Posts tagged with "Restaurants":

EOM’s Vespertine combines sculptural architecture with experimental food

Vespertine 3599 Hayden Avenue Culver City, California Tel: 323-320-4023

Eric Owen Moss Architects (EOM) recently completed work on Vespertine, a new 5,500-square-foot structure housing a boutique restaurant helmed by chef Jordan Kahn that was developed hand-in-hand with EOM principal Eric Owen Moss and other artists as a convergent experience joining food, architecture, and music. The gridded tower is made up of an undulating stack of powder-coated steel plates infilled with panes of glass and rises 50 feet housing two interior levels and a mezzanine. A clumpy garden filled with concrete benches and horsetail sits beside the tower, filling out a footprint identical to that of the monolith. When diners arrive, drinks are served in the horsetail garden, where a wedge-shaped concrete-block storage room also houses a bar. The glass-clad ground floor of the building is left unadorned, occupied only by a sculptural table suspended from the ceiling that wraps around the 38-by-38-foot space. An elevator housed in the building’s core takes guests to the second-floor kitchen, an all black arrangement of parallel worktables and induction burners where black-clad cooks use Olfa knives to dice vegetables and turn them into various pastes, gels, and foams. After conferring with the chef, diners make it to the roof terrace above, where custom bean bag chairs and tables built from ready-made woodworking benches fill out the space. Sometime during the 21-course meal, diners flow down into the building’s mezzanine level, where banquettes and movable acrylic tables outfit a proper dining room. Ceiling spotlights and etched tabletops work in tandem to refract light through and around the food. At the end of the meal, diners descend back onto the ground floor, where the sculptural table offers a parting gift containing scents inspired by the night’s meal.

A trippy throwback bar with 60’s vibes opens in Chelsea

The Woodstock 446 W 14th St, New York Tel: 212-633-2000 Designer: Damaris Cozza Located on 14th street in Manhattan under the High Line, The Woodstock is a recently opened 1960s-themed restaurant and bar designed by set designer Damaris Cozza that features a vivid, retro design and specializes in cocktails and Neapolitan-style pizza. The 4,000-square-foot establishment is divided into two zones: a larger dining area and a smaller-scale lounge, both painted in bright colors. Communal tables fashioned out of repurposed bowling lanes and marble-topped tables occupy the larger hall, with seating comprised of a motley mix of mid-century furniture. The lounge, clad in wood paneling, has two coffee tables surrounded by plush leather and canvas couches. To cement the lounge’s homey personality, lava lamps, antique lamps, and even a stuffed rabbit are scattered across the space. Emphasizing the restaurant’s 1960s vibes are a series of period posters and paintings, ranging from President Kennedy’s campaign ads to psychedelic prints. Of particular note, The Woodstock boasts a rotating set of twenty-four Salvador Dali artworks from owners David Sitt and James Morrissey’s personal collections, as well as a fuchsia felt pool table.

Snøhetta unveils subdued French Laundry expansion

Snøhetta, celebrity chef Thomas Keller, and architecture firm Envelope A+D have completed work on a 4,430-square-foot renovation and expansion of the famed French Laundry restaurant in Yountville, California. The understated overhaul delivers a new kitchen annex that boosts the restaurant’s support functions by providing new butchery, produce breakdown, and wine storage spaces. The new expanded configuration will help Keller and his team “innovate their craft and service,” according to a press release. The new pitched-roof kitchen annex is tucked behind the existing restaurant cottage and is designed specifically to harken to utilitarian agrarian structures that dot Napa Valley. The gabled building is wrapped in charred wood siding along one side, with the facades facing a new interior terrace wrapped in black curtain wall glass. For these walls, the architects created a special curve-based frit pattern that is inspired by the ways in which members of the kitchen staff move while they work. This pattern is laid out along the lower sections of each of these facades, with transparent and opaque sections located above. The rustic-but-sleek annex is designed with no overhangs and a roof that meets flush with its supporting wall. The structure is sited so that it is among the first things patrons see as they enter the restaurant grounds, which have been reworked into a series of discrete courtyards in the scheme. The design team created a rusticated basalt stone wall marked with dramatic entry thresholds to wrap these newly-programmed garden spaces. Inside the renovated 2,000-square-foot kitchen, Snøhetta has installed a new wood-burning oven and rotisserie, while also expanding and rearranging the interior architecture of existing kitchen areas to include a greater amount of working space. The sun-lit kitchen is topped by two vaulted skylights that curve upward to meet the ceiling. The kitchen’s new bell-shaped ceiling conceals kitchen gadgetry and also enhances kitchen acoustics, according to the press release. Snøhetta also designed a pair of concave stainless steel work tables for the project that are located within the kitchen pass and are designed to allow people working at the table to stay out of the path of travel into and out of the kitchen. The renovated restaurant is open to the public, but if you want to see these new spaces yourself, it will have to wait—The restaurant is currently fully-booked through the end of May 2018.

