Posts tagged with "SHoP Architects":

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Facades+ is Fast Approaching! Sign Up Today for Exclusive Educational Opportunities

icons_blog-3 Facades+ PERFORMANCE is only ten days away! Space is filling up fast, so don’t miss your chance to be part of this groundbreaking, two-day convergence of the industry’s leading innovators. Register today to take advantage of our exclusive educational opportunities, including a day-long symposium examining new perspectives on building skins and sustainable practices, and hands-on technical workshops in the latest design and analysis technologies that are revolutionizing contemporary architecture. And don’t forget about our in-depth, seminar-style dialog workshops, in which leading professionals from across the AEC industry sit down with you to discuss their most innovative recent projects. Space is limited, and some sessions are already SOLD OUT, so sign up today to reserve you seat! Join the movement that is changing the face of the built environment, only at Facades+ PERFORMANCE – Chicago, Oct. 24-25th! The conference kicks off next Thursday morning with a keynote address from founding principal of Behnisch Architekten, Stefan Behnisch, as he discusses the evolving role of building enclosures amidst ever-advancing technologies. The symposium will continue throughout the day as representatives from SOM, Thornton Tomasetti, Rojkind Arquitectos, and other leading firms will discuss the most pressing issues in sustainable, high-performance facades. Registered architects can earn 8 AIA LU/HSW credits. The following day, attendees can customize their schedules to best suit their professional goals. Sign up for two, half-day dialog workshops to join representatives from SHoP Construction, Gehry Technologies, Morphosis, and other industry leaders for intimate discussions of exciting, real-world case studies. Or register for our cutting-edge technology workshops, and join the experts for full-day, project-based instruction in the most relevant applications of breakthrough technologies, like environmental analysis with Grasshopper and Ladybug, and parametric facade design with Dynnamo for Revit—another exciting opportunity to score your AIA credits! For a complete schedule of events, check out the full Facades+ PERFORMANCE site.
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Details of Park Design Around SHoP’s East River Twin Towers Revealed

As part of a larger vision a pair of skyscrapers in Manhattan's Murray Hill neighborhood, JDS Development Group plans to build a new park at 626 First Avenue. The park will be situated alongside two luxury rental towers designed by SHoP Architects. The towers are scheduled to open in early 2016. While privately owned, the tranquil green space will be available for the public to enjoy. It will incorporate ginkgo trees, crisscrossed granite, and limestone paths, bike parking, seating and a water fountain, according to details revealed by JDS. Renderings Courtesy JDS Development Group / SHoP Architects. 626-First-1 626-First-2 626-First-3 626-First-4 626-First-5 626-First-6 626-First-7 626-First-8
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Keeping Up With the Super-Tall Joneses: SHoP Designs Another Manhattan Skyscraper

Manhattan's 57th Street continues its ascent as New York City's new gold coast with a skinny skyscraper unveiled by SHoP Architects and JDS Development today. SHoP most recently celebrated the groundbreaking of another skyscraper for JDS along the East River, but has now been tapped to build a lean, luxury high-rise on West 57th Street that could climb to a whopping 1,350 feet tall. If built, the condo tower would stand 100 feet taller than the Empire State Building. The Wall Street Journal reported that while developers JDS Development and Property Markets Group will not comment on whether financing has been secured, they have already presented plans to the Landmarks Preservation Commission. Stepping back from the street as it rises, the quarter-mile-high skyscraper will emulate steps and be clad in bronze-and-white terra-cotta stripes. SHoP partner, Vishaan Chakrabarti, told the WSJ the materials would create an effect that "sparkles during the day and has a soft glow at night." The developers were able to add height to the building by purchasing air rights from other properties in the vicinity. Elsewhere on 57th Street, BIG is building a pyramidal "court-scraper," Raphael Viñoly has designed the 1,380-foot-tall 432 Park Tower, Christian de Portzamparc's One57 tower is nearing completion, Cetra Ruddy has designed an ultra-skinny 51 story tower, and SOM's Roger Duffy is planning a prismatic, 57-story tower. Chicago's skyscraper experts, Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill, have also been tapped to design a skyscraper near 57th and Broadway, but no design has been released. The developers said they hope to break ground by 2014.
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SHoP Project Engineer Sophie Pennetier at AN’s Facades+PERFORMANCE Chicago

