Posts tagged with "San Diego":

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Chris Cross: Where in the World is Chris Genik?

Since architect Chris Genik left Daly Genik (now called Kevin Daly Architects) and became dean at the NewSchool of Architecture and Design in San Diego in 2010, we have lost touch with him. He’s no longer the dean, and we haven’t heard a peep about what he’s up to. If you know of his whereabouts please contact eavesdrop immediately. And speaking of Chrises, we hear that our friend Christopher Mount, who curated MOCA’s New Sculpturalism exhibition before things with Jeffrey Deitch went haywire, is opening up a gallery inside the Pacific Design Center dedicated to architectural prints and related art.
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Gregory Marick Named President at San Diego’s NewSchool of Architecture & Design

The NewSchool of Architecture & Design (NSAD) in San Diego has a new president. Gregory J. Marick is a career educator and former president of the Orange County and Hollywood divisions of the Art Institute of California (AIC). “This is an exciting time for NewSchool of Architecture & Design. We're creating a dynamic, interdisciplinary environment that provides opportunities for students to specialize not only in architecture, but in other related design fields such as game programming and interior design,” Marick told AN. At the AIC in Hollywood, Marick oversaw improvements to academics, student life, and facilities that helped earn the school re-accreditation. Later in Orange County, he boosted enrollment, improved student retention, and established a formal partnership with a college in Beijing. NSAD, which currently offers programs in architecture, construction management, digital media arts, and interior design, is adding courses in product design, animation, game art, and game programming. “Design has the power to transform our lives, and I am thrilled to be joining NSAD now as we develop even more opportunities for students to succeed anywhere in the world,” Marick said.
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Forty Years Later, San Diego Gets Its New Central Library

San Diego’s New Central Library, which opened earlier this fall, was a long time coming. The project has been in the works since at least 1971, when the first of 46 studies on the subject of a new library building was published. Rob Wellington Quigley, FAIA, who designed the $184.9 million structure with Tucker Sadler & Associates, came on board in 1995. Why did he stick with it so long, through budget problems and four site changes? “It’s in my backyard,” Quigley said. “It was just too important a project, culturally, to the city, and to all of us...though it was very difficult, economically, to withstand all the stops and starts.” The centerpiece of the New Central Library is its steel-mesh dome, which, Quigley explained, is actually a composite of eight three-point arches. “It’s all about buoyancy,” Quigley said. “It feels like it’s lifting off the building, as opposed to a traditional dome, which is weighing the building down. It’s sort of the anti-dome, really.” The dome’s steel-mesh sails serve both practical and symbolic ends. On a pragmatic level, the latticework protects the library’s collections from sun damage while allowing some natural light to filter through, mimicking the experience of reading under a shade tree. At the same time, the dome is a metaphor for self-improvement. “Visually the dome is not complete. It’s clearly in the act of becoming a dome, becoming something,” Quigley said. Quigley’s vision for the library remained remarkably consistent throughout its long gestation. The architect credits the residents of San Diego, who articulated their priorities in a series of public workshops. At the top of the list was their desire for an iconic building—hence the dome. The workshop attendees also asked for a formal reading room, in addition to the series of intimate work spaces favored by contemporary library programmers. “What the community understood is that reading rooms aren’t just about library science, they’re about community,” Quigley said. “The library is kind of the last bastion of equality: everyone’s equal, everyone can come, no ticket required.” The reading room and the library’s other public spaces—including a topiary sculpture court, auditorium, meeting room, and art gallery—are clustered at the top of the building. Typically, Quigley said, public areas are relegated to a library’s lowest floors, to facilitate access. But at the design workshops the architect organized, residents pointed out that rooftop views are usually restricted to those who can afford a penthouse apartment. “If an architect had suggested it, they probably would have revoked our license,” Quigley quipped. But the New Central Library wasn’t just the work of an architect. It was a product of decades of public debate and reflection, according to Quigley. “In my mind a building that does not function emotionally is not utilitarian. This is what we needed, permission from the grassroots,” he said.
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First Doggy Doo-Doo in Flight: HNTB Designs a Pet Potty at San Diego Airport

