explains: “The design is an artful mix of old and new, honest, and refined, that echoes the menu’s offerings.” To link the restaurant to the museum, there’s an exterior mural in the works by artist Damien Hirst. Installed on the south facade and entitled Isolated Elements, 2015, it is an approximately 32-foot high by 84-foot long large-scale photograph based on his 1991 sculpture Isolated Elements Swimming in the Same Direction for the Purpose of Understanding, aka the shark in a tank of formaldehyde. It’s unclear if carnivorous seafood is on the menu.
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Eavesdrop> Grrrl Power: Los Angeles has a ways to go for women’s equality in architecture

We live in a listicle age. Why write an article when you can clump a few names together and call it a trend? So when Los Angeles Magazine listed six women who have changed the face of Los Angeles architecture, which included one dead AIA Gold Medalist and two New Yorkers, it was bound to create outcry. Brava to the three local gals who made the cut, but let’s celebrate all the women of the L.A. architecture and design scene. When local schools put one lady on the lecture series and pat themselves on the back, we know more needs to be done for gender equity.
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Behind the Veil: The Broad opens September 20

When The Broad opens to the public on September 20, Angelenos will finally get to see how Diller Scofidio + Renfro’s design compliments philanthropists Eli and Edythe Broad’s powerhouse collection of 2,000 pieces of contemporary art in their eponymous museum. Works by Ed Ruscha and Cindy Sherman will hang in the 35,000-square-foot, column-free gallery space lit by some 300 skylights. Expectations are high for the $140 million dollar building, but from what we’ve seen and heard, the architecture is refined and detail-oriented. Or, as DS+R architect Kevin Rice said of Eli Broad, “I’ve never worked with another billionaire so interested in bathroom fixtures.” While the opening of a new building is always a thrill, AN has been tracking this feat of design, engineering, and curatorial might almost since its inception and we thought we’d share some of the highlights along the way. Screen Shot 2015-09-15 at 3.06.06 PM Q+A> KEVIN RICE Architectural journalist Sam Lubell spoke with DS+R's Kevin Rice and got a behind-the-scenes preview of the museum. He asked Rice about design goals for the adjacent public space. “The last thing we wanted was another dead corporate plaza that gets filled at lunchtime and has tumbleweeds flying around the rest of the time,” said Rice. “We wanted something that people would want to come back to throughout the day.” director talks Q+A> BROAD ART FOUNDATION DIRECTOR TALKS ARCHITECTURE, OPENING DATE FOR DS+R’S LOS ANGELES MUSEUM Late last year, AN talked with Broad Art Foundation Director Joanne Heyler to learn how the arts community was reacting to the new architecture. “The building is very sculptural because the Vault form [which contains the museum’s collection] creates the heart of the building,” said Heyler. “I’ve taken artists to see the collection inside and gotten an incredibly enthusiastic response.” rendering COMMENT: ARCHITECTURE IS NOT ENOUGH AT GRAND AVENUE “No amount of architecture will transform Bunker Hill,” said architecture critic and curator Greg Goldin in his comment that drew attention to the lackluster urban condition along Grand Avenue. While Eli Broad has an ambition to make the street into a boulevard, Goldin questions redevelopment efforts going back decades that have wiped out topography and displaced population. “Broad’s obsession with having architects strut their stuff has obscured the need for a considered response to the city itself—with varied program and a welcoming streetscape—not one street-top civic center,” he wrote. rem HERE’S REM KOOLHAAS’ “FLOATING” RUNNER-UP PROPOSAL FOR LOS ANGELES’ BROAD MUSEUM Lastly, why not show OMA’s similar, but not winning proposal? Rem Koolhaas’s firm proposed a “floating” box covered in a lacy-patterned metal screen and cantilevered via steel brace frames above Grand Avenue.
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Yayoi Kusama’s infinitely immersive installation opens with The Broad in Los Angeles

