Posts tagged with "Robert A.M. Stern":

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On View> 100 Years of Architecture Education at Yale

Any fan of architecture is familiar with the rich history of the Yale School of Architecture (YSoA). If they aren't they are likely familiar with some of the projects that have resulted from the school's influential concrete halls. From Paul Rudolph's heroic brutalism to Robert Venturi and Denise Scott Brown's "Learning From" series—and the productive friction between the two—the school has had an impact on much of the history of 20th and 21st century century architecture. A new exhibition, “Pedagogy and Place," organized by YSoA dean Robert A.M. Stern and curator (and AN contributor) Jimmy Stamp with Alfie Koetter, presents a range of student work that tracks the history of Yale architecture, and in parallel, the history of American architecture alongside political change in the U.S. The show is located in the YSoA Gallery in Rudolph Hall and is free and open to the public. With the bush-hammered concrete walls enveloping visitors, the show unfolds as a series of eight "eras" in Yale's history, including its beginnings as the American Beaux-Arts, to the beginnings of Modernism, to the high-flying Heroics of Rudolph and company, to the radical experiments of John Johansen and Charles Moore. The material in the exhibition is all student work, labeled as such with student names and their professors credited as well. It reads like the old issues of Domus or Progressive Architecture, but with student work illustrating each period and line of thinking. Education and the academy plays a serious role in the pursuit of intellectual innovation in architecture, and Yale is one of the leaders. A related publication, “Pedagogy and Place: 100 Years of Architecture Education at Yale,” will be published in April 2016 by Yale Press. A symposium, “Learning/Doing/Thinking: Educating Architects,” will be held April 14–16 in New Haven. All of this coincides with the changing of the guard as Stern moves on and Deborah Berke, architect and founder of the New York-based design firm Deborah Berke Partners, assumes deanship July 1. Pedagogy and Place YSoA Gallery in Rudolph Hall 180 York Street Monday–Friday 9 a.m.–5 p.m., Saturday 10 a.m.–5 p.m.

                    
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See iconic architecture (for free!) at Open House New York Weekend

This weekend, 256 public and privately-owned sites across New York City will open their doors to thousands of architecture and history nerds for the 13th annual Open House New York (OHNY) Weekend. All sites are free to visit, though some require registration in advance. Gregory Wessner, executive director of OHNY, said the event is an "opportunity to get an audience to look at the city through different disciplinary lenses." This year, 1,200 volunteers will staff 256 sites. Wessner explained the selection criteria: sites are evaluated for their architectural, cultural, and historical significance; location; proximity to public transportation; period, style, and typology. Last year, OHNY Weekend attracted approximately 75,000 visitors over two days. 80 percent of those visitors were New Yorkers. Given the depth and breadth of the offerings, it's impossible to privilege one site over another, though Wessner said he's particularly excited about City Hall. City Hall, he believes, "represents what's great about OHNY. It represents the seat of government, which most of us don't get to go into, and welcomes the public to go in and look around." New York's Beyer Blinder Belle renovated the palatial 1812 structure this year. A little-known architectural mecca is Bronx Community College. From 1959–1970, New York University (then owner of the campus) commissioned Marcel Breuer to design four buildings. DOCOMOMO New York/Tri-State will lead tours of Breuer's buildings on Saturday and Sunday. Also on campus: the Beaux-Arts Gould Memorial Library and Hall of Fame (Stanford White, 1900) and North Hall and Library (Robert A.M. Stern, 2012). Though the weekend is the group's biggest event, OHNY operates throughout the year, organizing tours and talks to encourage dialogue around major issues affecting the city's built environment. The Final Mile is a yearlong exploration of the "challenges and choices for an equitable and resilient food system" in New York. Food manufacturing, Wessner stated, is the fastest growing manufacturing sector in the city, and drives real estate development (think Smorgasburg and Chelsea Market). Tomorrow, Friday, OHNY is leading tours of food manufacturing facilities as a lead-up to the weekend. Visitors should check the OHNY Weekend for updates ahead of their trip. See the gallery below for more images of featured sites.
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There’s a Michael Graves–designed apartment hidden in the Brooklyn Museum

