Posts tagged with "San Diego":

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San Diego’s Embarcadero Getting Long-Needed Makeover

While it was never topped with a highway like its San Francisco cousin, San Diego's Embarcadero has long been a car-dominated no-man's land of wasted opportunity along the city's stunning bay. No more! Earlier this year the city broke ground on a redevelopment of the area, including new pavilions, plazas, a 105-foot-wide esplanade, and bike and walking paths. The area will be planted with hundreds of new trees and set with new street furniture and decorative lighting. Phase one, encompassing 1.2 miles, should be done by next summer.  The project, guided by the North Embarcadero Vision Plan, is being paid for by the Port of San Diego and the city of San Diego, acting through the  Centre City Development Corporation.
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Wings Sprouting Again in San Diego

It looks like wings are hot in San Diego (and apparently LA, too). Recently we reported that Zaha Hadid was building a wing-like house in La Jolla, and now we learn via the San Diego Union-Tribune that the Midway aircraft carrier museum has proposed "Wings of Freedom," a 500-foot-tall  sculpture consisting of two wings (they've also been described as sails, a tribute to maritime activity on San Diego Bay) on the south end of the city's Navy Pier. The structures, designed by Tucker Sadler & Associates, would be made of titanium shaped around a steel frame. “If this image of us is half as successful as the Sydney Opera House is to Australia, it’ll be worth billions of dollars,” said local businessman and philanthropist Malin Burnham, who has advocated for the wings. Detractors of the plan say it would block views of the bay and be an eyesore for the area. “I’m not sure we have to put up another 500-foot towers to others’ egos,” said Don Wood, a member of the Navy Broadway Complex Coalition, which has fought several ideas for the city's waterfront.
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Firm News> Miller Hull Opens Office in San Diego

Seattle architecture firm Miller Hull, a  past winner of the AIA national Firm Award, may be best-known for their work in the Pacific Northwest, but they've also been active in San Diego for the last seven years. Now the firm is finally opening an office in the city, giving them a physical presence and simplifying things for their architects and for clients. They'll start out with five people in the office, including design partner Craig Curtis and managing partner Norman Strong, who will split their time between San Diego and Seattle. Miller Hull's projects underway in the city include the renovation of the San Ysidro Land Port of Entry, which is the busiest border crossing in the world; and the UC San Diego Structural and Nano Materials Engineering Building. They've also completed the mixed-use Wharf at Point Loma Marina and the Pier 32 Marina.
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The Latest From Gwynne Pugh

We recently ran into Gwynne Pugh, former principal at Pugh + Scarpa (now Brooks + Scarpa), who earlier this fall left his longtime job (22 years to be exact) to start his own firm, Gwynne Pugh Urban Studio. It seems that he's already quite busy working as an urban design consultant. Pugh, who sees himself as an intermediary between cities and developers, is consulting with agencies in the cities of San Diego, Carson, and Long Beach. He's also teaming up with Bridge Housing on an affordable housing project in Santa Monica and working with Coca Cola to review its sustainability scheme for its bottling plant in Downey. Pugh is also president of the planners' division of the  League of California Cities. "It's been a great opportunity for me to focus on some of these issues I care about," said Pugh, who right now is working with three employees, and plans to move to a new office in Playa Vista in the beginning of next year.
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Car Free In San Diego?

It seems that Times Square's pedestrian-friendly experiment is catching on.. According to The San Diego Union Tribune, The Plaza de Panama in San Diego's Balboa Park is proposing to go car-free with a $33 million plan by Mayor Jerry Sanders and Qualcomm co-founder Irwin Jacobs.  The proposal would remove 67 auto spaces in the park, and a 900-space parking structure will be built at the south of the park for the displaced cars.  If achieved, the new space opens up possibilities not only for strollers but for public artwork and new landscaping. The plan has its detractors, mostly because there is the possibility that the parking structure could impose a fee (parking in the park is currently free). A committee has been created to help raise the funds and the media has stated that there are donors already, who have history of funding park improvements. The new pedestrian friendly space is reflective of the 1915 San Diego Exposition, where the center was completely open to walkers. Officials are hoping to restore it for the centennial anniversary in 2015.
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Get Set, Go, Party

Yesterday, we posted the feature from our current California issue, "On Their Mark," about a new show at the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego highlighting seven local firms. While sending over the pictures of the exhibition, Mix: Nine San Diego Architects and Designers, that went into our slideshow, the fine folks at MCASD also sent along these nice photos from the opening party, which were taken by Lauren Radack. In case, like us, you couldn't make it. (And if you know anyone in these photos we may not have mentioned, do tell).