Posts tagged with "San Jose":

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Adobe unveils a glassy office tower for its San Jose headquarters

New renderings have been released for Adobe’s latest addition to its San Jose, California, headquarters, an 18-story office tower designed by multinational architecture firm Gensler. The tech company filed finalized plans with the City of San Jose last Thursday, according to The Mercury News, and the new building could hold up to 3,000 employees when complete. The building would be an addition to Adobe’s existing complex. It has been dubbed 'North Tower' and will sit on the northern side of the campus. Adobe is considering making the tower a mixed-use building and plans on building out 650,000 square feet of retail and office space in the tower, as well as above- and below-ground parking. The building itself will be linked with the other offices via a sky bridge and will sit to the east of the adjacent State Route 87. As shown in the renderings, Gensler has taken a playful approach to the building’s massing and cut a massive triangular gap in the tower’s upper section, reminiscent of Adobe’s stylized “A” logo. Diagonally-slanted louvers will wrap the building and run parallel to the cutout, and Adobe will use the open space created by the cutout to lay a plaza on top of the retail podium. A series of smaller rooftop gathering spaces are planned for the building’s other setbacks. The sky bridge will feature concrete pavers and wood seating areas alongside plantings of native grasses, evoking a High Line-type feel. According to Adobe, construction is expected to begin sometime in 2019. Adobe is far from the only tech company to pursue a new headquarters this year: Gensler’s NVIDIA building opened, Google and BIG unveiled a new campus in Sunnyvale, Microsoft revealed that it would be upgrading its Redmond, Washington complex, and the search for an Amazon HQ2 host city has kicked into high gear.
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One of California’s largest developments wins key legal battle

A judge has ruled that CityPlace, a long-stalled mixed-use development slated for a former municipal landfill site adjacent to the new Levi’s football stadium in Santa Clara, California, can finally head toward construction, despite vocal opposition from the neighboring city of San Jose. The $5.6-billion project is being developed by Related Companies and is designed by RTKL and Elkus Manfredi Architects as a mixed-use transit-oriented development populated with offices, storefronts, housing, and green spaces. However, the project has been caught up in a lawsuit for months over objections from San Jose officials regarding the relatively small amount of housing available in the plans for the development, Mercury News reports. The 240-acre complex is expected to bring 5.4 million square feet of offices, 1.1 million square feet of retail, a 700-key hotel, 250,000 square feet of “food and beverage,” and 190,000 square feet of entertainment uses to the area. The project is also estimated to generate over 25,000 jobs, but will only provide 1,680 residential units to house those potential workers, and the arrangement has San Jose officials worried that their housing-strapped city will be left housing the remaining workforce. As is consistently the case in California due to Proposition 13—a 1970s-era initiative that caps property taxes on homes—smaller municipalities like Santa Clara are disincentivized from producing and approving housing-heavy developments in lieu of more lucrative commercial and office projects. The end result—as is evident across Silicon Valley—is that many projects are designed with little to no housing, an arrangement that, aside from limiting more environmentally-benign mixed-use development, has fueled the state’s ongoing housing crisis. With CityPlace, San Jose city officials are worried the new jobs-heavy development will tax existing schools, streets, and other public infrastructure with new residents, while simultaneously adding to the pool of people who work in the area but cannot find a place live nearby. The Environmental Impact Report for the 9.2 million-square-foot project, however, looked into these concerns and was approved by the Santa Clara City Council in 2016 nonetheless, after completion of a California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) review by state regulators. The judge’s ruling cited these approvals as reason for the project to continue to move forward. The project is among the largest new developments on the west coast and is among several densification projects slated for the region surrounding San Francisco. If built according to the current timeline, the first phase of the project will begin construction in 2019 and finish around 2022. Later phases would be built over the following five- to 10-years, depending on market conditions.

