Posts tagged with "South Street Seaport Museum":

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15 great events to attend during the AIA Conference in New York City

The AIA Conference on Architecture is just around the corner, from June 21 to 23 at the Javits Center in New York City. To add to the excitement, the city will be bustling with architecture events and exhibits, including at MoMA PS1, the Storefront for Art and Architecture, and the Van Alen Institute. Here are our editors' highlights for the week. 1) MoMA PS1 
Young Architects Program Museum of Modern Art 11 West 53rd St. (Midtown) June 18 6:00–8:00 pm. Free. RSVPs required* www.momaps1.org Exhibition reception for 2018 Young Architects Program, featuring finalists LeCAVALIER R+D, FreelandBuck, BairBalliet, and OFICINAA. The winning scheme Hide & Seek by Dream The Combine (Jennifer Newsom and Tom Carruthers), opens to the public June 26. Opening reception, limited space. 2) Night at the Museums Various locations June 19 4:00–8:00 pm. Free. NightattheMuseums.org Fourteen Lower Manhattan museums open their
 doors, free of charge, as part of this annual event. Visit the Skyscraper Museum, African Burial Ground, Museum of Jewish Heritage, South Street Seaport Museum, National 9/11 Memorial, and others. 3) Architecture Books Opening Reception Storefront for Art and Architecture 97 Kenmare St. (SoHo) June 19 7:00–9:00 pm. Free. Storefrontnews.org Now on display at the legendary Steven Holl and Vito Acconci–designed gallery, selection of 100 fundamental books, selected by a jury, based on Storefront’s Global Survey of Architecture Books. On June 26, Storefront will host a conference at the New York Public Library Main Branch (6:30–8:30 pm, free), featuring prominent architects. 4) Solstice: 24x24x24 Storefront for Art and Architecture 97 Kenmare St. (SoHo) June 20–June 21 Storefrontnews.org Making the most of the longest day of the year, 24x24x24 brings together 24 designers to shape a day of programming and contribute a seat for a collective gathering during the summer solstice. From dawn until dusk, 24x24x24 is an experiment in collective production in design, action, and thinking. 24x24x24 is collectively organized and curated by a group of architects who will be taking over Storefront for Art and Architecture from 7pm on June 20 to 7pm on June 21. 5) Mind the Gap: Improving Urban Mobility Through Science and Design Van Alen Institute 30 West 22nd St. (Flatiron) June 20 6:30–8:30 pm. Free. VanAlen.org An examination of how populations move through cities, using tools and methods from neuroscience and behavioral psychology. Organized by the Van Alen Institute. AN’s very own Assistant Editor Jonathan Hilburg will moderate the discussion. 6) Summer Solstice Aperitivo
 Vitra 100 Gansevoort St. (Meatpacking District) June 21 4:00-8:00 pm. Free with RSVP* aiany.org Toast the summer solstice with Vitra and Skyline Design. Aperitivi, live DJ, and special exhibitions. 7) Architecture League Prize 2018: Night 1 Sheila C. Johnson
 Design Center Parsons School of Design 66 Fifth Ave. (Greenwich Village) June 21 7:00–9:00 pm. $10 for non-members. RSVP required* ArchLeague.org Lectures by the winners of the Architectural League’s prestigious annual prize, recognizing the nation’s top young architects: Gabriel Cueller & Athar Mufreh, Coryn Kempster, and Bryony Roberts. Followed by reception 8) Modulightor Building Open House 246 East 58th St. (Midtown) June 22 6:00–9:00 pm. $15. RSVP required* modulightor.com Tour Paul Rudolph’s stunning four-story glass townhouse.
9) Infrastructure: The Architecture Lobby National Think-In Javits Center 655 W 34th St, New York June 22 7:00 am–7:00 pm Prime Produce 424 W 54th St (between 9th and 10th aves) June 23 10:00 am – 7:00pm This Think-In is divided into two parts over two days: active engagement with relevant sessions at the AIA National convention to ensure substantive dialogues on professional issues on Friday, June 22; and Think-In panel discussions on Saturday, June 23 at Prime Produce that examine the theme of Infrastructure. Infrastructure is the network of systems necessary for an organization to function. When those systems are degraded enough, the defining functions of the organization fail. The Architecture Lobby has selected this theme for its first National Think-In to generate a way forward and rebuild our discipline’s infrastructure. 10) Architecture League Prize 2018: Night 2 Sheila C. Johnson
 Design Center Parsons School of Design 66 Fifth Ave. (Greenwich Village) June 22 7:00–9:00 pm. $10 for non-members. RSVP required* ArchLeague.org Lectures by winners of the Architectural League’s prize: Anya Sirota, Alison Von Glinow & Lap Chi Kwong, and Dan Spiegel. 11) A’18 Community Service Day Various locations Check-in: Center for Architecture 536 LaGuardia Place 7:30 am–6:00 pm; reception 6:00–8:00 pm aiany.org/a18 Looking for a meaningful way to spend the last day of conference? AIANY encourages you to volunteer for a half or full day of work that will benefit local nonprofits. Roll
 up your sleeps and pitch in on projects that range from upgrading a church kitchen, fixing a shelter’s community room, working a mobile farmer’s market in an underserved community, and installing infrastructure at a school’s educational outdoor garden. Volunteers will have the chance to make a real difference for these organizations and the people they serve, and
 see parts of New York City that they might not otherwise visit. Collaborating firms include: Cannon Design and Stalco Construction, James Wagman Architect, Murphy Burnham & Buttrick Architects, FXCollaborative, Perkins Eastman, and 1100 Architect. Participants must sign up in advance. 12) Architectural League Prize for Young Architects + Designers
 Arnold and Sheila
 Aronson Galleries Parsons School of Design 66 Fifth Ave.
(Greenwich Village) June 22–23 12:00–6:00 pm. Free. ArchLeague.org Exhibition featuring the 2018 winners of this prestigious prize program. This year’s theme, Objective, asked entrants to consider objectivity and criteria by which architecture might be judged today. 13) Panorama of the City of New York
 Queens Museum Flushing Meadows Corona Park Ongoing QueensMuseum.org Conceived by urban mastermind and World’s Fair President Robert Moses for the 1964 Fair, the Panorama is a 1:1200 scale model of New York City, covering 469 acres and including hundreds of thousands individually crafted buildings. In 1992, the original modelmaker updated the Panorama while the museum underwent its expansion, designed by Rafael Viñoly. 14) New York at Its Core: 400 Years of NYC History Museum of the City
 of New York 1220 Fifth Ave.
(Upper East Side) Ongoing MCNY.org What made New York New York? Follow the story of the city’s rise from a striving Dutch village to today’s “Capital of the World.” Framed around themes of money, density, diversity, and creativity, the city delves into its past and invites visitors to propose visions for its future. 15) Designing Waste: Strategies for a Zero Waste City Center for Architecture 536 La Guardia Place (Greenwich village) Through September 1 CenterforArchitecture.org Waste is a design problem. This show presents strategies for architects, designers, and building professionals to help divert waste from landfills. Curator Andrew Blum will lead tours of the exhibition on Friday, June 22, 10:00–11:00 am, and Saturday, June 23, 11:00 am–12:00 pm. This exhibition is based on the Zero Waste Design Guidelines and supported by the Rockefeller Foundation. Text by AIA City Guide, Storefront for Art and Architecture and AN.
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Event>Re-Envisioning the South Street Seaport Museum

