Posts tagged with "Solatube":

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Product> Smart Thinking: Integrative Smart Building Products

Make both residential and commercial buildings energy and time efficient with these top-notch smart lighting, security, and all-in-one products. Piper NV Piper Keep an eye on your home or office at all times with the Piper NV, a versatile smart security system with 180 degree day-night vision, a two-way audio system, a HD panoramic camera, customizable alerts, and three security modes—home, away, and vacation. Piper NV comes in Raven Black or Polar White. DC-600E Integration Controller Mitsubishi Electric This multiuse controller allows the user to design, program, install, train, and follow-up on an integration process all with one device. With this controller, the user can manage heating, cooling, carbon monoxide, lighting, and water, all while saving energy and lowering costs. Daylight Dimmer Solatube New to the SkyVault Series, the switch-controlled, 29-inch-wide Daylight Dimmer distributes even amounts of natural light throughout commercial spaces. Outfitted with Solatube’s patented butterfly baffle, the dimmer reduces flares during both opening and closing. It’s compatible with any of the Solatube SkyVault products. Palladiom QS Lutron This wireless lighting and shading keypad is designed for hospitality environments. The keypad is equipped with adjustable and customizable backlit engraved text that can be brightened or dimmed as needed. The keypad comes in both rectangular and square shapes, and it’s available in ten architectural matte plastic finishes, 11 architectural metals, and a white glass finish. OS 2.8 Control4 Managing home security, entertainment, lighting, and HVAC systems from your smart phone is easier than ever with the new and improved OS 2.8 for Control4 devices. The OS 2.8 allows users to lock and unlock doors, open and close gates and garage doors, stream music, and access project data via the new dealer tools. MATCH D1MP AND MATCH D2MP Luxul Manage light settings and monitor energy consumption with these two metered smart switches. MATCH D1MP works with LED driver dimmers with phase dimming, while MATCH D2MP is compatible with LED driver dimmers with 0-10V dimming. Both switches feature a 120V/240V power supply and are operated via tablet or smartphone.
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Gould Evans Rewraps Kansas Library

Terra cotta rain screen transforms brutalist eyesore into energy-efficient community space.

Considered an aesthetic and functional failure almost since its construction in 1974, the old public library in Lawrence, Kansas, was overdue for a renovation four decades later. Gould Evans' challenge was to transform the low-slung brutalist behemoth, a poor environmental performer lacking both adequate daylighting and a sense of connection to the community, into an asset. "The desire was to try to come up with a building that basically reinvented the library for the community," said vice president Sean Zaudke. Rather than tacking an addition on to one end of the existing structure, the architects elected to wrap a 20,000-square-foot reading room and open stacks area around the old facade. In so doing, they altered the exterior for the better, swapping bare concrete for an earth-hued terra cotta rain screen punctuated by plentiful glazing. They also significantly enhanced the library's environmental performance, with early estimates suggesting that the new Lawrence Public Library will see a 50 percent reduction in energy usage despite a 50 percent increase in square footage. The decision to entirely enclose the old building within the addition was a critical component of the architects' sustainability strategy. "It allowed us to come up with a continuous facade utilizing a continuous insulation system," explained Zaudke. "It helped a lot with energy performance." Gould Evans chose a terra cotta rain screen from NBK to better tie the library to its surroundings. The building is located in an interstitial zone, immediately adjacent to buildings constructed in the 1950s but not far from Lawrence's thriving historic downtown. "We selected terra cotta because it could play by both sets of rules," said Zaudke. "It has an historic connotation, but it's also a much more modern-looking material."
  • Facade Manufacturer NBK (terra cotta), EFCO Corporation (storefront/curtain wall), Insulite Glass Company (glazing)
  • Architects Gould Evans
  • Facade Installer Drewco Inc. (terra cotta), Kennedy Glass (storefront/curtain wall/glazing)
  • Facade Consultant Building Science Corporation
  • Location Lawrence, KS
  • Date of Completion 2014
  • System terra cotta rain screen, high performance glazing and Solatubes, tongue-in-groove wood siding over existing concrete
  • Products NBK TERRART-MID, EFCO S433 storefront, EFCO S5600 curtain wall, EFCO D318 doors, PPG Solarban 70XL glass
Daylighting was another of the architects' key concerns. "Because there were so few windows in the old library, wherever you went there was a sort of phototropic behavior," said Zaudke. "People just gathered around the windows. The rest was not as utilized." Gould Evans significantly altered the user experience by creating an open reading room within the wraparound addition, all of which is exposed to daylight. Other library functions are contained within the core, which in turn is lit both by a continuous clerestory and a series of Solatubes. The clerestory also prevents glare within the reading room by illuminating the inside of the facade. Gould Evans used prescriptive data to determine the overall balance of terra cotta to glass on the new facade—about 60/40—as well as on each exterior wall. To reduce thermal gain on the east and west faces, the architects placed terra cotta baguettes over each horizontal slit window. Together, the baguettes and the depth of the wall act as sunshades. As for Lawrence Public Library's old concrete facade, "we didn't want to just pretend it wasn't there," said Zaudke. Instead, Gould Evans partially overlaid it with a tongue-in-groove system of unstained wood. "The concrete had a harsh feel to it," explained Zaudke. "By wrapping it with wood and revealing it in places, there's this nice dialog that occurs. Everywhere it opens up is where some core function reveals itself—it's an interesting dynamic." At the library entrance, the architects brought the wood outside, encased in glass to protect it from the elements, said Zaudke. "That vocabulary of cracking open the library, of making it accessible, is present at the entry."