AN’s distinctive Facades+PERFORMANCE conference in Chicago provides participants the exclusive opportunity to engage in in-depth dialogue with frontrunners in the architecture, fabrication, and engineering industries. On October 25th at the Illinois Institute of Technology, workshop leaders such as Sophie Pennetier, Project Engineer at SHoP, will lead intimate discussions conducive to innovation and creative problem-solving. Topics including bent glass, designing for wood fabrication in complex geometries, and integrating performance are on the lineup. Leading a discussion focused on new and existing methods for designing and using cold formed, heat molded, or otherwise double-curved glass, Pennetier, along with Beatriz Fernandez of Cricursa and Franklin Lancaster of Eckersley O’Callaghan, will present real-world case studies. A structural engineer with five years of experience in design, detailing, and construction in complex structures, she specializes in non-conventional structures and envelope systems. Before joining SHoP Construction this year where she has worked on modular construction projects, she worked as a structural engineer at Guy Nordenson and Associates (GNA) in New York, and prior to that as a structural engineer at RFR Consulting in Paris, where she contributed to groundbreaking UHPC curtain wall system development with the Liquid Wall project. As a member of the ASCE-AEI Curtain Wall Committee and the ASTM Committee E06 on Performance of Buildings, she contributes to the development of US structural glass standards. Pennetier has earned a Masters in Mechanics of Materials and Structures at Polytechnic School EPF in Paris and a Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering at Polytechnic School in Montreal.
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SHoP Architects’ Dancing Towers Break Ground on First Avenue in New York

After a decade-long wait, construction commenced in late July on a pair of conjoined rental towers designed by SHoP Architects on an empty parcel on First Avenue between 35th and 36th Streets. The New York Times reported that the two copper buildings, consisting of 800 units and reaching up to 49 and 40 stories, will be connected by a sky bridge. The luxury development will boast high-end amenities and facilities such as  indoor lap pool, rooftop deck with infinity pool, fitness center, squash court, and film screening room. These dancing towers will be a visual departure for this area around Turtle Bay, which is home to a cluster of hospitals and medical centers and bereft of much new contemporary architecture. Vishaan Chakrabarti, a partner at SHoP Architects, told the Times that the copper veiled facades were inspired from Richard Serra's twisted sheet metal sculptures. Also in the works is a privately-operated park and an elementary school if City Planning gives the developer JDS Development the green light. The construction site flooded during Hurricane Sandy, so now the two buildings are being prepped for future storms. JDS Development said they are planning on placing mechanicals above grade, and considering floodgates and backup generators.

JDS Development purchased the roughly one-acre parcel from developer Sheldon H. Solow who had originally tapped Richard Meier and Skidmore Owings & Merrill to design 7 towers on this sprawling 9.2-acre site.

The development is expected to be completed by early 2016.
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New York Restoration Project Jumpstarts Design Competition with Selection of Eight Local Firms

