Posts tagged with "Selldorf Architects":

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David Zwirner taps Renzo Piano to design new $50 million Chelsea gallery

Art dealer David Zwirner has announced plans for a new, five-story, $50 million gallery to be designed by Renzo Piano. The gallery will rise on a corner lot at 540 West 21st Street that is currently under demolition. The developer is Casco Development, and the gallery will be linked to a 20-story residential tower but stand as a separate structure. The gallery building will be constructed close to Zwirner's current galleries in Chelsea, which includes one on West 19th Street and one on West 20th Street. Zwirner also owns a gallery on the Upper East Side, and is set to expand in Asia, with a gallery opening in Hong Kong on January 25th. Including the West 21st Street gallery, this would bring the total number of his galleries to seven worldwide. Zwirner indicated that after the opening of his new gallery, he would probably close the gallery space on 19th Street, which he rents. As Zwirner told The New York Times, Piano is "one of my great heroes." Zwirner, who previously worked with Annabel Selldorf on his current galleries, also said that Piano was the developer's choice. While Piano is well known for his museum projects, this will be the architect's first commercial gallery. Zwirner is one of the art world's most successful dealers. This five-story building, with three floors dedicated to gallery space, would serve as a kind of calling card and headquarters for his art empire. While the design process is in the early stages, Piano told the Times that his design would emphasize “a visual psychological connection between the building and the street,” as in his design at the Whitney Museum of Art. The news comes as Zwirner prepares for a 25-year anniversary exhibition, opening this weekend on January 13th. The new gallery is scheduled to open in the fall of 2020, with groundbreaking expected sometime this spring.
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Annabelle Selldorf designs new Marianne Boesky Gallery in Aspen

New York—based architect Annabelle Selldorf (under her firm Selldorf Architects) has designed a new space for the Marianne Boesky Gallery in Aspen, Colorado. The new 3,000-square-foot project, known as "Boesky West," will occupy the former cabin of 1800s photographer James “Horsethief” Kelly.

Working with local studio David Johnston Architects, the cabin will be reconfigured to serve as a new arm for the Marianne Boesky Gallery, which is located in Chelsea, New York. While the inaugural exhibition is still in the works, the gallery will open in Aspen on March 8, 2017. However, works by artists Frank Stella and Larry Bell, who are good friends with Marianne Boesky, will be on show come March 8. The exhibition will look at the pair's work in the realm of abstraction, material, light, and space while forming a discussion around their practices.

“I have long been inspired by Aspen’s extreme landscape, and the creativity that it has fueled among artists, musicians, writers, and so many other individuals of diverse background and interests," said Marianne Boesky in a press release. "With the evolution of my vision for the New York-based locations, now seemed the right moment to launch a new platform to inspire further engagement with this vibrant landscape... I see Boesky West as a space to present the work of our artists in a completely different context and environment than New York, expanding the experience of their work and introducing it to new audiences. At the same time, Boesky West offers the gallery more opportunity to experiment and collaborate with not only artists, but with curators, art historians, critics, and other members of the community.”

Last year the gallery's flagship Chelsea location doubled its size to 13,000 square feet and now, with the new space in Aspen, Boesky intends to create opportunities for interaction among artists and Aspen's dramatic landscape and its cultural community.

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Selldorf Architects tapped for Frick Collection expansion

New York–based art-world veterans Selldorf Architects will helm The Frick Collection’s enhancement of its existing Upper East Side Manhattan home, the Henry Clay Frick House. Selldorf was selected from 20 candidates after an 18-month review period.

The Frick’s road to expansion has been rocky. In June 2015, in the face of strong criticism from architects and preservationists, the museum abandoned plans to replace a gated garden with an historicist six-story tower by Davis Brody Bond. That added to a string of failed expansions (in 2001, 2005, and 2008) but the museum vowed to increase its exhibition space.

According to the Frick representatives, this latest round will work within the building’s existing footprint. The upgrades include converting a set of second-floor rooms to galleries, creating a new special gallery on the main floor, improving circulation and accessibility for those with physical disabilities, and installing new facilities dedicated to educational programming and conservation.