Are you afraid of taking Rover with you on your next flight because he might have to go potty in the airport? Well, pet-packing passengers flying through San Diego’s Lindbergh Field can rest easy. The airport’s recent $1 billion “Green Build” Terminal 2 expansion includes the nation’s first and only “pet relief” comfort station. Located between gates 46 and 47, the 75-square-foot rest room is decked out with features to get your four-legged friend in the mood to go, including ersatz grass and a fire hydrant. This may be the first, but it won’t be the last. Tom Rossbach, director of aviation architecture at HNTB, told the San Diego Union-Tribune that the firm is offering the amenity to its other airport clients.
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San Diego Architect Dies After Assault By Employee

Sad news in San Diego. Local architect Graham Downes, 55, was killed after being assaulted by one of his employees outside of his home last Friday morning, reports NBC San Diego. Downes, founder of Graham Downes Architecture, had practiced in the city for over 20 years. Local police found him unconscious in front of his house, in the Bankers Hill neighborhood, on Friday morning. Higinio Soriano Salgado, 31, was arrested and booked on attempted murder charges. “It’s devastating. It’s difficult to imagine what tomorrow will be like, but we have to take care of tomorrow,” Alex Veen, CFO of Blokhaus, a collection of companies to which Graham Downe Architects belongs, told NBC San Diego. Downes specialized in luxury hospitality, office, and retail design. He was working on, among other projects, the Hard Rock Hotel San Diego, the Palomar Hotel, Hotel La Jolla, Nico's Bar, and shops for Charlotte Russe, Quiksilver, and Patagonia.
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BIG’s Bergmann To Teach Studio on Freeway Impacts

BIG partner Kai-Uwe Bergmann (courtesy BIG) Fourteen architecture students will be thinking BIG this spring as the NewSchool of Architecture and Design (NSAD) in San Diego teams up with Bjarke Ingels Group to offer a design studio led by Kai-Uwe Bergmann (pictured), partner and director of business development at the world-conquering firm. Starting in April, students will explore the impact of freeways along key sections of the coast, with San Diego acting as an urban laboratory. They'll also be asked to propose uses to make freeways like the I-5 more community-friendly. Working directly with Bergmann, the budding architects will also get an immersion in the firm’s “Yes is More” and "Hedonistic Sustainability" philosophies. “When we explored themes with BIG for this NSAD studio, from the start their interest was in something that would have an impact, such as dealing with large urban systems, patterns or infrastructure,” Kurt Hunker, NSAD director of graduate programs said in a statement.
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Architect’s Plan Would Add A Bike and Pedestrian Tube to San Diego’s Coronado Bay Bridge

From the top of San Diego's soaring 200-foot-tall Coronado Bay Bridge, architect Lew Dominy says you can see Mexico, but outside of special events when the bridge is closed to automobile traffic, pedestrians and bicyclists who might stop to admire the view are prohibited. Dominy, principal at San Diego-based domusstudio architecture, has a plan to build a tube through the distinctive archways of the Coronado's support piers that would bring multi-modal access to the bridge. Dominy hatched the concept three decades ago while riding his bike across the bridge during a special event. "When you're 200 feet in the air looking at the city, it's just an unbelievable view," Dominy said. At the time he was interning for the the Coronado Bay Bridge's designer Bob Mosher, and developed an interest in the 11,179-foot-long span connecting the cities of San Diego and Coronado. Dominy shelved the proposal, but recently began promoting the concept anew. Over the past six months, he has been meeting with officials from the US Navy, the Cities of San Diego and Coronado, the bridge's owner CalTrans, and others to promote the idea and determine if the project is feasible. Dominy said the response so far has been positive. "With all the agencies and jurisdictions involved, this will take some time to become real," Dominy said in an email. "But the momentum is building, and we have gotten very positive responses everywhere we've been with the project. We think it could be an iconic draw for cyclists and runners and visitors to San Diego." The plan, estimated to cost around $50 million, calls for a steel cylinder to be built inside the 12-foot-diameter pier arches, with structural attachments to the bridge's existing steel box girders. After speaking with engineers who retrofitted the bridge for earthquakes a decade ago, Dominy said "it appears from initial analysis that no extra support is needed" for the new bike tube. The bridge is built with a 4.7 percent grade, meaning the ascent and descent over the two mile length of the bridge fit within existing ADA regulations. Dominy said the tube structure would be open but include railings and other protections to keep people from falling or jumping. He said the design could also include viewing areas at various points with glass floors to heighten the drama of the view. To move the project forward, Dominy hopes to raise funding for a feasibility study, that among other things, will help determine if adding the bike and pedestrian tube will impact clearances of large ships that move underneath the bridge.
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San Diego’s Embarcadero Getting Long-Needed Makeover