Getting Up Close and Personal with Modular Construction

Modular construction is hot here in the Bay Area, and has captured the interest of developers, investors and residents in search of a more effective, potentially less-expensive, way to build housing. Join us as we visit a brand new modular housing project in San Jose for an up-close look at how these units, which are constructed off-site before being trucked to San Jose, are set in place and locked together. Co-presented by First Community Housing. + Martin Keller / First Community Housing + Chris Schmidt / Guerdon Modular Buildings + Chris Rimes / Proset Modular
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Winners announced to redesign San Jose’s St. James Park

A design team made up of San Francisco–based CMG Landscape Architecture, Future Cities Lab, Page & Turnbull Architects, and ARUP engineers has been awarded a contract to rehabilitate San Jose, California’s historic St. James Park. The City of San Jose held a national competition to redesign the neglected park back in 2016 with the aim of reintegrating and modernizing the city’s largest, most urban recreation space. The competition’s top four entries included competing submissions lead by New York City–based !Melk, Berkeley, California–based Meyer + Silberberg, and Philadelphia-based WRT. The city’s 2nd Street was extended through the St. James Park in 1957 after a voter initiative, turning the formerly unified park into two, smaller areas that went underutilized and became blighted. Like its competitors, CMG’s winning entry—titled REMEMBER | IMAGINE—focuses on halting automobile traffic down the multi-modal street that bisects the park. An at-grade light rail line currently runs along 2nd Street and is expected to remain in the park moving forward. CMG’s proposal aims to install a series of picturesque, Victorian-inspired gardens with meandering trails around the perimeter of the park. An esplanade of shade trees, picnic areas, a cafe, and a dog park will fill out the spaces around the light rail line. One corner of the park will be anchored by a multi-use pavilion designed by Future Cities Lab. The octopus-like pavilion will be made up of half a dozen or so arcades that emanate from a bandshell-covered stage. According to renderings released by the winning team, the colonnades will provide shade for benches and walkways across this section of the park. In a press release touting the winning commission, Nataly Gattegno and Jason Kelly Johnson of Future Cities lab said, “We designed the pavilion to be an open and illuminated space seamlessly integrated with the park. We want to encourage neighbors to stroll through the colonnades and interact with the pavilion day and night,” adding, “When there is a scheduled event, the pavilion will transform into a high-tech performance venue with superb acoustics and lighting.”  
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NBBJ’s “generative” courtyard office headquarters for Samsung

The two 10-story towers are clad in white metal and clear glass, carefully balanced to reduce solar heat gain and provide a sense of lightness.

Samsung’s new North American headquarters, designed by NBBJ, is a landmark facility in Silicon Valley embracing new urban guidelines developed by San Jose officials to prioritize active streets and environmental sensitivity. The project creates a sense of lightness with a transparent, environmentally responsible facade, and has been used as a case study project within NBBJ’s international network of offices. The compound is composed of two ten-story towers designed around an interior courtyard and floating open-air gardens. The architects adopted the diagram of a semiconductor as inspiration for the building, defined by an energized void space between separated slabs. Connecting stairs located at every two floors establish a centralized “3-D Main Street” linked by pocket parks. The ground floor extends an open public program into the adjacent city, providing a connection to the tech community. Despite working in a ten-story office tower, Samsung employees are never farther than one story from outdoor space. Utilizing a courtyard typology to maximize daylight and natural ventilation into a flexible open office layout, the project anticipates LEED Gold certification. The facade system for the facility plays a significant role in the project, achieving three key functions: encouraging social interaction, communicating a brand identity, and sensitively responding to the environment by incorporating renewable energy and managing solar conditions.
  • Facade Manufacturer Benson
  • Architects NBBJ
  • Facade Installer Benson
  • Facade Consultants ARUP
  • Location San Jose, CA
  • Date of Completion 2015
  • System white metal, glass exterior unitized panel
  • Products unitized curtain wall products (painted aluminum & glazed curtain wall), TS & metal stud framed with ceramic tile and plaster finishes.
Rather than designing an all-glass facade, NBBJ developed a white metal, glass, and terracotta exterior with an undulating gradient of punched window openings responsive to environmental criteria. For example, the building orientation is aligned to San Jose’s city grid, which is rotated off a north-south axis, causing direct heat gain to be managed across multiple facades. This assisted with solar heat gain concerns and established an aesthetic identity for Samsung’s headquarters. The interior facade is noticeably more transparent, utilizing a floor to ceiling glazing system. Collaborating with ARUP, NBBJ designed the facade to be a shop-built assembly—it was craned into place, ensuring a high-quality, controlled assembly process. The architects teamed with Benson, who fabricated the facade panels. The building is formally very simple, but becomes activated by people, fostering a collaborative environment. This is a “generative” building, designed for flexibility to allow for as many new ideas as possible. A collaborative, interactive spirit drove the project’s design from the start. The outcome is an open, tolerant, flexible building that enables possibilities and drives innovation.
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NBBJ’s just-opened Samsung headquarters seeks urbanism in Silicon Valley