The long awaited opening of The Broad designed by Diller Scofidio + Renfro, in collaboration with Gensler, is scheduled for September 20 in Downtown Los Angeles. In anticipation of the big day, the museum released details about the inaugural installation that will fill the 35,000 square feet of column-free gallery space on the third floor. https://youtu.be/glR3YgJa7_4 [Video: Another of Yayoi Kusama's installations in the Infinity Mirrored Room series.] Curated by founding director Joanne Heyler, the rather chronological show will feature artworks by the heavy-hitters of the twentieth century drawn from the postwar and contemporary art collection assembled by philanthropists Eli and Edythe Broad: Jasper Johns, Robert Rauschenberg, Ed Ruscha, Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein, John Baldessari, Mark Bradford, Jeff Koons, Barbara Kruger and Kara Walker. For fans of immersive experiences, the first floor will feature one of the Broad’s newest acquisitions, Yayoi Kusama’s Infinity Mirrored Room – The Souls of Millions of Light Years Away. The mesmerizing, cosmic chamber filled with an uncountable number of LED lights drew crowds around the block when it was exhibited David Zwirner Gallery in late 2013. Other recent works comment on the issues and crises facing contemporary culture and the built environment. Takashi Murakami’s 82-foot-long painting—a reflection on Japan’s recovery from the catastrophic 2011 Tohoku earthquake and tsunami. Robert Longo’s 2014 charcoal drawing Untitled (Ferguson Police, August 13, 2014), depicts police protests in Ferguson, while Cairo (2013) by Julie Mehretu captures the atmosphere and social unrest the Arab Spring in a large-scale, architectural, ink-and-acrylic drawing.
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Scaffolding comes down at Los Angeles’ Broad Museum, but the first impressions are mixed

Rarely has the removal of a building's scaffolding caused as much hubbub as when Diller Scofidio + Renfro's The Broad in Downtown Los Angeles removed its temporary covering on December 31, revealing its "Veil," composed of 2,500 fiberglass-reinforced concrete panels. Those panels, you may remember, are the subject of an ongoing lawsuit against fabricator Seele. Unfortunately for the museum, which will open this fall, much of the media reaction (admittedly not the best indicator of public opinion) has been lukewarm. The Los Angeles Times likened the veil to a cheese grater and called responses to it "less than ecstatic;" Curbed LA announced that the museum had revealed its "newly disappointing facade," emphasizing how much clunkier it looked than the elegant renderings; and LAist compared its indented "Oculus" to the "Eye of Sauron" from Lord of the Rings. Of course, minds could easily change once the museum is running and full of art (and people). Stay tuned. This thing has to open eventually, right? And so you get to see more than the flat, frontal view, here are some new angles, below.      
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Q+A> Broad Art Foundation Director talks architecture, opening date for DS+R’s Los Angeles museum

