Posts tagged with "SHoP Architects":

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52-story SHoP-designed tower revealed for downtown Detroit

New York City-based SHoP Architects, working with Detroit-based Hamilton Anderson Associates, has released new information and renderings of a two-acre site in downtown Detroit. It has been some time since we have seen any new developments for the former site of the J.L. Hudson’s Department Store and the fewer details about what was planned for the site has had Detroiters more than a bit curious. With this latest revelation, Detroit is looking at a much larger project than initially thought. “The driving force behind our design for the Hudson's site is to create a building that speaks to the rebirth of optimism in the city's future and an experiential destination that positively impacts Detroit in a meaningful way,” said William Sharples, principal at SHoP, in a press release. “The building is conceived around a huge and inspiring new public space, a year-round civic square that, both in its architecture and its culture, will foster and convey the feeling we all share when we work together to imagine what this great city can become.” The site of the new development was once home to one of Detroit’s largest retailers, Hudson's. The 25-story department store was at one time the tallest department story in the world. At over two million square feet, it was the anchor of the thriving Woodward avenue shopping corridor. With the declining economic state of Detroit in the 1970s, not even the retail giant could survive. The store was closed in 1983 and the building eventually imploded in 1998. Bedrock, the real estate firm co-founded by Detroit native Dan Gilbert, are developing the site. “Our goal is to create a development that exceeds the economic and experiential impact even Hudson’s had on the city. We believe this project is so unique that it can help put Detroit back on the national—and even global—map for world-class architecture, talent attraction, technology innovation and job creation,” explained Gilbert as part of the announcement. The Downtown Development Authority has approved a timeline which sets the ground breaking for the development on December 1st, 2017.
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2016 Best of Design Award for Unbuilt > In the Drawers: University of Miami Student Housing Master Plan, Phase 1

The Architect’s Newspaper (AN)’s inaugural 2013 Best of Design Awards featured six categories. Since then, it’s grown to 26 exciting categoriesAs in years past, jury members (Erik Verboon, Claire Weisz, Karen Stonely, Christopher Leong, Adrianne Weremchuk, and AN’s Matt Shaw) were picked for their expertise and high regard in the design community. They based their judgments on evidence of innovation, creative use of new technology, sustainability, strength of presentation, and, most importantly, great design. We want to thank everyone for their continued support and eagerness to submit their work to the Best of Design Awards. We are already looking forward to growing next year’s coverage for you. 2016 Best of Design Award for Unbuilt > In the Drawers: University of Miami Student Housing Master Plan, Phase 1 Architect: CO Architects Location: Coral Gables, FL

Using the home as the building block, CO Architects’ scheme for the University of Miami transforms the notion of dormitory life: Presenting multiple scales of social environments, each three-story home juxtaposes private with semi-private elements. Larger units lift from the ground to allow for passageways and program spaces beneath.

Honorable Mention, Unbuilt > In the Drawers: LaGuardia Airport Master Plan

Architect: SHoP Architects Location: Queens, NY

Selected as a finalist for the 2014 Master Plan Design Competition launched by Governor Andrew Cuomo and Vice President Joe Biden, the proposal responds to LaGuardia’s history of delays due to tarmac crowding by creating a two-island concourse that improves operations, offers a unified environment, and creates an appropriate gateway to New York City.

Honorable Mention, Unbuilt > In the Drawers: WWI Memorial: Path of the Americans

Architect: DXA studio Location: Washington, D.C.

Shining like stars, 116,516 points of light beaming from concrete walls, at once shed light on the memory of Americans lost in World War I and—alongside a central reflecting pool—serve as a metaphor for healing, resilience, and recovery.

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SHoP to give the Cleveland Cavaliers’ basketball arena a huge overhaul

New York–based SHoP Architects working alongside Detroit-based stadia specialists Rossetti are to give the Quicken Loans Arena a massive makeover. The stadium, known as "The Q," has been open since 1994 and is home to the Cleveland Cavaliers. While a new arena would cost up to $750 million (according to Quicken Loans), the proposed refurbishment is set to total $140 million.

The Cavs will pay $70 million of this, plus any overrunning constructions costs. The rest will come from the City of Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, and Destination Cleveland. Work will begin next year and the stadium will remain open during this period; the Cavs will keep The Q as their home until 2034.