Fun fact: there's a set of fully furnished rooms, designed by Michael Graves, that lives in storage at the Brooklyn Museum. Built between 1979 and 1981 for Susan and John Reinhold, the suite within their duplex at 101 Central Park West was donated to the museum when the couple divorced in 1986. Preserved in situ, the rooms are a rare surviving example of interior postmodern architecture. The couple, prominent members of the art world, asked Graves to turn a bedroom into a playroom for the couple's daughter, and remodel the guest suite into a library. Prior to Graves, however, the Reinholds gave their apartment star treatment: the first renovation was done by Robert A.M. Stern and John Hagmann in 1971.  Stern and Hagmann removed walls, ceilings, and thresholds in the unit to create a smooth, all white interior. Graves' renovation complemented the previous one with a pale blue, yellow, brown, and white palette. The library was modeled on a basilica, the central nave flanked by aisles of bookcases. Except for one, the bookcases are styled into pared-down columns. The top of each column conceals a light fixture, adding a soft glow that is complemented by the coffered ceiling, its topmost section painted blue. Graves placed a Corbusier-inspired mural of his own design in the space where an alter would have been. The materials throughout were ordinary plywood and sheetrock. In the bedroom, the bookcase/pilasters theme from the library carries over. Segmented columns separate lightly delineate the space while still maintaining an open flow. The Reinhold's daughter praised the design overall, but complained that the shelves were not wide enough for her records and books.  See the gallery below for more images of Graves' suite.
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Archtober Building of the Day 3> North Hall and Library, Bronx Community College

Archtober Building of the Day #3 North Hall and Library, Bronx Community College Robert A.M. Stern Architects Alex Lamis, FAIA, and Dennis Sagiev met a windblown gaggle of enthusiasts on the educational plateau of the Bronx: the former University Heights campus of NYU. Now Bronx Community College, it is a repository of ambitious plans. The first was the Jeffersonian campus plan of 1892 by Stanford White with its iconic Gould Memorial Library (1900) framed by the venerable Hall of Fame (1912). Marcel Breuer made his Modernist marks on the hilltop in 1956 and on into the 1960s. At North Hall it’s all about respect. The gang at Robert A. M. Stern Architects went straight to fitting in alongside the White masterpieces. The library itself is sturdily traditional in its up-to-the-minute technology hub – the information commons is awash with stand-up computer desks with scrolls. “A pent-up need,” according to librarian Theresa McManus, resulted in a project that “sends a message to the students.” There’s new building technology in the panel precast brick construction. And RAMSA designed an ironic postmodern histri-ionic column. Lamis explained that the fake rivets were part of the “artistic representation” of the structural steel. Historically, Lamis noted, the library is a “center for the retention of culture in its place.” Tomorrow’s excursion is to the Queens Botanic Garden.
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Bjarke Ingels and James Corner give Philadelphia’s 214-year-old Navy Yard a boost into the 21st century