In the wake of Hurricane Sandy, architects have been called to arms to both engage in the immediate recovery efforts and to come up with design solutions that will make New York City's buildings more resilient and sustainable in the long-term. The latest in a flood of new Sandy-inspired design initiatives was launched yesterday by New York Restoration Project (NYRP), dubbed "EDGE/ucation Pavillion Design Competition," asking a group of hand-picked, up-and-coming architecture firms to create a storm-resistant pavilion in Sherman Creek Park right on the Harlem River. The structure, located on a former illegal garbage dumping site, would serve as a boating facility and outdoor classroom for a number of activities such as wetland exploration and oyster gardening. The NYRP undertook a major clean-up of the polluted 5-acre area in 1996 and has since transformed it into a healthy and verdant public space for recreation and boating. The project is expected to cost $900,000. With the help of Susanna Sirefman of Dovetail Design Strategists, the NYRP selected eight Manhattan and Brooklyn-based firms, that include: Bade Stageberg Cox, Desai/Chia Architecture, HOLLER Architecture, KNE Studio, Lang Architecture, Taylor and Miller Architecture + Design, Urban Data & Design, and WORKac. The firms will submit their proposals on September 16th, and the following month, a Technical Advisory Group made up of leaders in the field—such as Adrian Benepe, Director of City Park Development for Trust of a Public Land and Thomas Christoffersen of BIG—will select the five finalists. A new jury—including NYRP founder Bette Midler, James Polshek of Ennead Architects, and Christopher Sharples of SHoP Architects—will then look over the submissions. A winning proposal will be announced in late November 2013.
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SHoP and Ken Smith Unveil Another Piece of the East River Esplanade

Connecting two existing waterfronts—Battery Park and East River Park—the rehabilitation of the East River Esplanade has been a catalyst of renewal along Manhattan's East River. The latest phase of the plan—by SHoP Architects and Ken Smith Workshop—extends the current three-block-long Esplanade north, adding recreational amenities and addresses the challenges of building a new landscape beneath an elevated highway between Catherine Slip and Pike Slip in Lower Manhattan.. The so-called "Package 4" aims to create a "front porch" for the Lower East Side by introducing new street furniture such as conversation benches, bar stools, lounge chairs, picnic tables, and swing sets hanging from the FDR highway overpass. The new plan also includes the prospective installation of amenities such as elevated exercise platforms, a skate park, games tables, a synthetic turf field, waterfront fishing docks, and multiple bike paths. The project’s designers wish to integrate a significant amount of perspective and dimension on the site by conserving already-existing open lawns, installing light fixtures under the FDR highway overpass, building multi-leveled seating and benches, and planting a diversity of foliage. Pending approval from the New York City Council and City Planning, the project should be complete by Spring 2015.
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Who Builds Your Architecture? Panel Considers the Sustainability of Labor

The Vera List Center for Art and Politics at the New School has—under its director Carin Kuoni—been an instigator in drawings links between artistic and design practices and the real world of politics. The Center sponsors symposia, lectures, and exhibitions that draw links that are often crucial and obvious but not discussed by professionals and academics in the design professions. Once again it is highlighting such an issue with a series of discussions, Who Builds Your Architecture?, that connects construction and labor. This project emerged in part from two ongoing initiatives: Who's Building the Global U? by NYU faculty and students and Who's Building the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi? by a coalition of international scholars and curators. The second discussion in the series, WBYA 2.0, was titled Sustainability and Sustaining Human Life took place at The New School on Monday April 12 and featured an engaged panel that included: Phil Bernstein from Autodesk; Yale professor and dean Peggy Deamer; Ed Mayer, Senior Associate at FXFOWLE; Reinhold Martin, Columbia Associate Professor of Architecture; Walid Raad, Cooper Union Artist and Associate Professor; Brad Samuels, Pounding Partner at Situ Studio; William Sharples from SHoP Architects; Raphael Sperry, President, Architects/Designers/Planners for Social Responsibility; Columbia Planner Smita Srinivas; and Nisha Varia, a Senior Researcher at Human Rights Watch. The designers in the group tried to make connections between their work and that of those that build what comes off their drawings boards. Sharples, for example, showed images of his firm's new technology campus in Africa and described how the design is driven by a desire to have it manufactured and built by local African labor rather than by foreign contractors and builders. Whatever the reality of this project ends up being it did compel panelist Reinhold Martin to ask architects and designers to enlarge their notion of sustainability to include issues like labor rather than just focussing on technology and material issues as is most often the case in this country. Peggy Deamer who was one of the first architects to raise the issue of labor and architecture in writings like Practicing Practice brought the issue back home and pointed out that architects don't even think about labor practices in their own offices let along in far flung building sites in Africa and the Middle East. Architects, she pointed out, don't see themselves as laborers and this must change before they recognize the reality of actual design and construction. The event was organized by the Vera List Center in collaboration with Kadambari Baxi (Barnard+Columbia College, Architecture), Mabel O. Wilson (Columbia University GSAPP), curator and writer Beth Stryker, and Jordan Carver (Columbia University GSAPP) whose goal is to jumpstart a conversation that will lead to longer term solutions.
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New York City Council Approves SHoP-Designed Pier 17 Makeover at the South Street Seaport