Samsung’s new North American headquarters in San Jose is now open for business. Designed by NBBJ, the 1.1 million-square-foot, $300 million building presents itself as a counterpoint to the introverted campuses that dot Silicon Valley: Facebook’s self-contained, Gehry-ific HQ or Foster’s secluded spaceship for Apple. Unveiled in 2013, the design went from concept to construction in rapid time. According to the architects, the designers and Samsung worked closely with the city to create a scheme that supports the city’s urban design mandate for densification, walkability, and bikeability. (AN recently reported that San Jose also has a mandate to generate jobs, a mission that is at times at cross-purposes with the need for housing in the region.) The building is sited to connect to the city’s light-rail system. The design is meant to encourage employees to leave their desks at lunch and walk across the landscaped gardens to the cafeteria, to engage just a bit in the activities of urban life. And the inverse is also true. A courtyard in the middle of the office block (the building reveals itself to be two bar buildings connected by bridges on alternating floors) is open to the public and will offer retail amenities. Samsung’s 2,000 employees can look out through the interior glass facade at the choreography of everyday life passing through the South Korean company’s own Piazza del Campo. “The world’s largest electronics company is changing itself into innovator. This brought about a need to change the internal culture of the workplace,” explained Scott Wyatt, the NBBJ partner in charge in the firm’s Seattle office who led the workplace strategy. “We asked ourselves ‘How can a building help them compete for talent and enable innovation?’” For Wyatt the answer on view in San Jose suggests that open floor plates, and connection to the outdoors both physically and visually, and interaction between employees promotes health and performance. Moreover, the design responds to a need for architecture flexible enough to accommodate team-based work and, in trendy workplace parlance, mobility. As such, collaborative spaces face the courtyard while the more solo desks and focused work areas are located around the perimeter. The gradated window openings on the exterior facade are calibrated to the need for more or less daylight. “Work any time in any place, but in teams is changing how buildings are made,” he noted.
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Oakland A’s Exploring New Stadium

The Oakland A's are the best team in baseball this year. Maybe that's why they're considering a move from one of the sport's most outdated stadiums, the Oakland County Coliseum (AKA the Overstock.com Coliseum). According to the San Francisco Chronicle, A's owner Lew Wolff has begun talks with an architect to build a stadium at the Coliseum site. The team just signed a 10-year contract with the Oakland Coliseum board to stay on the site at least through 2018.  "I've always loved Oakland. I love our fans. But we need a new venue," Wolff told the Chronicle. Other groups of investors have proposed stadia at Howard Terminal on the Oakland waterfront and in San Jose, but the new contract seems to solidify the team's presence in its current location. Wolff has so far declined to name the architects he's working with on the new stadium. Built in 1966, the Coliseum was last renovated in 1995. The facility, and adjacent Oracle Arena, sit on 132 acres, including 10,000 parking spaces. The A's are one one of a handful of California teams moving, or on the lookout for a new stadium in either football or baseball. The San Francisco 49ers are first: they're moving into their new Levi's Stadium in Santa Clara this fall.  
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NBBJ Designing Samsung’s New Silicon Valley Campus

As Apple and Facebook have proven, corporate complexes are all the rage these days in Silicon Valley. Samsung (Apple's phone nemesis) is the latest tech titan to add to the roster of architectural Bay Area campuses, rivaling Apple’s planned circular headquarters and Facebook’s Gehry-designed West Campus. The company plans to build a 1.1 million square foot sales and R&D headquarters on its current North San Jose site. Designed NBBJ, it will include a 10-story tower, an amenity pavilion, and a parking garage. Based on renderings released to the Silicon Valley Business Journal last month, the tower will contain three distinct volumes wrapping around an open courtyard; the parking structure will be covered in living walls; and the five-pronged pavilion will showcase a perforated roof design. Design documents also reveal that various floors will house open-offices, 300+ work stations, a fitness room, and several terraces.
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Datagrove weaves a tangled electronic web at ZERO1’s Art + Technology Biennial