For now, the expansion is in its earliest stages. The configuration of the second-floor galleries and the placement of the new facilities haven’t been decided but more details will be revealed during winter 2017–2018.

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Terra-cotta facade bridges its historic surroundings and modern technology

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A new 34,000-square-foot residential building in New York's Noho neighborhood resonates with a landmarked district of highly crafted facades by echoing their predominantly low-rise scales, regular structural bay rhythms, and large windows. The 11-unit building is located on Bond Street—a two-block street that has become notable for its wave of contemporary architecture (Herzog & de Meuron's first residential project in the United States, as well as buildings by Deborah Berke Partners, and BKSK Architects, among others). Among these recent projects, 10 Bond Street, designed by New York-based Selldorf Architects, further adds to a context where historic and contemporary architecture coexist in complementary fashion. Sara Lopergolo, partner at Selldorf Architects, said that the project team was inspired by the deep russet colored brick of existing buildings adjacent to the project site on Lafayette Street. "Working on the proportions and the scale of the building was important to us. We wanted to find something very grounded in the neighborhood, but also present a contemporary face for this new building.” Selldorf Architects worked with Boston Valley Terra Cotta to design a rainscreen cladding of profiled panels in a custom glaze. The panels are trimmed with weathered steel, which rises beyond the facade to frame a rooftop terrace. On grade, the entry is marked with a mahogany ship-lapped siding.
  • Facade Manufacturer Boston Valley Terra Cotta
  • Architects Selldorf Architects
  • Facade Installer Crowne Architectural Systems
  • Facade Consultants Frank Seta & Associates, LLC
  • Location New York City, NY
  • Date of Completion 2015
  • System reinforced concrete with terra cotta rainscreen
  • Products Weathered steel from FacadeTek; Custom glazed terra cotta and standard Terraclad panels from Boston Valley; Exterior shades: Nysan-Hunter Douglas Windows: Peerless Storefront windows and corner windows: YKK; Masionette exterior and garage door: Mahogany ship-lapped siding with marine grade clear finish; Penthouse Trellis: Weathered steel structure with mahogany louvers
According to Lopergolo, the terra-cotta manufacturing process is akin to an “advanced Play-Doh machine,” allowing the production of highly specific custom shapes and colors. “We've been working with terra-cotta for a very long time and like to think of this as our material even though others are using it. What is so lovely about it is that its color is customizable, and that you can shape it anyway you like. The glaze creates a certain depth and character that you can't get out of other materials. The way the light catches it is very nice.” Bill Pottle, Boston Valley's international sales manager, said that the two companies have collaborated on a handful of projects. “Around 2000, the first terra-cotta rainscreen job came to the United States. Since then, the material has become very popular—it has grown from something rarely used by architects to a material that has made it into an everyday palette. 10 Bond Street is part of a second wave of terra-cotta jobs we are seeing that incorporate larger, more three-dimensional shaped pieces, not just flat rainscreen panels.” In the case of 10 Bond, the panels were manufactured around 36-inches long and weighed in at around 150 pounds each. The larger, more complex panels require more thought be put into the detailing of attachment clips. According to Boston Valley, often this results in modification of standard clip details, or in some cases the development of a one-off custom attachment detail. According to Pottle, most terra-cotta panels have a shrinkage rate of around seven percent, which is accommodated by digital software when producing dye geometry. "We use the same clay body mixtures and the same formulas so we can determine the shrinkage rate well before production." To help manage shrinkage throughout the process, the panels are constructed with a hollow core that incorporates webs to support a scalloped profile. The backs of the panels are flat to allow for the pieces to lay on a flat surface throughout the curing and glazing process. Full-size mock-ups allowed the architects to confirm a specific coloration and helped the project team to finalize custom attachment clip detailing. Lopergolo said one of the challenges with the weight of the panels was ensuring open joints between panels were dimensionally uniform. Pottle said the mock-up process is also an essential opportunity for the manufacturer to confirm quality control. Mock-ups allowed Boston Valley to see how the custom dyes were performing and helped ensure the extrusion process ran properly prior to the upcoming production phase. They will examine the extrusion process for quality control and confirm the rate of shrinkage of the pieces is accurate. A skewed street grid presented the design team with what Lopergolo called a "fun and challenging" floor plan layout exercise. A living room location at the southwest corner receives a wrap around corner window unit, and benefits from an automated exterior shading system, which is integrated into the buildings two primary facades—a southeastern and southwestern exposure. Occupants can override sensors that drive exterior shade motors. Selldorf Architects, who work on a range of project types—galleries, museums, housing—said its work with New York Landmarks Preservation Commission is especially significant. "We enjoy working with Landmarks—what they contribute is important for the city. With these condominium buildings, of course, the goal is to make nice apartments for our clients, but we also see this as an opportunity to give back to the city. We're very proud of this project—we'll still receive random emails from strangers saying they passed by the building and loved it—it is very sweet that people take the time to do that."
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New renders reveal Selldorf Architects-designed Museum of Contemporary Art in San Diego expansion

