Posts tagged with "SPF:A":

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Construction starts on a 605-foot-long pedestrian bridge designed by Studio Pali Fekete

Dubbed Riptide, the 6-span, 605-foot-long pedestrian bridge by Studio Pali Fekete architects (SPF:a) will move the heart of downtown Long Beach. Located at the southern edge of the Los Angeles, Long Beach is home to an important regional, late modernist civic center as well as the Port of Long Beach, an economic powerhouse for the region. The downtown area, the nucleus of an independent municipality, features a smattering of smattering of mid-rise office towers housing municipal functions along Ocean Avenue and Shoreline Drive. Buildings on these roads are connected by a network of pedestrianized bridges; SPF:a’s bridge aims to close a missing link in that system by connecting the Performing Arts Center Plaza with the Convention Center Promenade to the south. The designers drew inspiration from the city’s seaside locale and mercantile traditions, abstracting the geometry of an ocean wave into a series of metallic sections connected via crisscrossing lengths of metal rope and strings of LED lights. The breaking wave shape is pulled across the length of the span above a paved boardwalk populated with seating. In some sections, the boardwalk is planted along its western edge, with trees piercing the wave armature in one location. The bridge, conceived more as a potential node for conversation and commerce emanating from the nearby convention center, will also feature electrical outlets. New construction on the $9.3 million bridge will be accompanied by the replacement of damaged curbs, gutters, driveways, alley entrances, and sidewalks in the area. The project is due for completion in February of 2017.
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SPF:a employs prefab construction to expand Rancho Cienega Sports Complex in Los Angeles

After winning a Los Angeles–sponsored competition last February to redevelop the Rancho Cienega Sports Complex (RCSC) in Baldwin Hills, SPF:a—along with landscape architect Hood Design Studio and engineer Buro Happold—is moving forward with design. The firm found out through their research that the community needed more space than the original competition program foresaw. So they developed a prefabricated building system (combining minimal, integrated, pre-engineered components with limited bespoke ones) that minimizes budget, allowing them to increase area. For instance they saved enough to enlarge a 13,000 square foot pool facility to 23,000 square feet and an 11,000 square foot basketball area to 16,000 square feet. The project also offers exceptional environmental perks, like the transformation of the facility's old pool into a rainwater storage tank, geothermal heating, extensive daylighting through solar tubes, natural ventilation and a photovoltaic rooftop. It is aiming for a LEED Silver rating. Another goal was “coherent image reflection,” said SPF:a cofounder Zoltan Pali. For instance, building components mirror the design and color of basketball backboards, field goal structures and scoreboards. SPF:a collaborated with Hood Design Studio to create an extensive outdoor greening concept. Their landscape strategy clarifies circulation and creates additional gathering areas between the existing sports fields. Drought tolerant planting creates a "botanical garden," featuring five distinct ecologies: high desert, canyon, coastal, chaparral and medicinal. Designed for a multi-staged construction process that will allow all facilities to remain open during redevelopment. Construction is expected to commence in mid 2016 with the new facilities opening in phases through 2018. LA City Council President Herb Wesson, who has led the city's investment in the project, considers the complex to be “a tremendous community asset, both as a great neighborhood park, and also as a great Regional Park serving residents from all over the city.” He added: "We look forward to realizing a more modern park space so that the families in our community can enjoy a safer and healthier recreational experience.”
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Eavesdrop> Is Zoltan Pali Out at the Academy Museum?

[beforeafter]02b-academy-museum-losangeles-renzo-piano-archpaper 02a-academy-museum-losangeles-renzo-piano-archpaper[/beforeafter]   In sad but spectacular gossip news, we’ve been informed that Culver City firm SPF:a has been removed from the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences' new museum project in Los Angeles. SPF:a principal Zoltan Pali had been working with Renzo Piano on the project since 2012. The design for what is now called the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures includes a renovation of AC Martin’s Streamline Moderne May Company Building (1939) on Wilshire and Fairfax avenues and a new 140-foot-diameter glass and steel globe sited behind the existing building, which would contain, among other things, a 1,000-seat theater. The Academy has declined to comment on the matter, and AN has so far been unable to reach SPF:a. After first receiving the commission, Pali told AN, “It is a full collaboration in every aspect. We work together very well.  I love working with Renzo.”
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Eavesdrop> LA’s Academy Museum Shortlist Revealed

We learned in October that LA's Academy of Motion Picture Sciences would be building its new museum inside the former May Company building on Miracle Mile, right next to LACMA. Now we hear that the project may soon be getting an architect. Our rumor mill has produced three shortlisted names: Morphosis, wHY Architecture, and spf:A. The last on the list, spf:A, had developed LACMA's plan for the building back when it was still going to contain the museum's art galleries. So is this a chance for them to salvage that job? Meanwhile Morphosis gets a chance to try again on a major LA museum after losing the Broad Museum commission once the project moved from Beverly Hills to downtown. We’re sure wHY has a shot at some kind of redemption as well, we just don’t know what it is.
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LACMA Puts Kibosh On New Building

We've just learned via the LA Times that construction-happy LACMA has suspended all future projects until they've raised another $100 million. The news comes on the heels of a mixed finance review from Moody's Investors Service, which downgraded its ratings outlook from "stable" to "negative." The museum has so far raised about $320 million for its construction program, and its construction bonds kept their A2 rating. The suspension means an official halt to SPF:A Architects' LACMA West Project, which includes the renovation of the 1939 May Company building on Wilshire and Fairfax into new gallery spaces. That project was originally scheduled for completion this year. It also puts a longer hold on renovation projects on LACMA's east end, which were to be the third phase of LACMA's campus transformation.