Despite only being 22-years-old, The Quicken Loans Arena is one of the oldest facilities in use on the National Basketball Association circuit. SHoP and Rossetti's design features a new glazed facade which stretches the stadium's footprint closer to the street edge. This fenestration reveals an undulating arrangement of what appears to be wood panels which, given their location well inside the facade and north-facing orientation, don't seem to serve any shading purpose. Aside from aesthetics, entrance and exit gangway areas will witness an increase in space, thus aiding circulation—a necessity considering The Q hosts more than 200 events every year.

“The $140 million transformation, half of which the Cavalier’s will be paying, ensures that this public facility will remain competitive in the future,” Cleveland mayor Frank Jackson said in a press release. “This investment provides an innovative solution for extending the use and impact of The Q for years and years to come without the need for a much more expensive new arena. In addition, the seven year extension of the Cavalier’s lease through 2034 will represent one of the longest tenures in the same facility in all of sports.” Mayor Jackson, however, appears to be forgetting the wealth of stadia (for rugby, soccer, and cricket) in Europe and Australia that have endured for well over a century. Even Fenway Park in Boston and Wrigley Field in Chicago—home to the Red Sox and Cubs baseball teams respectively, surpass 100 years. Heck, the Indians' Progressive Field—a mere 200 feet away from The Q—opened six months before its basketball counterpart (sorry Jackson). Meanwhile, NBA Deputy Commissioner Mark Tatum said: “We understand the impact this project will have in continuing the great momentum we have all seen recently in the city. We look forward to holding our week of NBA All-Star events in Cleveland in the near future following the successful completion of The Q transformation project.”
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Construction worker falls and dies at former Domino Sugar Factory site

At 8 a.m. this morning, a construction worker fell two stories from scaffolding on the Domino Sugar factory site, 335 Kent Avenue, in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, near the Williamsburg Bridge. The former factory is currently being converted into affordable housing backed by New York City and designed by SHoP Architects with developer Two Trees Management. "We are overwhelmed with grief by this tragic accident and extend our deepest condolences to his family, loved ones and colleagues," a representative of Two Trees said in a statement. "All work has stopped on the site and we are working closely with the city to determine the cause of the accident." The Domino Sugar factory site is an open worksite, although union workers have performed specialty tasks onsite. This is the 11th construction worker death in the city this year according to the Department of Building. The majority of the construction worker deaths that took place last year were also on non-union worksites. The City Council is currently working on new legislation that would make worksites safer and the process of reporting injuries and fatalities more accurate. Now, a special session regarding this legislation has been called before the year’s end. Slated to open in 2018, the Domino Sugar Factory building will have a total of 500 apartments, 105 of which will be affordable units. The redevelopment will be a total of 600,000 square feet and will also include office space, ground-floor retail, terraces, and an open plaza, as well as access to the waterfront, a new five plus acre park designed by James Corner Field Operations, and a new ferry landing. The former factory is an exterior landmark, so the 19th-century redbrick facade will remain unchanged. However, new “industrial luxury” amenities will be used throughout such as exposed brick, ceiling beams, will define the interior spaces.
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The largest 3D printed object in the world, and more from day one of Design Miami/

It’s day one of the annual Miami art and design fairs and The Architect's Newspaper (AN) is back for another year. Today we are in the smaller Design Miami/ tent across the street from the gigantic Art Basel fair. This design fair is usually a mix of a few international prototypes by the world's best designers, lots of frilly and useless baubles like beaded fantasy animals and chairs meant for adult children, and finally original pieces by classic designers like Jean Prouvé, Le Corbusier, George Nakashima, and even Gaetano Pesce. If one knows what they like, the entire fair can be seen in 30 minutes. As in the past, the Design Miami/ tent is fronted by a small pavilion or folly, and this year SHoP Architects have created one of the best pavilions in recent memory. Titled Flotsam & Jetsam, SHoP worked to create the installation with Branch Technology, a Chattanooga-based fabrication firm, Dassault Systems, for project management, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, who provided a second 3D printing material technology (a biodegradable bamboo medium) for the surrounding seating. (Learn more about the installation, the largest 3D printed object in the world, in our prior coverage.) After Design Miami/, Flotsam & Jetsam will be reinstalled in the Miami Design District’s iconic Jungle Plaza to house an outdoor cultural event space for long-term public enjoyment. The space will be launched with the Institute of Contemporary Art, Miami on December 1, 2017. Inside the design tent, there was little that was new but a few items stood out: Konstantin Grcic’s limited edition chair/table he calls Hieronymus Minero in the Galerie Kreo booth, along with his glass and metal table with funny rubber wires coming from its black frame. The best lighting design came from The Future Perfect with their aptly named Floor Double Loop by designer Michael Anastassiades. Carpenters Workshop Gallery also showed a clever and beautiful glass ceiling light named Les Cordes by Mathieu Lehanneur. Finally, South Africa’s Southern Guild presented their Num Num bronze and glass dining table. The standouts of the fair—and some are stunning—are the classic 20th century pieces and we will present them in a separate post.
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SHoP Architects announced as winners of the 2016 Panerai Design Miami/ Visionary Award