After speculation, delay, and even a blockbuster lawsuit, the $140 million Broad Museum finally announced last week that it will be opening its doors in Fall 2015, about a year behind schedule. Designed by Diller Scofidio + Renfro, the Downtown Los Angeles museum will contain more than 2,000 works of contemporary art—part of the Broad Art Foundation's growing collection—and admission will be free to the public. AN West Editor Sam Lubell talked with Broad Art Foundation Director Joanne Heyler to get the latest on the project. And to get you keyed up for the eventual opening, here are some of the latest construction images. It's getting close! Sam Lubell: So what's left to do at The Broad? Joanne Heyler:  Everything that’s happening in the building is even better than I anticipated from the renderings and plans. The cylindrical glass elevator leading from the lobby to the third floor galleries is in and can operate, and its floor is lit up. To go from the first floor up to the top is really spine-tingling.  The relief portions of the Veil (aka the lattice-like facade), wrapping around the Hope street side of the museum, are in and successful. The porous parts of the Veil, where scaffolding is still wrapped around, are going to become the image for the public. They're still covered, but the scaffolding is coming down from the insides of the Veil. So on the third floor you can now stand in that expansive space and look towards Grand Avenue. Through the glass panels that are at the perimeter of that space you can see the inside surface of the veil exposed and that’s very exciting. The building is very sculptural because of the Vault form (the Vault will contain the museum's collection) creates the heart of the building, and that sculptural form is in place. Because of that it’s getting very close to complete and it’s very exciting. I’ve taken artists in the collection inside and gotten and incredibly enthusiastic response. The (24,000 square foot) plaza is very very close to being partially opened. It’s meant to open in November. The oculus or dimple or fold that’s in the Grand Avenue portion of the Veil is coming together and there's quite a view from inside. Really we’re making enormous strides. Because the building is so sculptural and dramatic it’s a more exciting hardhat tour than the usual. What were the project's biggest holdups?  The fabrication and installation of the Veil took far longer than was anticipated. However we’re at a stage now where we feel confident enough to at least name the season in which we’ll open, so we’re feeling pretty good about the progress that's being made. We had a difficult time. But we’re on track now. Has the lawsuit with Seele (the facade engineer) been settled?  It’s not settled, but I can’t comment on the lawsuit. Is there now a new engineer working on the Veil? No there’s no new engineer. Seele was taking care of that, and still is. Besides the Veil losing its structural capabilities, have there been any major changes since the project started? This building really has and is going to be completed very much the way that architects intended. I’ve seen other buildings go through many more twists and turns than this one has. Since the Veil issue there haven’t been any other major changes. Early on the elevator was added, but that was decided on a very long time ago. The other decision taken was to to expand the first floor public gallery space, but that decision was made early on as well. Do you believe the museum, and its plaza, will finally help enliven Grand Avenue?  I think that it will. Our plaza offers a rare green space for the area. The olive trees that have gone in are 100-year-old trees curated one-by-one by the design team, and I am very proud of how atmospheric the plaza is as a result. It's even better than I expected. I think it will be a very welcoming place for people. When the restaurant goes in there will be much more activity. I think we will play a big role in enlivening this stretch of Grand Avenue. It's not yet full of day-to-day pedestrian activity, but I think those days are numbered. Given what’s happening at Grand Park (For instance Jay Z's Made in America fest drew 35,000 people there) and as it becomes more residential that’s bound to become a factor in every part of downtown. We and the other institutions and Grand Park are increasing the number of reasons to come to Grand Avenue, not just for performances, but to linger and to get a meal. When the Grand Avenue Project moves ahead that will change it even more. The museum will be free of charge?  The museum is fully funded by the Broad Foundation. Eli has always talked about having a populist approach to art museums and to making it possible for people to connect to contemporary art. When we looked at what made sense to us we felt free admission was the way to go so people could take in the collection in one visit or in several. To have that kind of relationship with the museum. That’s what we hope to foster. We’ll also have a robust scope of engagement programming such as artist talks and film screenings. We’ve already had audiences of up to 2,000 for those. That kind of response is very exciting and we hope a signal of things to come. What's the biggest challenge moving ahead?  I don’t really anticipate any more major architectural challenges. We’re too far down the road. Operationally we’re interested in putting together programming and visitor amentities that make as much use of digital technology as possible. We’re looking to see what form that will take in the museum. There will be more information. The emphasis will be on the building and on the exhibitions. How will you be programming the museum?  The inaugural exhibition is very much in place. But the rest is very hard to pin down because we continue to add works week by week. Will the Broad Foundation maintain a presence in Santa Monica, its current home?  The building’s always been intended as the headquarters and home of the Broad Art foundation. That means we’ll be leaving Santa Monica. We’re all thrilled to be located downtown. When we launched this project downtown was buzzing, but it wasn’t what it is today. The whole array of residential units and restaurants and retail starting to percolate in interesting ways downtown—it’s just an incredibly dynamic time to be there. Does Eli have other architectural plans in the works?  We’re pretty pre-occupied with this building. But you never know with Eli.
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Broad Collection Sues Seele over Problematic Los Angeles Museum Facade