Bjarke Ingels is giving Philadelphia's antique Navy Yard a jolt into the 21st century. BIG teamed up with James Corner Field Operations to bring a $35 million office building, called 1200 Intrepid, featuring double curves designed to mirror the contours of Corner's surrounding landscape. "Our design for 1200 Intrepid has been shaped by the encounter between Robert Stern’s urban master plan of rectangular city blocks and James Corner’s iconic circular park,” Ingels said in a statement. “The ‘shock wave’ of the public space spreads like rings in the water invading the footprint of our building to create a generous urban canopy at the entrance.” The 94,000-square-foot, four-story structure just broke ground in the Navy Yard. It stands adjacent to the Central Green, a park that boasts circular plots occupied by a variety of trees and plants, pedestrian pathways, and a hammock grove. In addition, it offers a fitness station, a table tennis area, and a running track that 1200 Intrepid's design responds to. The park and building are part of Pennsylvania’s plan to transform this segment of South Philly from an industrialized business campus to a multi-functional industrial space that will accommodate 11,000 employees working for companies ranging from the pharmaceutical industry to Urban Outfitters. The plan to revitalize the Naval Yard began in 2004 when the state commissioned Michael van Valkenburgh Associates, Robert A.M. Stern, and numerous experts to create a master plan that “includes environmentally friendly workplaces, notable architecture, industrial development, great public spaces, waterfront amenities, improved mass transit, and residential development,” according to the Navy Yard website. Ingels’ building will help reach the Yard’s estimated goal of supporting up to $3 billion in private investments, 13.5 million square feet of development, and 30,000 people. Although 1200 Intrepid has yet to secure tenants, according to the Philadelphia Business Journal, it is set to open its doors in 2016. The project is being developed by Pennsylvania-based Liberty Property Trust and Synterra Partners.
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Drive-By Design: A billboard by Zaha Hadid proposed for London

09-zaha-billboard-london International outdoor advertising and street furnishings firm JCDecaux and Zaha Hadid Architects have proposed a new billboard design for a busy London intersection. The Paris-based JCDecaux has quite the history of collaborating with high-profile architects and designers—Peter Eisenman, Robert Stern, Gae Aulenti, Philippe Starck, and Lord Norman Foster among them. 06-zaha-billboard-london From an improbable aerial view, the project looks promising. But on the ground, its aesthetic traction is questionable. The design is a retread, both in its resemblance to defective tires and with regard to Hadid's canon of mobius-like creations. The pedestrian experience—no pun intended—doesn't look to be enhanced, either, even though the proposed structure is narrower than the existing advertising kiosk. 07-zaha-billboard-london Could a case be made that such eye-catching, animated structures might contribute to distracted driving? The answer to that question depends on who you ask. The U.S. Department of Transportation conducted a study that concluded digital billboards are no more distracting than stationary signage. But an investigation by the Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute came to a very different finding, which led to the removal of all such advertisements.
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Robert A.M. Stern stepping toward stepping down at Yale

Robert A.M. Stern has indicated he will step down as dean of the Yale School of Architecture in Spring 2016, according to the Yale Daily News. During his tenure, Stern has reinvigorated the School, restored its home, expanded its faculty, and brought through a roster of prominent guest critics from around the world. Stern has taken an eclectic view of architecture, bringing in practitioners of various styles and pedagogical viewpoints, and reinvigorated the study of architectural history with a new Ph.D. program. As dean, he has also helped guide the University's building program, including the restoration of Louis Kahn's Yale Art Gallery with an expansion by Ennead, a new home for the School of Management by Foster + Partners, and a highly sustainable building for the School of Forestry by Hopkins Architects, among many other projects. He also helped select the late Charles Gwathmey to lead the restoration of Paul Rudolph's Art + Architecture building, which was applauded, though Gwathmey's addition for the History of Art Department proved controversial. His own firm—which has expanded exponentially in during his 16 years as dean—is designing two new residential colleges (Oxbridge-style dorms), which will allow the undergraduate population to expand for the first time in decades. Though located in provincial New Haven, Connecticut, Stern has made the school a social and cultural hub, hosting and organizing ambitions exhibitions and symposia, always followed by martini-fueled receptions and private dinners in his stylish apartment. Students are encouraged to mingle with faculty and visiting guests—indeed developing the social aspects of the school, as training for the profession, has been one of the hallmarks of his deanship. Alternately imposing and highly personal, Stern's personality marks each event, and has left an indelible mark on the school.
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On Second Try, Robert Stern’s Proposal for Philly’s American Revolution Museum Approved