Iconic postmodern Kentucky Fried Chicken restaurant heavily damaged after fire

An iconic postmodern Kentucky Fried Chicken (KFC) outlet in Los Angeles has been severely damaged after a fire yesterday afternoon. Located on 340 North Western Avenue, in Koreatown, the restaurant suffered burns to its roof and walls. Los Angeles Fire Department spokeswoman Margaret Stewart told San Fernando Valley Media that 40 firefighters took to the scene, dealing with the fire in just over 30 minutes. No injuries have been reported; however, an investigation into the cause of the fire is still underway. The KFC was formerly run by Jack Wilkee, who took on the franchise to make changes to the restaurant, which he operated for 25 years. "I challenged the notion that all KFC franchises should have the same standard design of fake mansard roofs (and) outsize Colonel Sanders bucket," Wilke told the L.A. Times in 1990. "Why not do something radically different for a change?" To make such a change, Wilke, an art collector, sought the expertise of local architect Elyse Grinstein, who he knew from his art circles. Grinstein's influence, exhibited in her charred work, comes from Frank Gehry, her former boss, and Michael Graves, who was Grinstein's student when she was a teaching assistant at the University of California, Los Angeles. Wilke enjoyed Gehry's overtones that carried through in Grinstein's architecture so much so that he let her have free reign with the KFC's design. "I turned the design over to her, and let her have her head," he said. As a result, Jeffrey Daniels, Grinstein's partner and colleague at the Culver City practice Grinstein/Daniels, produced the Koreatown icon that many know today. "Jack (Wilke) wanted to do an updated Googie KFC," Daniels said, "but we convinced him to take it one step further and reinterpret the 1950s diner style in a more sophisticated 1990s idiom," Daniels said, also speaking to the L.A. Times 27 years ago. The design may have been the first KFC to break the formal mold that had been a precedent for KFC's before, but it certainly was not the last.

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Also in California, the Palm Springs KFC dons a Googie aesthetic. Meanwhile, in Georgia, the Marietta "Big Chicken" (which became a KFC franchise in 1991) sports a 56-foot-tall steel chicken, complete with a moving beak. The much-loved roadside restaurant recently received $2 million makeover.

Chicago has become a testing ground for the next wave of restaurant design

We are living in the Golden Age of restaurants. According to the United States Department of Agriculture, Americans spend nearly half of their food budget eating at restaurants, rather than shopping at grocery stores. This fact stands in stark contrast to the greater trend in retail, which shows brick-and-mortar storefronts struggling against online competition and skyrocketing rent. Yet, success in the restaurant business is far from guaranteed. With more options for high quality food than ever before, restaurants new and old are rethinking their place in urban settings.

Though Chicago may be best known for deep-dish pizza and hotdogs, the food scene in the past decade has been defined more by several highly experimental restaurants such as the Michelin three-star micro-gastronomy restaurant Alinea. While such award-winning establishments have changed the culinary scene, it is the extreme flux of fast-casual eateries, such as Chipotle Mexican Grill and Freshii, that has saturated neighborhoods to the point of bursting.

Just as Chicago has been a testing ground for some of the world’s most unusual cooking techniques, it would seem the city is now becoming the site of an uncanny fast food resurgence. As McDonald’s moves its headquarters from its Dirk Lohan–designed modernist campus in Chicago’s Oak Brook suburb to downtown, other chains are also rethinking their spaces to appeal to the urban set. McDonald’s, Burger King, and Taco Bell all have redesigned or launched new restaurants specifically for urban settings. In particular, Taco Bell has launched a new line of storefronts that are hardly recognizable as the affordable “Mexican” chain.

With the first of its kind opening in Wicker Park, Chicago, the Taco Bell Cantina takes a step toward the fast-casual market and away from its drive-through and suburban-mall food court roots. Most noticeably, the Cantina doesn’t have a drive-through, or even a parking lot. Situated in a small storefront—which once housed a short-lived high-end sex toy shop—the fast food giant takes advantage of the heavily pedestrian-trafficked Milwaukee Avenue retail district. Once pocked with numerous vacant storefronts, the street is now filling with local and national chains looking to cash in on the popularity of the walkable neighborhood.