New York-based SHoP Architects has been named as this year's winners of the Panerai Design Miami/ Visionary Award. Now in its third year, the award recognized SHoP for their "bold, evocative architecture, philanthropic initiatives, sustainable development, and innovative practices/entrepreneurship." As a result, the firm will get to see their installation, Flotsam & Jetsam built in the Miami Design District's Jungle Plaza. In their 20 year history, SHoP has had projects built across the U.S. but has found most success in New York City. Currently, a super tall mixed-use tower is going up in Brooklyn—the borough's first. "SHoP is a place where people come together without any prescribed idea about what the esthetics of a building or public space should be, then we take complex problems and solve them with both beauty and technical proficiency," SHoP Founding Principal Gregg Pasquarelli said in a press release. "Working with Design Miami has been a great experience and a perfect opportunity to explore the expressive possibilities of tomorrow's architecture." Using Chattanooga-based 3D printing and fabrication firm, Branch Technology, Flotsam & Jetsam looks to push the boundaries of the 3D-printed medium (especially in terms of scale). The installation—stylistically reminiscent of work by Marc Fornes & Theverymany—sees a series of arching bamboo legs join to form a canopy and seating area. The bamboo however, is no ordinary bamboo. SHoP chose Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to supply a biodegradable bamboo 3D print medium. This method of construction can produce forms on an unprecedented scale, and when built, SHoP's Flotsam & Jetsam will be the largest 3D-printed structure in the world. Located in the Jungle Plaza, the installation will play host to an outdoor cultural event space. Here, talks, performances, and cocktail events will take place. SHoP's work will also be launched with the Institute of Contemporary Art, Miami (ICA Miami) in Spring/Summer 2017 along with a community program for bringing "world-class" public sculpture to the city. SHoP will be presented with their award at the Design Miami/ press reception on Tuesday, November 29. “SHoP represents exactly what the Panerai Design Miami/ Visionary Award is meant to recognize: innovation, inspiration and an outstanding point-of-view,” said Rodman Primack, chief creative officer, Design Miami/. “For the first time, we will be installing the commission long-term in the Miami Design District and I cannot think of a better practice to conceive this installation. We are thrilled with the pavilion design and delighted to honor SHoP for the 12th edition of Design Miami.”
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Potential clients reportedly fear BIG is too BIG, pick smaller firms instead

This post is part of our years-long running Eavesdrop series (think page 6 for the architectural field). It's your best source for gossip, insider stories, and more. Have an eavesdrop of your own? Send it to: eavesdrop[at]archpaper.com.

Sources close to the juries for two recent invited competitions tell The Architect's Newspaper that in both cases, smaller firms—SHoP and OMA—were chosen over Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) because the jurors believed that the firm's top dog, Mr. Ingels himself, might be more focused on the WTC 2, the Google headquarters, the project formerly known as the Big U, and the Hyperloop. They are concerned that he might not have time to pay much attention to other, smaller projects. The suspicions may come as a surprise to Rem Koolhaas, for whom Ingels worked in his early career. 

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NYC DCP to review plan for SHoP-designed supertall on Manhattan’s Lower East Side after all

In a surprising reversal, the Department of City Planning (DCP) will review JDS Development's plan to build a supertall in Manhattan's Two Bridges neighborhood. Developers Roy Schoenberg and Gary Spindler (of Park-It Management) had planned to build on an adjacent site. The pair sued JDS in New York State Supreme Court recently, claiming that in 2012 Michael Stern's company co-opted the air rights they intended to buy from Settlement Housing Fund and Two Bridges Neighborhood Council. Schoenberg and Spindler had plans to build a 300,000-square-foot, mixed-use affordable housing on the site. Instead, the nonprofits nixed the pending contract and sold the parcel's air rights to JDS for a cool $50 million, Crain's reports. Now, Schoenberg and Spindler have withdrawn their application for their project, so the DCP will review JDS's application for an 80-story, 1,000-foot-tall greenish cascading tower by SHoP at 235 Cherry Street, pictured above.
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SHoP makes the Brooklyn skyline with a “brooding, elegant, and badass” supertall… There goes the neighborhood?