In a recent interview, Diller Scofidio + Renfro Senior Associate Kevin Rice told AN that the "veil" at Los Angeles' Broad Museum—a facade made of hundreds of molded Glass Fiber Reinforced Concrete (GFRC) panels, had been delayed by over a year. "Some of the things took longer to make than they thought, but there aren’t really problems with it," Rice said. But now it looks like the issues with the museum's facade are more severe than initially thought. The LA Times has reported that the Broad Collection and contractor Matt Construction are suing Seele, the engineer of that facade, seeking $19.8 million in damages relating to the delay. Other damages, according to the complaint (PDF), include breach of contract, fraud in the inducement, and fraud and deceit. The lawsuit, filed in Los Angeles Superior Court, alleges that Seele "violated the important 'aesthetic aspect' of the architect's design," and its mockups were "unsightly and wholly unacceptable for use on the project." As a result the firm was not able to meet its October, 2013 deadline to design, fabricate, and install the facade, setting the project's timeline way back. The Broad's lawsuit also names Zurich American Insurance Company and Fidelity and Deposit Company—backers of a bond guaranteeing Seele's work—as defendants. "Seele did not possess the necessary skill, experience, resources, commitment or ability to perform the work at The Broad museum," the complaint stated. Broad Foundation spokesperson Karen Denne told AN, "we're not commenting—the lawsuit speaks for itself." As of now the museum is still set to open in 2015, but the exact date remains up in the air.
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Here’s Rem Koolhaas’ “Floating” Runner-Up Proposal for Los Angeles’ Broad Museum

With Eli Broad hyping his DSR-designed Broad Museum in Downtown Los Angeles, we thought it would be appropriate to share The Broad that never was: OMA's runner up proposal. As featured in this author's book, Never Built Los Angeles, Rem Koolhaas's firm proposed a "floating" box covered in a lacy-patterned metal screen and cantilevered via steel brace frames above Grand Avenue. Lifting the structure would have created much needed civic space in the area, offering a public zone under the museum and complementing two new plazas to the south and the west of the building. Escalators would have travelled diagonally up from street level to the ethereal upper gallery floors, which would have been lit by multiple skylights. There's a lot to like here, and still some questions about the lack of public commentary before the winning scheme was chosen. Check out many more renderings of the scheme below.
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The Quotable Eli Broad Weighs in on Los Angeles

Diller Scofidio + Renfro's concrete-veiled Los Angeles art museum and its accompanying plaza, The Broad, named for the billionaire philanthropist Eli Broad who commissioned it,  continue to rise in downtown. Meanwhile, across the street, Broad's longtime project, MOCA, struggles to find its footing. Addressing these two projects, Broad sat down with Los Angeles Magazine, giving an unusually candid interview about the state of the city, his own giving, and much more. Here are some of his most revealing quotes from a man who, this time, departed from his usual tactic of sticking to talking points. "Right now Los Angeles needs a lot of things. It needs better political leadership and better citizen and corporate leadership than it’s had." "I don’t mean to brag, but in Los Angeles I don’t see anyone who has stepped forward to do the number of things that I’ve done." "With regards to Disney Hall, Frank Gehry had a contract as a design architect. He wasn’t supposed to get involved in construction. When I got involved, I had some ideas that Frank didn’t like. But we’re great friends now." "We took a chance on Jeffrey Deitch [at MOCA]. He’s a populist. He did several great shows, like Art in the Streets. He created MOCAtv. But he didn’t have the stomach, frankly, to deal with trustees or raise money or do other things. He was not a manager." "We had a lot of old trustees on the board (at MOCA) who give nothing and create a lot of problems. Four or five of the old trustees didn’t give anything to this campaign for the endowment, but they have no problem talking to the press and complaining. "We (Broad and his wife Edye) want to finish all our work within ten years after our demise. We don’t believe in having a foundation that’s around 50 years from now that has no idea of what the founders wanted done." "Oh, yeah. We’re accelerating our investment."
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Construction Heating Up in Downtown Los Angeles: DS+R and Arquitectonica To Hit Benchmarks