The Museum of Contemporary Art in San Diego (MCASD) celebrated its 75th Anniversary by officially announcing the launch of a $55 million expansion and renovation, led by New York-based Selldorf Architects. The expansion plans have been in the works for several years, with The Architect’s Newspaper reporting back in February that Selldorf was rumored to be selected for the project.   Now, having raised $56.7 million of their $75 million capital campaign, the museum has announced that its plans are moving forward. According to the San Diego Tribune, the new additions will double the size of the building from 52,000 square feet to 104,000 square feet, and quadruple its gallery space from 10,000 to 40,000 square feet. The new design also includes a new public park open on all days and hours except for private museum events, a new gift shop focused on the museum's collections, and the conversion of the 500-seat Sherwood Auditorium into a 20-foot-high gallery. MCASD will close in January 2017 and is scheduled to reopen in late 2019 after construction is complete but the museum cafe will remain open. Outgoing director Hugh Davies told the La Jolla Light that the museum has always had strict space constraints on its collection of works. “Expansion of our La Jolla facility will allow us to consistently display our collection, as well as present compelling contemporary exhibits and expand our education programs,” he said at the 75th Anniversary celebration. This announcement comes after Selldorf Architects were selected to revamp the Frick Collection and design the Swiss Institute's new space.
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Selldorf Architects chosen to upgrade and expand The Frick Collection

New York-based Selldorf Architects, no stranger to designing for the art world, will be helming The Frick Collection's enhancement of its existing home, the Henry Clay Frick House in Manhattan's Upper East Side. The Frick's efforts to expand have previously not gone smoothly. The museum faced outcry when it planned to remove a garden and add six stories to its east wing. (The Frick House was originally designed by Thomas Hastings of Carrère and Hastings and built from 1912 to 1914.) Those plans were abandoned but the Frick, saying it still faced a shortage of exhibition space, vowed to find other ways to expand. In a press release, the museum said, "Working in partnership with Frick leadership and staff, Selldorf Architects will develop a design plan that addresses the institution’s pressing needs to accommodate the growth of its collections and programs, upgrade its conservation and research facilities, create new galleries, and—for the first time—allow for dedicated spaces and classrooms for the Frick’s educational programs." These upgraded facilities, the release added, will be within the building's "built footprint" and will "foster a more natural and seamless visitor flow throughout the Frick’s exhibition galleries, library, and public spaces." Selldorf was unanimously recommended by the search committee, which spent 18 months evaluating some 20 architects. Ian Wardropper, director of The Frick Collection, said this of Selldorf Architects in a press release:
The firm understands and appreciates the value of institutional mission and has clearly demonstrated in past projects—such as New York’s Neue Galerie and the Clark Art Institute in Williamstown—how new designs can enrich, rather than overwhelm, already distinguished architectural spaces. Such an approach is essential to our project, which seeks to preserve the peaceful and contemplative experience that the Frick provides to its visitors.
The new enhancements will include "the opening to the public—for the first time—of a suite of rooms on the second floor of the historic house, for use as exhibition galleries," "the creation of a new gallery for the presentation of special exhibitions" on the main floor, "the creation of dedicated, purpose-built spaces to accommodate the Frick’s roster of educational and public programming," and "the establishment of state-of-the-art conservation spaces...." By way of some background, in the 1930s, when converting the house into a museum, architect John Russell Pope doubled its size and demolished its library to make way for a larger library that could accommodate the museum's collection. Additional expansions occurred in 1977 (which created the 70th Street Garden) and 2011 (which enclosed part of the Fifth Avenue Garden). This won't be the only art-related New York project that Selldorf Architects will have on their plate: the firm is also helming the new St. Mark’s Place location for the Swiss Institute. More details can be found here on the Frick Collection's website and a full press release can be found here.
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Aranda/Lasch wins competition to design furniture for 14+ Foundation’s Chipakata Children’s Academy in Zambia, Africa