Last Wednesday, the New York City Council unanimously approved plans to tear down the current Pier 17 in the South Street Seaport and build a new $200 million SHoP Architects-designed mall in its place, marking the end of the long and sometimes contentious ULURP approval process. Crain's reported that Dallas-based developer Howard Hughes made some concessions to the council including pushing back construction on the project to allow Hurricane Sandy-battered tenants to have an additional summer season, with construction now anticipated to begin on October 1st. SHoP's design calls for a mix of boutique and large retail spaces inside the 250,000-square-foot facility connected by open air pedestrian corridors. Large glass garage doors can be lowered during inclement weather to protect these open spaces. The new building will be capped with an occupiable green roof. As part of the City Council approval, the developers will also build two new food markets adjacent to the new structure in the old Link and Tin Buildings. The project is expected to be complete by 2015. Besides Pier 17, SHoP is also designing another waterfront mall in Staten Island called the Harbor Commons.  
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Domino Developer, Architects Discuss Project Details, Context of Brooklyn Waterfront Makeover

Developer Jed Walentas of Two Trees Management Co. stood up in front of a packed house at a community forum in Williamsburg last night to discuss his ambitious new redevelopment plans for the Domino Sugar Factory Refinery. Citing his family’s history in DUMBO, Walentas told the beer-sipping, tattooed crowd that his intention is to “build an extension of the neighborhood” that is “socially contextual.” The new plan incorporates significantly more commercial and office space, which Walentas says won’t financially benefit Two Trees, but speaks to his company’s philosophy and intent to draw from and embrace the historic and cultural fabric of Williamsburg. While the zoning map doesn’t need to change, the plans still need to go through the ULURP process once again. The new vision for the site puts an emphasis on making the Domino Sugar Refinery a “nucleus” for the neighborhood that would house commercial space and artist studios (some subsidized, some not). An additional building on Grand Street would also be dedicated for small neighborhood retail. Walentas said, like DUMBO, he would fill these space will mom-and-pop stores and promised the audience that there will be no big box stores such as Duane Reade or Starbucks. In addition to commercial, two large community spaces will also be part of the overall plan. From the get-go, affordable housing has been a critical issue in the redevelopment of Domino Sugar Site, and the initial plans that were approved—prior to Two Trees acquiring the property—promised 660-affordable housing units. Walentas says he’s committed to keeping the affordable housing units, which will be 60 to 80 percent of the area median income (AMI), and identical to market rate apartments. The exact income levels have yet to be determined. But while Walentas said that the redevelopment will be “contextual,” Vishaan Chakrabarti, partner at SHoP Architects, told the audience that won't be the case with the design. He acknowledged that the new development isn’t in keeping with Williamsburg’s low-scale, but said, “It will be high no matter what,” referring to any future development to be built on the waterfront. “It is not contextual,” said Chakrabarti. “But we can start creating a skyline we can be proud of.” Chakrabarti argued that the height difference between the old and new plans won't be noticeable to people in the neighborhood and provides several benefits such as more open space inside and a lighter and airier feel. Since the building will be turned perpendicular to the water, he says more light will filter in. But Hurricane Sandy has forced developers and architects to reshape their approach to waterfront development. Chakrabarti addressed some of the changes they plan on implementing from setting the park back to putting basements above grade and building sloped sidewalks to allow water to drain. “The park will act as a sponge because it will be made of permeable material,” said Chakrabarti. The conversation grew heated when a few community members expressed doubt over Two Tree’s commitment to affordable housing and questioned whether the infrastructure in the neighborhood could support this influx of people and new commercial and business sector. “Our intent is to be a long term owner,” said Walentas. “Our interests are aligned with the community’s interests.”
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Major League Soccer Responds to SHoP’s Leaked Stadium Renderings

