Posts tagged with "Roll & Hill":

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Specsheet>The best in minimalist lighting from Milan

Like London-based interdisciplinary office Studio Swine's Milan Design Week installation New Spring (above), simple statements in graphic metals make a big impact without overcrowding a room. Mobile Chandelier 13 Michael Anastassiades Building on his series Mobile Chandeliers 1–10, introduced in 2008, Michael Anastassiades crafted Mobile Chandelier 13 out of black-patinaed brass to further explore the curves, lines, and delicate forms for which he is known. Yanzi
 Neri & Hu for Artemide Playful white glass orbs and brushed-brass lines resemble birds perched on a wire in this matte-black brass light, which comes in suspension, floor, and table variations. Miro 3 
 Atelier de Troupe This square-framed light is handmade in L.A. and comes in unfinished or blackened brass (shown). It holds three glass shades, two round and one oval, and is hung by customizable cloth-wrapped wire. Krane Ladies & Gentlemen Studio + Vera & Kyte for Roll & Hill Informed by the functionality of a building crane, this mounted light can be easily raised or lowered: The cord slides through the arch, balanced by its counterweight. Krane is available in a large or small ceiling mount, or wall mount. Arca chandelier
 Philippe Malouin 
for Matter Made A swooping, minimal blackened-brass chandelier is an airy option for oversize lighting. The modular system adapts to myriad spaces, and LED bulbs in blown opal glass offer soft, even light.
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Roll & Hill lighting showroom, designed by architecture firm Husband Wife, opens in Soho

Brooklyn lighting company Roll & Hill is opening its first-ever showroom in Manhattan’s Soho district May 14. Together with architecture firm Husband Wife, with which the company previously partnered for its Euroluce stand in Milan, and designer Jason Miller, Roll & Hill created a space that reflected its boutique offerings. Founder Jason Miller established the company in 2010 to offer high-quality local craftsmanship (the factory is located in Sunset Park) to a mass audience—working with independent designers such as Lindsey Adelman, Fort Standard, Philippe Malouin, and Formafantasma. The showroom is meant to be a reflection of its luxury wares: “I think lighting often acts as a counterpoint to architecture. I have heard it described as ‘jewelry for the home,’ and I wanted to create an environment that would allow the lights to do just that,” said Miller.

To achieve this effect, the building was completely gutted and elegantly redone in white open spaces punctuated by simple fluted columns, oblong archways, delicate staircases, and gently curving walls. The 4,000-square-foot, four-story showroom opens with a first floor that functions like a traditional gallery (“Without the stuffiness,” Miller clarified), while the second floor is viewed as the “library floor” and the third floor “has a sexy ’70s vibe,” both with plush carpets and wood paneling, accompanied by exclusively designed furniture by Miller, Malouin, and Finn Juhl. “I was looking for a place…that felt intimate. I think it does exactly what I was hoping.”