New York–based architecture and design firm Aranda/Lasch by Benjamin Aranda and Chris Lasch won 14+ Foundation’s international design competition to design furniture for the Chipakata Children’s Academy in Zambia, Africa. The design, titled “Nesting Furniture,” is lightweight, movable, and weather resistant in response to the project's surroundings (both of Zambia and the school) and the materials and resources available in Sub-Saharan Africa. “Our design is a furniture system that uses the local craft of wattling, or twig weaving, to make many different configurations of furniture. Every element will be sourced and made locally by artisans in Zambia,” said Aranda in a press release. Aranda/Lasch is known for its modular, geometric approach to design and has created everything from houses and art venues to furniture and installations. Each piece of the “Nesting Furniture” series is flexible, with the smaller pieces neatly fitting into the larger pieces (hence the term nesting) and various arrangements of the seats and tables can be used for playing, eating, learning, and crafting. “Aranda\Lasch’s submission stood out to the jury as imaginative and beautiful, yet in other ways simple and practical,” Joseph Mizzi, co-founder of 14+ Foundation, said in a press release. “In addition, the ability for their design to move into a production phase relatively quickly, along with the capability for this furniture to be fabricated using locally sourced labor and materials, is perfectly aligned with the philosophies of our architecture and the core beliefs of our foundation.” Susan Rodriguez of Ennead Architects designed the Chipakata Children’s Academy with Frank Lupo and Randy Antonia Lott for 200 children in grades one through six. The facility also provides care for orphans and children in need in the local community. The 14+ Foundation, which sponsored the project, is a New York City–based nonprofit that focuses on providing education and art programs to children in need in Africa. It is currently developing its second project, Mwabwindo School in Mwabwindo Village, Zambia, with Selldorf Architects, slated to open January 2018.
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Archtober’s Building of the Day: David Zwirner Gallery

This is the fourth in a series of guests posts that feature Archtober Building of the Day tours! David Zwirner Gallery 537 West 20th Street New York, NY Selldorf Architects Lisa Green, art world veteran and partner at Selldorf Architects, guided our fourth Building of the Day Tour, the 2016 AIANY Design Award-winning David Zwirner 20th Street Gallery. The concrete façade of the 30,000-square-foot, ground-up art gallery elegantly distinguishes the space from the many brick converted warehouses and garages that make up Chelsea’s gallery district. Poured in place in five stages over the course of six weeks, the 8-inch pine formboard concrete façade was an ambitious undertaking guided by a concrete consultant and expert who has worked closely with I.M. Pei. Informed by a long relationship between Zwirner and Selldorf, the public exhibition spaces were built to accommodate Zwirner’s collection of minimalist estate artists like Donald Judd, Dan Flavin, and Fred Sandback (currently on view), as well as borrowed works from museums for special exhibitions. On the ground floor is a 5,000-square-foot, columnless gallery that can be readily adapted with temporary walls to fit the needs of each exhibition. The cool and expansive space, with double-height ceilings, northern-facing sawtooth skylights, and a poured concrete floor, contrasts with the smaller and more intimate gallery following upstairs, with 14-foot ceilings, white oak floors, warm, southern light exposure, and contractible roman shades. The third, fourth, and fifth floors hold a mixture of office and private viewing spaces, each illuminated by natural light. The five green roof spaces, including a beautiful rooftop deck, were designed by Dutch landscape architect Piet Oudolf, whose designs are on view next door on the High Line. Despite the temperature and moisture control systems required in art spaces, Zwirner was committed to green building standards, making the David Zwirner 20th Street Gallery the first commercial art gallery to achieve LEED Gold status. Join us tomorrow for the underground retail experience, Turnstyle! About the author: Julia Christie is the Office Manager at AIANY / Center for Architecture.
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Selldorf Architects to renovate new St. Mark’s Place location for Swiss Institute