While it was never topped with a highway like its San Francisco cousin, San Diego's Embarcadero has long been a car-dominated no-man's land of wasted opportunity along the city's stunning bay. No more! Earlier this year the city broke ground on a redevelopment of the area, including new pavilions, plazas, a 105-foot-wide esplanade, and bike and walking paths. The area will be planted with hundreds of new trees and set with new street furniture and decorative lighting. Phase one, encompassing 1.2 miles, should be done by next summer.  The project, guided by the North Embarcadero Vision Plan, is being paid for by the Port of San Diego and the city of San Diego, acting through the  Centre City Development Corporation.
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Wings Sprouting Again in San Diego

It looks like wings are hot in San Diego (and apparently LA, too). Recently we reported that Zaha Hadid was building a wing-like house in La Jolla, and now we learn via the San Diego Union-Tribune that the Midway aircraft carrier museum has proposed "Wings of Freedom," a 500-foot-tall  sculpture consisting of two wings (they've also been described as sails, a tribute to maritime activity on San Diego Bay) on the south end of the city's Navy Pier. The structures, designed by Tucker Sadler & Associates, would be made of titanium shaped around a steel frame. “If this image of us is half as successful as the Sydney Opera House is to Australia, it’ll be worth billions of dollars,” said local businessman and philanthropist Malin Burnham, who has advocated for the wings. Detractors of the plan say it would block views of the bay and be an eyesore for the area. “I’m not sure we have to put up another 500-foot towers to others’ egos,” said Don Wood, a member of the Navy Broadway Complex Coalition, which has fought several ideas for the city's waterfront.
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Firm News> Miller Hull Opens Office in San Diego

Seattle architecture firm Miller Hull, a  past winner of the AIA national Firm Award, may be best-known for their work in the Pacific Northwest, but they've also been active in San Diego for the last seven years. Now the firm is finally opening an office in the city, giving them a physical presence and simplifying things for their architects and for clients. They'll start out with five people in the office, including design partner Craig Curtis and managing partner Norman Strong, who will split their time between San Diego and Seattle. Miller Hull's projects underway in the city include the renovation of the San Ysidro Land Port of Entry, which is the busiest border crossing in the world; and the UC San Diego Structural and Nano Materials Engineering Building. They've also completed the mixed-use Wharf at Point Loma Marina and the Pier 32 Marina.
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The Latest From Gwynne Pugh

We recently ran into Gwynne Pugh, former principal at Pugh + Scarpa (now Brooks + Scarpa), who earlier this fall left his longtime job (22 years to be exact) to start his own firm, Gwynne Pugh Urban Studio. It seems that he's already quite busy working as an urban design consultant. Pugh, who sees himself as an intermediary between cities and developers, is consulting with agencies in the cities of San Diego, Carson, and Long Beach. He's also teaming up with Bridge Housing on an affordable housing project in Santa Monica and working with Coca Cola to review its sustainability scheme for its bottling plant in Downey. Pugh is also president of the planners' division of the  League of California Cities. "It's been a great opportunity for me to focus on some of these issues I care about," said Pugh, who right now is working with three employees, and plans to move to a new office in Playa Vista in the beginning of next year.
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Car Free In San Diego?

It seems that Times Square's pedestrian-friendly experiment is catching on.. According to The San Diego Union Tribune, The Plaza de Panama in San Diego's Balboa Park is proposing to go car-free with a $33 million plan by Mayor Jerry Sanders and Qualcomm co-founder Irwin Jacobs.  The proposal would remove 67 auto spaces in the park, and a 900-space parking structure will be built at the south of the park for the displaced cars.  If achieved, the new space opens up possibilities not only for strollers but for public artwork and new landscaping. The plan has its detractors, mostly because there is the possibility that the parking structure could impose a fee (parking in the park is currently free). A committee has been created to help raise the funds and the media has stated that there are donors already, who have history of funding park improvements. The new pedestrian friendly space is reflective of the 1915 San Diego Exposition, where the center was completely open to walkers. Officials are hoping to restore it for the centennial anniversary in 2015.