Weeks after the Philly Art Commission slammed Robert Stern’s proposal for the Museum for the American Revolution, he’s back with a new design. And good news for the starchitect—the commission likes it. They really, really like it. The Philadelphia Inquirer reported that the new plan was unanimously approved and building permits should be issued in the next few months. Unsurprisingly, Stern's altered design does not include the features, which the Commission called “Disneyesque.” “Architects replaced a cupola with a less-glaring, square-edged element lower on the building; reworked the front entrance on Third; and added to the facade on Chestnut a large lobby window and full-size bas-relief replica along the sidewalk of John Trumbull's famous painting hanging in the Capitol Rotunda, The Signing of the Declaration of Independence,” reported the paper.
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Philly Art Commission Pans Stern’s Revolution Museum Design as “Disneyesque”

Philadelphia might be the City of Brotherly Love, but it’s not showing any affection for Robert A.M. Stern these days. According to Philly.com, the city’s Art Commission is  “deeply dissatisfied” with the architect’s proposal for the new Museum of the American Revolution. The newspaper's critic, Inga Saffron, reported that “the commission asked the architects to remove a Disneyesque cupola, add eye-level windows on Chestnut Street, and reconsider the building's composition.” It’s not quite the shot heard around the world, but, “Disneyesque cupola!?” The Philly Art Commission pulls no punches. This dramatic turn of events may have been ugly, but it’s not likely to stop the entire $150 million project from moving forward. The Commission has reportedly "formed a special committee to work with the museum” and construction could start as soon as this summer. So despite the setback, Mr. Stern will likely be able to add another Philadelphia-based project to his portfolio. Ain’t no stopping him now.
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Penn-ultimate? Never! Norman Foster’s Superstitious Plans for Philly

In life, by all accounts, William Penn, founder of the Province of Pennsylvania, was a good man. In death, however, this portly, English-born idealist has turned nasty—if the good sports fans of Philadelphia are to be believed. But Norman Foster has a plan to appease the spirits. The trouble all started when a Bronze statue of Penn was placed atop the tower of Philadelphia’s Second Empire–style city hall, which, upon its completion in 1901, was the tallest structure in town. It maintained that status, and Penn his supremacy, until the erection of One Liberty Place in 1987, which stood some 400 feet taller. As soon as Penn’s perch was eclipsed, Philadelphia was plunged into a 25-year drought during which none of the city’s professional sports franchises won a championship. Many began to speculate that the founding father had cursed his progeny. To appease the peeved spirit, upon the completion of the even taller, Robert A.M. Stern–designed Comcast Center in 2007, a miniature statue of the great man was placed atop the building’s highest beam. A year later, the Phillies won the World Series. Now, to keep old Penn happy, the statue will be moved to the top of an even taller tower designed by Foster + Partners, which is currently under construction.
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Product> 2013 Architect’s Holiday Gift Guide