The Swiss Institute (SI) announced this morning that it will be moving to the corner of St. Mark’s Place and Second Avenue in Manhattan’s East Village. Selldorf Architects will be renovating the preexisting building, a former bank. The new 7,500-square-foot building will house four levels, including a basement, ground floor, second floor, and roof. This scheme will contain spaces for exhibitions, projects, public programs, a library, a bookstore, and a rooftop. It is slated to open spring 2017. "This new building offers tremendous opportunities to expand upon our mission and serve a growing audience, to whom we will continue to offer forward-looking exhibitions and public programs, always free of charge," said Swiss Institute director Simon Castets in a press release. "We look forward to joining and contributing to the diverse community of cultural organizations and artists that have called the East Village home for many years." The SI is a nonprofit contemporary art institution with a focus on experimental art that promotes forward-thinking artists and designers with exhibitions and programs. So, part of the draw to its new location is its proximity to Anthology Film Archives, Cooper Union, Danspace Project, ICP, La MaMa Experimental Theatre Club, New Museum, New York University, The Poetry Project, and The Public Theater. In addition to announcing its relocation, the SI said that nine new trustees will join the board and that Maja Hoffman will be taking over the role of chair. "I am thrilled to begin my tenure as chair with the support of such a stellar, expanded and international Board of Trustees, at the start of an exciting new era for the organization. I am looking forward to working with the exceptional Swiss Institute team as they thoughtfully develop the institution and its program in the context of such a storied, creative neighborhood,” Hoffman said in a press release.
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Selldorf-designed Hauser Wirth & Schimmel to open in Los Angeles with a Revolution

The March 2016 opening of Hauser Wirth & Schimmel’s Arts District complex is getting closer and the gallery just announced its inaugural Los Angeles exhibition: Revolution in the Making: Abstract Sculpture by Women, 1947–2016. The all-female show will fill the galleries and outdoor spaces of the former Globe Mills complex retrofitted by Annabelle Selldorf of New York City's Selldorf Architects with Creative Space, Los Angeles. The campus will include a bookstore, a publications lab, a bar and restaurant, a garden and courtyards, and commissioned permanent artworks that engage the architecture. Co-curated by Paul Schimmel, former chief curator at MOCA, and art historian and critic Jenni Sorkin, Revolution in the Making highlights 100 works that illustrate a changing approach to practice, abstraction, installation, craft, and tactility. The press release makes a case for contemporary lessons from many of these now-historical works: “The exhibition examines how elements that are central to art today—including engagement with found, experimental, and recycled materials, as well as an embrace of contingency, imperfection, and unstructured play—were propelled by the work of women who, in seeking new means to express their own voices, dramatically expanded the definition of sculpture.” Featured artists include postwar practitioners Ruth Asawa, Lee Bontecou, Louise Bourgeois, Claire Falkenstein and Louise Nevelson, as well as radical influencers from the 1960s and '70s: Eva Hesse, Sheila Hicks, and Yayoi Kusama. The curators also included groupings of work by “postmodern” and contemporary artists working in environmental, installation, and performance modes, including Isa Genzken, Liz Larner, and Jessica Stockholder. Jackie Winsor’s sculpture 30 to 1 Bound Trees will be exhibited in center of Hauser Wirth & Schimmel’s outdoor courtyard. A 20 foot-high mast of white birch saplings and hemp rope, the piece is being recreated for the first time since 1971.
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New York City’s iconic Four Seasons Restaurant inside the Seagram Building is at the center of a renovation dispute