Last year, plans were floated to build a new $300 million, 25,000-seat, Major League Soccer stadium in Queens' Flushing Meadows Corona Park, to be designed by SHoP Architects. Because of the contentious nature of using public park land to build a stadium, the project had remained out of public view, but early conceptual renderings were leaked by the Empire of Soccer blog following a lecture by SHoP principal Gregg Pasquarelli at Columbia University. According to Empire of Soccer, in a video of the lecture posted and since removed from Youtube, Pasquarelli is heard saying, "The project I’m not supposed to show (you) so I am not going to tell you where it is or what it is but it’s a new stadium that should be announced in the next couple of months." He described the facility as a new type of stadium without walls. According to Capital New York, MLS president Mark Abbott denied that the proposed stadium would look like the renderings and that SHoP may not be designing the final stadium, stating: "These drawings do not represent what they stadium will look like. In fact, we haven't selected an architect yet and will not start the design process until we have an owner for the club. This was simply a concept drawing that was done only to help determine the potential height and footprint. Any assertion that these drawings represent what a stadium will look like in Queens is wrong.
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Related Breaks Ground on Two SHoP-Designed Towers at Hunters Point South

While everyone is transfixed on SHoP's dramatic unveiling of its new plan for the Domino Sugar Factory on the Brooklyn waterfront, another SHoP-designed project began construction to the north on the Queens waterfront. The first two towers of the Hunters Point South development, what will be New York City's largest affordable housing project since the 1970s, broke ground, and the $332-million first phase could accept its first residents as soon as 2014. The first phase includes 925 permanently-affordable housing units, 17,000 square feet of retail space, an already-under-construction 1,100-seat school, and a new five-acre park. The first 619-unit tower at 1-50 50th Avenue will stand 37-stories tall and the adjacent 306-unit second tower at 1-55 Borden Avenue will be 32-stories tall. Both will feature breathtaking views of the Midtown Manhattan skyline including the United Nations Secretariat and the Chrysler Building. The project, developed by Related Companies with non-profit Phipps Houses, was designed by SHoP Architects with Ismael Leyva Architectsand is aiming for LEED Silver certification. The two towers will have distinct designs. During the initial design process in 2011, SHoP's Vishaan Chakrabarti told AN, "We asked, should they be twins, sisters, cousins, friends or strangers? And I think we ended up with friends." "After years of planning and partnership, we’re breaking ground on the first large-scale middle-class development to be built in our city in more than three and a half decades," said Mayor Bloomberg in a statement. "In just a few years, Hunter’s Point South will have all the makings of a great community – affordable homes, new transportation links, beautiful parks with sweeping views, and a brand-new school." To mitigate potential flood damage from storm surges in the future, the project's mechanical systems are elevated on upper floors with emergency generators on the roof. A concrete base serving as a flood wall line's the towers frontage facing the flood plain and entrances are designed so flood gates can be attached if necessary. Residents are expected to move in as early as 2014, with the entire first phase complete by 2015. Bloomberg also announced at the ceremony that the RFP for the second phase of Hunters Point South will be issued next month, calling for another 1,000 residential units and 28,000 square feet of community and retail space. When complete, the entire Hunters Point South development will house 5,000 new housing units on the 30-acre site.