Fabrikator

Use of cell phones is strongly encouraged for tech devotees flocking to Silicon Valley's 'social media whispering wall'

As its name implies, Datagrove is literally a grove of data or a "social media 'whispering wall,'" if you will, that aggregates locally trending Twitter feeds and parrots them out of speakers and LCD displays woven into the digital branches of the installation. Nonprofit art/technology network ZERO1 commissioned the installation from San Francisco–based experimental design company Future Cities Lab for its Art + Technology Biennial in San Jose, CA, now on view through December 8, 2012. The theme of this year's Biennial is "Seeking Silicon Valley," which seems like a particularly appropriate place to plunder data normally hidden away in smartphones and amplify it for all to hear using custom sensors, text-to-speech modules, LEDs, and LCDs capable of responding directly to people in the immediate vicinity.
  • Fabricator  Future Cities Lab
  • Designer  Future Cities Lab
  • Location  San Jose, CA
  • Date of Completion  September, 2012
  • Materials  LEDs, LCD panels, IR sensors, Arduino, plywood, polypropylene, acrylic. galvanized steel
  • Process  Digital modeling (Rhino, Grasshopper, Firefly, Rhinocam), CNC milling, laser cutting, vacuum forming, heat slumping
In order to "render the invisible aspects of Silicon Valley visible," Nattaly Gattegno and Jason Kelly Johnson, the principals of Future Cities Lab, created a lattice structure interwoven with Twitter trending technology by Onehouse, IR sensors, TextSpeak's Text to Speech Module, LEDs by Super Bright LEDs, and Sparkfun's WiFly Shield and LCD panels that translate geo-located data feeds into light and sound. "As one approaches the installation a series of infrared sensors trigger the sensing pods to light up, which, through a series of embedded speakers, whisper to you the trending information like...Have you heard about...Oracle, or Have you heard about ...Olympics," said Gattegno. Before weaving everything together, Gattegno and Johnson first tested all of the materials individually while also developing "physical prototypes of the interactive sensing pods containing all the electronic components." After a series of tests they decided the best way to house the electronics was to seal them in vacuum formed 2-ply acrylic shells which they wove into a larger structure made from bent acrylic tubing and galvanized steel conduit. "The acrylic is heated and molded in a series of custom CNC milled jigs while the steel is bent over another set of custom jigs," Gattegno said. "Although made up of two material systems, the acrylic and steel interlock in a very deliberate way, structuring each other and suspending the sensing pods within them." All of the electronics, both the acrylic-shelled pods and the systems they operate with—the text-to-speech synthesizers, motion sensors, LCDs and LEDs—are part of an Arduino-based micro-controlled system produced and engineered in-house at Future Cities Lab's San Francisco workshop. The components were then secured to a base made from CNC milled plywood and polypropylene and installed onsite in the courtyard of San Jose's historic California Theater, creating a gathering place for the geographically disparate and disconnected Silicon Valley. The longer you view or interact with Datagrove, the easier it is to make sense of the data. Gradually, you discern patterns and begin to detect a natural cadence from what initially seems like a tangled web of Silicon Valley's verbal overflow.             Photographs by Peter Prato. Additional assistance from Ripon DeLeon, interns Osma Dossani and Jonathan Izen, assisted by David Spittler.
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On View> “Local Color” Celebrates Experiments With Bright Hues

Local Color San Jose Museum of Art 110 South Market Street San Jose, CA Through January 13, 2013 The way people experience color can be subjective, as preference for a particular color is a personal one. Artists, however, have evoked certain emotions such as pleasure or gloom by manipulating color in value and hue in their pieces. San Jose Museum of Art’s Local Color explores the effects of color through a range of works selected from their permanent collection, displaying over twenty artists who experimented with color. Viewers will be able to experience a myriad of emotions as they venture through this multihued exhibition which will include simple black and white pieces as well as saturated, colorful works. From the modest palette of blue, gray and black in the hypnotic painting Wheel by Barbara Takenaga to the luscious and bright colors featured in Bischoff’s photographs of Barbie dolls, the exhibition’s various pieces will allow visitors to recognize color itself as a medium in art.
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Don’t We all Need One of These? SPUR Opens San Jose Office