Next Tuesday, January 8, The Broad in Downtown Los Angeles (not that Broad Museum), Eli Broad's new contemporary art museum with an arresting net-like "veil" facade by Diller Scofidio + Renfro, will top out at the corner of Grand Avenue and Second Street. The project is set to open next year and will contain 120,000-square-feet over three-levels, including 50,000 square feet of gallery space on two floors, a lecture hall for up to 200 people, a public lobby with display space and a museum shop. As usual, the topping-out ceremony will include a theatrical event: in this case, the "flying of the beam," in which a 294-foot crane lifts the final steel beam to the top of the structure. (In the meantime, take a fly-through of the new building in this video rendering.) In addition to Broad and DS+R, others on hand will be LA Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa as well as 100 construction workers for the project. You can watch a live construction cam of the project here. AN also learned that Related California will break ground on its new Arquitectonica-designed apartment tower on January 10, just two days after the Broad event. The 19-story building is the first major piece of the long-delayed Grand Avenue project. No more details on the event, but there are sure to be some fancy shovels and some bigwigs on hand. That's some heavy symbolism for the transformation of downtown's long-troubled Grand Avenue. Yes, it's really happening.
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See CRA Sprint

We learn from our friends at Curbed LA that LA's CRA (Community Redevelopment Agency) is scrambling to put away funds for about a billion dollars in projects before being potentially done away with later this year. You see, earlier this month California Governor Jerry Brown proposed— among $12.5 billion in budget cuts— “phasing out” funding for all of the state’s redevelopment agencies, a move that, according to Brown, “will return billions in property tax revenues to schools, cities and counties and help pay for public safety, education and other services.” According to Curbed, the CRA just "quickly put together a draft agreement with the city that socks away $938 million for future projects." That includes money for The Broad's new parking garage, for a new office tower on Vine Street in Hollywood. No matter what you think of redevelopment agencies, the move will hurt architects and builders. So stay tuned next week for AN's comprehensive article on just how much it will hurt. Sounds fun, right?
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Comment: Architecture Is Not Enough at Grand Avenue

When Diller Scofidio + Renfro were solicited last June by Eli Broad to sketch an idea for his new archive and museum, the architects were forced to ask:  “What do you build next to Disney Hall?” Answer:  Something else.  Where Frank Gehry’s work is smooth and impenetrable, the Broad Art Foundation is porous and accessible.  The stainless steel concert hall reflects the city’s skyline; blinding sunlight bounces off its capering shell.  The Broad’s concrete veil, by contrast, is a less aggressive spectacle. At three-feet thick, and punched through with large angular openings, the new museum looks as if it is cloaked in an ice cube tray twisted by a powerful algorithm.  As, certainly, it has been, to pleasing effect. Over time the animated, if a bit too-tidy white box, with its dramatic, carved out entryway – a quote of Diller’s earlier Alice Tully Hall – will settle onto Grand Avenue, a signature building poised not so much to duke it out with Disney as to hold firmly its own ground.  The trouble here is that everyone – architects, planners, civic officials, and developers – is convinced that if you plant the right number of monuments on Grand Avenue, the street will become, as Eli Broad says, “the Champs Elysees of Los Angeles.”  What they’re looking for is a sidewalk lined by masterpieces. No amount of architecture will transform Bunker Hill – the nation’s longest-running redevelopment project (some would say scam). Broad’s obsession with having architects strut their stuff has obscured the need for a considered response to the city itself— with varied program and a welcoming streetscape—not one street-top civic center.  This is not to argue for provincial architecture.  But it might be helpful if what goes up on Grand Avenue were considered in its rightful place and not as some moon-shot projectile intended to rescue or restore or resuscitate a barren landscape.  For starters, the hill itself is – as it has been elsewhere – trampled, converted into a 3-story garage, as if the slope were actually flat.  Why have the architects decided to essentially level a site that drops 200 feet from front to back?  An inner truth – not to mention a particular history of human occupancy – resides in this steep hillside, yet the topography is buried.  Does this geography communicate no ideas that might be captured in a building and, ultimately, speak to the city at large?  And if Los Angeles is truly the center of contemporary art – as Broad and others argued at the unveiling of the museum’s design – why doesn’t the new building reach for a language that breathes the gritty, somewhat toxic perfume that spurs art here. As it is conceived, the Broad is a pleasant museum, with an admirable lobby, an exciting gallery space, and an eye-catching skin, suited to any philanthropist with $130 million to spare.   As usual, Los Angeles gets the architecture of anywhere, leaving us to wonder where our city really is and who has the guts to confront it.