As architects, we know you're overworked and probably underpaid, and we're guessing you haven't had time to draft your holiday wish list quite yet. But don't despair. AN has compiled a list of high-design, unique gift ideas for you and your colleagues, friends, and family members with good taste, most of which are also attainable for budget-conscious buyers. Pianta Karryon Taski Tote drawings and plans in a bespoke leather carrying case. The product's name comes from the Italian word for floor plan, and an phonetic take on the words "carry on." With an adjustable Velcro closure, it can carry rolls of plans from 3 1/2- to 11-inches in diameter. Luxe Carafe Niche Modern  Glass blowers form the smooth curves of this sleek water carafe and drinking glass. At 9 1/2 inches in height, in comes a variety of colors, in addition to clear. A Field Guide to American Houses: The Definitive Guide to Identifying and Understanding America's Domestic Architecture Virginia and Lee Mcalester For the know-it-all on your list, provide some ammunition for their holiday cocktail party conversation arsenal. The second edition is a fully expanded, comprehensive expansion to the original 1984 release with more than 1,600 detailed photographs and line illustrations. S20-L2 Baton Olight For job site traipsing or natural disaster preparedness, this is the perfect gift for the adventurer on your list. Four brightness levels and a strobe setting assure safety assistance across multiple levels and a strong magnet at the back assumes a stationary, spotlight function. An affixed clip also coordinates nicely with pocket protectors. Mirage Shelving Ladies & Gentleman Studio Who isn't up for a good game of smoke and mirrors? Show your sense of humor by giving the look of grandeur at just 30 inches in height. Mirage Hex Corner is wall mounted with a walnut-trimmed cleat, to achieve a seamless, kaleidoscopic effect. Soccket Uncharted Play Give the gift of social change when you buy Soccket, a soccer ball that stores the kinetic of energy of play to power small electronic devices. Each purchase also gives a child the opportunity to join a SOCCKET Team for access to renewable SOCCKET power and an educational curriculum. Beyond the Bridge Think Fabricate Created from an 1879-lithographic print of "balloon view" bridges from Currier and Ives, this series suits the traditionalist, engineer, or Brooklynite on your list. The series include one plate each of the Brooklyn Bridge, Brooklyn Heights, Governor’s Island, and the Brooklyn Navy Yard with Wallabout Bay in the foreground. Charley Harper: An Illustrated Life Todd Oldham If you're looking for vibrant graphics, look no further than Todd Oldham's compilation of Charley Harper's expansive illustrating career. With an intimate interview forward, you'll see these iconic images from your childhood textbooks in a whole new light: Charley Harper was an early supporter of women in the workplace and an avid conservationist. Available in both hard cover and paper back editions. Line/09 Myers Collective For the design-minded women on your list, how about a handcrafted necklace? LA-based architect Jenny Myers designed this 20-inch piece with silk thread that supports brass tubes in unique geometric formations, fastened with a gold clasp and hardware. Sake Set Deborah Ehrlich Collection This sake set, hand-blown from Swedish crystal, would meet any Japanophile's discerning standards. The slim decanter measures 8 1/2 inches in height and 2 inches in diameter, and each cup is a dainty 1 1/3- by 2-inches. AeroPress Aerobie Go ahead and feed the addiction: Coffeeholic and AN managing editor Aaron Seward says its the best he's ever had. Each order comes with the full kit of parts and a supply of specially shaped filters that will keep your caffeine levels sky high for a full year. For an accompanying premium roast, we recommend Gimme!. Vieni via con me Ring Alessi An extension of Trimarchi's La Stanza dello Scirocco collection includes a geometric cocktail ring that measures just under 2 inches. It's stainless steel material is suitable for those on your list with sensitive skin. Paradise Planned: The Garden Suburb and the Modern City by Robert A.M. Stern, David Fishman, and Jacob Tilove Monacelli Press Sure to please any urbanist, this 1,072-page tome contains the definitive history of the garden suburb.  The book chronicles its start in England during the late 18th century and the effects of industrialization and transportation across many cities in the U.S. Bol Sein Sevres For the person who has a tinge of an Oedipal complex or just a liberal sense of humor, the Bol Sein speaks to carnal urges in a porcelain medium. Allegedly, the mold was formed from the bosom of Marie Antoinette during the 18th century for her King and husband.
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Stalled Residential Tower in Lower Manhattan to Rise Next to Woolworth Building

A giant residential skyscraper is slated to join Manhattan’s skyline— rising more than 130 feet above its neighbor, the Woolworth Building.  Developer Silverstein Properties announced today that $950 million in funding has been secured to move forward with the construction of the Robert A.M. Stern Architects-designed tower at 30 Park Place in Lower Manhattan. This massive building will climb up to 82-stories—making it the tallest residential tower in Downtown Manhattan according to a recent statement—and will include a 185-room Four Seasons hotel, 157 Four Seasons luxury residences, and a public plaza. Yabu Pushelberg, the design firm behind a slew of W and Four Season Hotels, will design the interiors for this project. Silverstein Properties anticipates that the they will break ground by Fall 2013 and complete the 926-feet tower by 2016.