One of the Bay Area's most effective urban instigators, SPUR (San Francisco Planning and Urban Research Association) is opening an office in San Jose. The move came about for a few reasons, says the group. First, San Francisco has a declining share of the region's population, so it makes sense to branch out. And second, most planning decisions are made locally, so SPUR needs to establish footholds in the area's major cities. The new branch office was made possible by a successful $1 million fundraising campaign that will fund operations over the next three years. Leah Toeniskoetter will head up the new office and brings a background in real estate and economic development and finance. "San Jose wants to be walkable, it wants more transit-oriented development and sustainability," SPUR Director Gabriel Metcalf told the San Francisco Business Times. "In many ways, San Jose’s challenge is America’s challenge." A move to Oakland could be next on SPUR's agenda.
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House Proud: AIA-HUD Awards for Excellence

Four housing projects were spotlighted today by the American Institute of Architects' Housing & Custom Residential Knowledge Community and the U.S. Department of Housing & Urban Development as laudable examples of affordable housing architecture, neighborhood design, participatory design, and accessibility. Category 1: Excellence in Affordable Housing Design Paseo Senter at Coyote Creek, San Jose, Calif. David Baker + Partners, Architects A new urban district, this affordable neighborhood fronts a newly created main walking street, or Paseo, that connects the arterial roadway to the area’s adjacent park. At its midpoint, the Paseo widens into a public plaza that holds the main entries to the two residential districts. The bold color palette has proved extremely popular with residents and the community, who consider the project a signature addition to the neighborhood. The property is 100% handicapped- and wheelchair-accessible, and the pool features an automatic lift. Category 2: Creating Community Connection Award Arbor Lofts, Lancaster, Calif. (Pictured at top) PSL Architects This 21-unit affordable housing development for artists is the first urban infill project to be completed since the city implemented its new Downtown Specific Plan to transform this mostly vacant city area into a place of historic, cultural, social, economic and civic vitality. The design incorporates many sustainable design methods; among these, the use of high efficiency mechanical systems qualifies the design to exceed California Title 24 Energy Code requirements by 20% and the lighting system exceeds the requirements by 24% which significantly reduces the use of energy. Category 3: Community-Informed Design Award Congo Street Green Initiative, Dallas building community WORKSHOP A tight-knit community consisting of 17 single-family and duplex houses, all built before 1910, recognized the need for re-development, but also did not want to relocate. Through a series of conversations with the residents, a plan was developed to restore and/or reconstruct six owner-occupied homes. The idea is centered around the concept of creating a temporary home, or “holding house,” to house the family whose home was currently under renovation. To date, three resident’s homes have been completed and the fourth is under construction. Category 4: Housing Accessibility—Alan J. Rothman Award Madrona Live / Work, Seattle Tyler Engle Architects PS A converted storefront built in the early 1900’s for a client with an extensive art collection required a flexible and multi-functional space that provides wheelchair accessibility while not making that the primary focus of the design. Entering from the sidewalk, the main living space has a single level polished concrete slab for unrestricted wheelchair access. A floating concrete countertop that steps from low to high accommodates disparate height requirements of the clients and exemplifies how the design provides an elegant solution on a tight construction budget. The jury for the 2010 AIA/HUD Secretary Awards includes: Jury chair, Andrew V. Porth, AIA, Porth Architects, Inc.; Natalye Appel, FAIA, Natalye Appel + Associates Architects; Geoffrey Goldberg, AIA, G. Goldberg and Associates; Grace Kim, AIA, Schemata Workshop; Jane Kolleeny, Architectural Record and GreenSource; Luis F. Borray, Assoc. AIA, U.S. Department of Housing & Urban Development and Regina C. Gray, PhD, U.S. Department of Housing & Urban Development.