Wendy Evans Joseph and Chris Cooper Re-Envisioning the South Street Seaport Museum Thursday, May 10, 6:30 p.m. South Street Seaport Museum 12 Fulton St. southstreetseaportmuseum.org Following extensive renovation, the South Street Seaport Museum reopened its doors in January under the auspices of the Museum of the City of New York. With 16 galleries, a site-specific sculptural installation, and a new shop, the museum is now a modern and vibrant cultural center in the historic Schermerhorn Row. The architects behind this renovation, Wendy Evans Joseph and Chris Cooper of Cooper Joseph Studio, will discuss their approach in modernizing these historic structures and the process of realizing their vision. $6 tickets for readers of The Architect’s Newspaper! Reservations required. Enter discount code Arch2012 when registering online at boxoffice.mcny.org to receive discounted rate. For more information or to reserve by phone, please call 917-492-3395.
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Slideshow> Revamped Seaport Museum Opens: Old Salts Meet Occupy Wall St.

A revamped South Street Seaport Museum shook off the dust last night to reopen after a three-month renovation overseen by the Museum of the City of New York. The exhibits were both a departure from and an embrace of the old collection.  The design team, particularly Wendy Evans Joseph and Chris Cooper of Cooper Joseph Studio, turned what could have been a cramped exhibition arrangement into a free-flowing multi-leveled space. Some of the contemporary elements might strike a design-conscious audience as familiar. A very large segment of the exhibition space is devoted to contemporary furnishings designed and "Made in New York," feeling a bit like an ICFF satellite. A fashion component adds a dash of Fifth Avenue flair. MCNY's curator of architecture and design Donald Albrecht noted that the port was always about moving goods and "making." Much of the work assembled in the show is manufactured in Brooklyn warehouses that once serviced the maritime trade but have since been repurposed for an ever-expanding design industry. A few standouts were Daniel Michalik's recycled cork chaise lounge from 2006 and designer David Nosanchuk's multi-faceted Plexiglas lamp, the NR1.  Nosanchuk's piece represents a rarity these days in that it was both designed and manufactured in Manhattan.  With all the ship-making tools painstakingly arranged on angled white plane in the gallery next door, the "making" tradition becomes abundantly clear.  Less clear is whether the inclusion of contemporary fashion makes the same seamless leap. Still, fashion designer Jordon Betten's installation of a lost waif in a part of the museum building that originally housed the Sweet's Hotel (1870-1920) provides a stirring contrast to the decayed rafters. Some older exhibits from MCNY made the trip downtown, including Eric Sanderson's Manahatta, which includes a three dimensional map of Mahattan with an overhead projector that digitally morphs the terrain from natural wetlands and forests of 1650 to today's dense street grid. There's also a tight ensemble of Edward Burtynsky photographs. Burtynsky's images of Bangladeshi shipbreakers dismantling once powerful ships for scrap metal provide an unexpected smack of mortality. Another gallery calls attention to "The New Port" with a time-lapse video by digital artist Ben Rubin called Terminal 8 that focuses on of arrivals and departures of American Airlines jets at JFK. But as the gallery prominently features American Airlines corporate brand it's difficult to see the artistic forest through the commercial trees, a fact made all the more jarring by the Occupy Wall Street photo exhibition just two galleries away. The Occupy segment of the exhibit is perhaps the biggest stroke of marketing smarts on the part of MCNY that might just distract tourists from the ghoulish "Bodies" exhibit across the street and bring them back into a New York state of mind. The Occupy gallery was packed on opening night. It added a cool factor that can't be quantified.  The exhibit itself recalls the Here is New York show that opened in Soho about a month after the 9/11 attacks and later toured around the world. The photos celebrate, engage, and provoke, much like the demonstrations. Not a bad metaphor for the city at large or the new management.