If you zone it, they will build, and they will build tall. New York–based SHoP, in partnership with JDS Development Group, revealed plans earlier this year to build 9 Dekalb Avenue, a 73-story, 1,066-foot-tall residential tower fused to the landmarked Dime Savings Bank in Downtown Brooklyn. Last month, the design cleared a crucial hurdle when the Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) approved the tower’s design and consequent modifications to the bank.

“There’s a sort of brooding Gotham to it,” noted Gregg Pasquarelli, founding principal of SHoP. “There’s a little bit of badass to it, but it’s quite elegant at the same time. Isn’t that what we all want to be as New Yorkers?” The 417-unit building is clad in bronze, stainless steel, and stone, with view-maximizing interlocking hexagonal exposures. Pasquarelli explained that the facade detailing is such so that when two sides of the hexagon are viewed from an oblique angle, it will resemble one face, a sleeker reference to the grand old New York skyscrapers like Rockefeller Center and the Chrysler Building.

Michael Stern, founder of JDS Development Group, proclaimed: “The tower will be Brooklyn’s next icon. Brooklyn was really missing that one iconic statement that was worthy of the borough. This building will really put Brooklyn on the map.” Drawing from the landmark on-site, the spacing of the tower’s vertical facade elements mirrors the spacing of the bank’s neoclassical columns. The color and materials palette picks up on the bank’s colorful stone interiors, which will be converted to retail, while parts of the bank’s roof will be used for the building’s private outdoor spaces.

“The downtown rezoning of Brooklyn in 2004 has been very successful. This is a place where the city could handle density. It’s an incredible kudos to the city they upzoned that area, that they thought about tall towers,” said Pasquarelli. At the prow of Flatbush and Dekalb, the building will be visible from all over Brooklyn, and its distinctive facade will reinforce its prominent position on the skyline.

He and Stern enjoy experimenting with exteriors. Referencing the terra-cotta facade on 111 West 57th Street and the cladding on the East River–facing American Copper Buildings, Pasquarelli intimated that developers and architects are obligated to build for the public realm. “Some people get to live in these buildings, but we all have to live with the exterior.”

While preservationists sometimes bristle at the modification of an individual landmark, Gina Pollara, executive director of the preservation advocacy organization Municipal Arts Society (MAS), thinks there’s a larger issue that’s expressed in the development of tall towers like 9 Dekalb. “For us, it’s not really about the towers itself. Most of these supertalls are going up as-of-right. Because they’re not asking for any variance or any change, there’s no opportunity for public comment.” This tower was unusual, she elaborated, because it involved a landmarked structure. “These buildings are so out of context or out of scale with the neighborhood, and there’s no space for public comment until developers release their renderings. There’s no discussion of the cumulative effects these towers are having on public space.”

In an interview with AN, Stern said that he could not react to critiques like MAS’s (which he had not heard about), “but I can tell you that the commissioners had comments ranging from, ‘the best of urbanism’ and ‘flawless,’ and the LPC approved the project unanimously, as did the community board. It’s something we’re quite proud of.”

Pollara would like to see a better conversation around the 100-year-old zoning code, and reform beyond Mandatory Inclusionary Housing and Zoning for Quality and Affordability, the recently codified zoning text amendments. “It’s time to make zoning much more transparent—not just to the layperson, but to elected official,” Pollara said. “We need to get in front of the issue rather than being at the mercy of what is being built around us. Preservation in the 21st century is not necessarily rallying around a specific building, but looking at open space, light, air—all of the elements we want to preserve. We don’t want to live in a city that’s created by default.”

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SHoP Architects to design National Veterans Resource Complex at Syracuse University