Four_Seasons_restaurant Traditionalists went into a tailspin over proposed modifications to the landmark Four Seasons Restaurant, a gastronomic and architectural emblem of New York City housed in the historic Seagram Building. The high-ceilinged enclave, clad with French walnut walls, plays daily host to high society a big business in Midtown Manhattan. The eatery garnered landmark status in 1989 for the building’s architectural prowess. Nevertheless, the New York City Landmark Preservation Commission (LPC) cautions that this designation does not shield the Mies van der Rohe Barcelona chairs, Florence Knoll banquettes, Eero Saarinen cocktail tables, and table settings by L. Garth Huxtable. Building owner and noted art collector Aby Rosen of RFR Holdings recently filed plans to make changes to the restaurant, reportedly without consulting owners Julian Niccolini and Alex von Bidder. While the LPC approved the proposed new carpeting without qualm, they balked at a removal of the cracked-glass and bronze partitions separating the dining area and bar. Originally installed by legendary architect Philip Johnson, who designed the space with Ludwig Mies van der Rohe in 1959, the partitions would be replaced by movable ivy planters to open up the space. Selldorf Architects is also considering nixing the large walnut panels separating the square-shaped 60-foot-by-60-foot Pool Room from the dining room on the mezzanine. These will be replaced with five panels, the outer two of which would be operable for reconfiguration of the space. According to Rosen, this would improve the flow between the mezzanine and the Pool Room without the upper tier framing the space. “This landmark is elevated to a level where any kind of intervention would not be living with preservation,” objected LPC Chair Meenakshi Srinivasan. Conservationists bristled last year when Rosen entertained an eviction of the Le Tricorne Picasso tapestry hanging inside the restaurant in order to facilitate reparations to the wall behind it, where a “potentially serious steam leak” from the two-story kitchen had purportedly crippled the structure. The preservation commission retorted that removal of the tapestry would cause it to “crack like a potato chip.” A New York State judge issued an injunction prohibiting Seagram from removing the painting, but Rosen, a real estate developer and avid collector of post-war art, is in conservationists’ crossfire again for daring to alter a landmark. “These are features that are integral to the sense of space. Not just decorative but have architectural meaning and value,” said Commissioner Diana Chapin. Edgar Bronfman Jr., whose family owned Seagram, claimed that RFR’s proposal displays “utter contempt” for the icon. RFR representative Sheldon Werdiger maintains that the changes are restorative rather than invasive. “We’re not making changes as much as we’re restoring. Our local press is trying to make it into a controversial situation,” he told Arch Record.
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Archtober Building of the Day #30> Sunset Park Material Recovery Facility

Archtober Building of the Day #30 Sunset Park Material Recovery Facility 472 2nd Avenue, 29th Street Pier, Brooklyn Selldorf Architects Eadaoin Quinn, the education and administrative coordinator at the SIMS Municipal Recycling Facility presented a classroom full of Archtober enthusiasts with a detailed and informative presentation of the automated process of material sorting and recovery that is recycling. Quinn told us about the machinery of sorting, starting with the “liberator shredder,” which opens the large garbage bags that recyclables arrive in by truck or barge. Each step of the almost entirely automated process has a purpose-built system of conveyor belts and sorting machines that transform bags of trash into re-sellable bales of like material. The sorting processes themselves are interesting: the Ballistic Separator is comprised of rotating planes that push flat plastic bags up an inclined plane while, at the same time, glass is broken and sent downward to another conveyor. The Eddy Current separator can distinguish between ferrous and non-ferrous metals. Optical sorters can “see” what kind of plastic is passing by on the belt, and signal a puffer to blow the lighter material out of the line onto another conveyor. Today was cleaning day, so we did not get to see all of these machines in action. But we did see 400 tons of trash waiting to make its way into the process. Selldorf Architects received an AIANY 2014 Merit Award in Architecture for the structure that houses the piles of trash and the machines that sort and bale them. The Design Awards jury stated: “Extraordinary project. Not many people are capable of recognizing how construction to cover garbage can be nice.” Alas, none of the building’s architects attended the tour. Too bad, because it was a spectacular day out there on the Gowanus waterfront. There was a good sized crowd, and a couple of really smart kids asking intelligent questions.
Cynthia Phifer Kracauer, AIA, is the Managing Director of the Center for Architecture and the festival director for Archtober:  Architecture and Design Month NYC.  She was previously a partner at Butler Rogers Baskett, and from 1989-2005 at Swanke Hayden Connell.  After graduating from Princeton (AB 1975, M.Arch 1979) she worked for Philip Johnson,  held faculty appointments at the University of Virginia, NJIT, and her alma mater.