Today, Syracuse University announced New York City-based SHoP Architects the winners of a six-month competition to design the new National Veterans Resource Complex (NVRC) on the school's campus. Programmatically, NVRC will include classroom spaces for veteran-focused programming, as well as a conference center and a roughly 1,000-seat auditorium, both of which can host community activities, lectures, and national events. Gallery spaces will exhibit the robust history of veteran support at the school. The NVRC will offer state-of-the-art vocational and educational programs designed to advance the economic success of the region’s and the nation’s veterans and military families, including research and programming connected to the veteran and military sectors. “The programmatic demands on this building, its historic symbolism for the University, and the gateway role it will play on the campus dictate a very high level of performance in its design—a building that is at once inviting to all and a specialized tool perfectly suited for the specific work that will take place there,” SHoP's William Sharples said in a statement. The NVRC is part of the Central New York Regional Economic Development Council’s winning proposal titled Central New York: Rising from the Ground Up, which is part of Gov. Cuomo’s $500 million Upstate Revitalization Initiative (URI). The facility will house the Syracuse University and Regional Student Veteran Resource Center, the Army Reserve Officer Training Corps, the Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps, U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs “Vet-Success on Campus,” the National Center of Excellence for Veteran Business Ownership, Veteran Business Outreach Center and Accelerator, Syracuse University’s Office of Veteran and Military Affairs, and the University’s Institute for Veterans and Military Families (IVMF). The committee included Chancellor Kent Syverud, J. Michael Haynie, vice chancellor of veteran and military affairs, Andria Costello Staniec, associate provost for academic programs; Julia E. Czerniak, associate dean of the School of Architecture; Jared Grace, graduate student in the School of Architecture and Army ROTC cadet battalion commander, Breagin K. Riley, assistant professor of marketing in the Whitman School of Management, Peter Sala, vice president and chief campus facilities officer, and Michael A. Speaks, dean of the School of Architecture. The process was led by Martha Thorne, dean of the IE School of Architecture and Design in Madrid. The NVRC is expected to be complete in the spring of 2019.
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Brooklyn’s first skyscraper over 1,000 feet given approval

Late last year, AN picked up a trail that SHoP Architects were planning a "super skinny supertall" skyscraper set for 9 DeKalb Avenue in Brooklyn. Now, the project has finally gathered some momentum: it's been granted approval from the Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC). According to 6sqft, the LPC showered the project, which is being back by Michael Stern’s JDS Development and the Chetrit Group, with compliments. They reportedly described the project as “flawless” and “enlightened urbanism at its best.” Developers had to tread carefully, considering the proximity of the skyscraper to one of Brooklyn's historic architectural treasures. Occupied most recently by JP Morgan, the development is giving the landmarked Classical Revivalist Dime Savings Bank a new breath of life. In doing so, developers will turn the hall into a public and retail space and restore the lavish interior decor and ornate exterior marble facade. The LPC were inclined to comment that the restoration “improved the vision of this historic landmark” with one commissioning member remarking that it was "similar to the Parthenon sitting on the Acropolis.” You can find SHoP's LPC presentation here. To accommodate the skyscraper, which will sit adjacent the Beaux-Arts banking hall, developers are also asking for two local low-rise buildings to be demolished to make way. If (or rather when) realized, the skyscraper will be the boroughs first 1,000+ in height, rising to 73 stories high topping out at 1,066 feet. Hexagonal forms can be found throughout tower as an homage to the footprint of its neighbor. Gregg Pasquarelli of SHoP Architects reportedly said how they wanted to put forward a different tower design compared to the slab-like high-rises also going up around the area. Subsequently, the skyscraper's facade at street level aims to evoke the fluted ionic columns of the Bank through reflective glass fenestration with bronze mullions alongside white marble columns. As the tower stretches upward, the bronze ribbons join grey spandrel and vision glass panelling. Here black metal is employed in a similar, linear fashion running up the building's facade. Set to be complete by 2019, SHoP's Brooklyn high-rise will house around 500 apartments, all available to rent. In this selection, a range of luxury condos will be thrown in while 20 percent will be kept below the market rate.
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SHoP’s new copper-clad tower on Manhattan’s East River

New renderings and construction photographs were released of the latest SHoP–designed Manhattan tower, located on First Avenue between East 35th and 36th streets. SHoP partnered with SCAPE Landscape Architecture and JDS Development Group to design American Copper, a pair of 900,000-square-foot residential buildings whose most prominent feature is a 100-foot-long, three-story tall, skybridge, suspended 300 feet aboveground, that connects the two towers at a jaunty angle. The skybridge, according to the developers, is the first major one constructed in New York in over 80 years. The steel trusses that connect the bridge weigh almost 421,000 pounds, while the facade is clad in over 5,000 copper panels, each measuring about six-by-ten feet. On terra firma, two lobbies with 25-foot ceilings open up onto a park with a water feature.
While the towers are diminutive (the west tower is 540 feet tall, the east, 470) compared to the firm's 1,438-foot-tall 11 West 57th Street, its features are not. The building's 761 units will have access to 60,000 square feet of amenities, many of which double down on the quotidian luxury offerings: Residents can slough off dead skin in a Turkish-style marble hammam; work out in a fitness center that includes a rock climbing wall; bring their children to the playroom, lounge, and juice bar; grill on the roof; chill in the hot tub; or splash around in the 75-foot-long lap pool in the skybridge (from where swimmers can probably see, though wall-to-wall glass the plebes schlepping to the Metropolitan Pool over in Williamsburg).