As such, this Taco Bell is specifically designed for pedestrians. This carries into the interior with nonslip tile floors that guard against the slush and snow of Chicago winters. The dining area is somewhere between a fast-casual restaurant, an internet cafe, and a sports bar. Yes, a sports bar. When the Cantina opened, most stories revolved around the fact that this is the first Taco Bell to serve alcohol. Hard liquor can be mixed with Taco Bell’s proprietary Mountain Dew flavors, and beer is served in bottles. Large flat-screen TVs along one wall play sports, news, and, late at night (it is open 24 hours), the Syfy channel. During the day, it is not uncommon to see people sitting at the highly finished plywood furniture working on laptops. Airport terminals should take note of the number of outlets at this Taco Bell. With at least one for every seat, it is ironically more convenient to work there than at the trendy coffee shop down the street. All of this is part of a carefully planned shift by Yum! Brands, Inc., Taco Bell’s parent company. Since the opening of the Wicker Park Cantina in late 2015, 11 other “urban inline stores” have opened around the country. Along with the Cantina, Taco Bell has opened four other models in California, ostensibly referencing their specific locations. Those models have names like Heritage, Modern Explorer, California Sol, and Urban Edge. Of the 2,500 more Taco Bell locations Yum! plans to open around the world in the next five years, at least 300 of them are planned to be the urban iterations.

Another major brand that believes Chicago may be a perfect pilot site is the coffee giant Starbucks. After a major remodel of the tiny Wicker Park Starbucks, the space was rebranded as a higher-end offering that the Seattle-based company is calling Starbucks Reserve. Reserve locations serve small batch specialty coffees, and the design of the space has been rethought. Following a larger trend in retail, companies are looking to provide more differentiated environments, rather than the repetitious brand enforcing model companies like Starbucks are known for. Finer finishes, graphic and object references to the coffee harvesting process, and LEED compliant construction methods all add to this new “experience.” Doubling down in the windy city, Starbucks will also open its largest retail space to date downtown along Michigan Avenue. The third of its kind, the Starbucks Reserve Roastery will be a four-story, 43,000-square-foot coffee palace. Along with roasting the brand’s special Reserve coffees, the new space will include cafes and rooftop terraces.

While fast-casual chains continue to grow, that growth has begun to show signs of slowing in the past few years. The casual dining market on the other hand, typified by restaurants such as Applebee’s and TGI Fridays, has not only slowed to a stop—it has begun to lose ground. Analysts are now saying millennials, in particular, are just not interested in the chains that were so popular in the 1990s and early 2000s. With large numbers of twenty- and thirty-somethings moving to urban centers and preferring fast, generally healthier food, the restaurant industry is rushing to figure out how to keep up.

While Michelin-starred restaurants concoct fantastic dishes in spaces often difficult to find, let alone get reservations to, and fast casual brands continue to pump out quinoa wraps, a handful of large brands are trying to figure out what it means to have an urban presence. Rather than importing suburban drive-throughs, they’re mimicking urban coffee joints and neighborhood bars. Chicago, with its seemingly insatiable appetite for new and interesting restaurants, also seems to have room for some familiar faces that are willing to cater to its particular taste.

Philippe Starck designs a surreal nautical interior for Miami’s Bazaar Mar

While seafood might be de rigueur in the culinary scene of Miami, few local restaurants can lay claim to the unique, boldly crafted environment found at Bazaar Mar, the newest eatery in the SLS Brickell tower. The ambitious interior design by Philippe Starck and innovative cuisine by chef José Andrés marks the team’s fourth collaboration under the Bazaar name, an offering from hospitality developer SLS Hotels. The company, which owns similar real estate ventures in Beverly Hills, South Beach, and Las Vegas, recently completed the SLS Brickell, one of many new high-rises sprouting up downtown and in the Brickell neighborhood.

SLS enlisted the distinctive architectural skills of Miami-headquartered Arquitectonica to design the tower, which also houses over 450 condominiums and a 132-key hotel. Towers like SLS Brickell are changing the Miami skyline while also creating a rich landscape for projects like Bazaar Mar to serve the burgeoning resident and tourist populations.

When it comes to the food, however, SLS entrusted Spanish-born Andrés—a James Beard Award winner and pioneer of molecular gastronomy—to be the charismatic public face of Bazaar Mar. His vision for the menu is an attractive mix of disparate textures, aromas, and aesthetics. This spirit of inventiveness translates seamlessly into Starck’s scheme for the interior design, which equals Andrés penchant for theatrics and hyperbole. Starck crafted a nautical fantasy complete with mythical sea beasts, picturesque coastal vignettes, and a distinctive white-and-navy color palette.

The 7,200-square-foot Bazaar Mar is composed of two dining rooms and a raw bar materially connected by more than 6,000 hand-painted tiles featuring the drawings of artist Sergio Mora and manufactured in Spain by Cerámica Artística San Ginés. The azulejo tilework, painted in a Delft Blue pastiche typical of 16th-century Dutch pottery, completely covers the walls and ceiling. The murals are ornamented with gilded crustaceans and cabaret-style mermaids that dissolve otherwise-solid walls into surrealist other worlds. Likenesses of people involved in the project, including Chef Andrés, appear throughout the murals. The furnishings include smooth marble-topped tables, upholstered love seats, and stark white wooden chairs, creating an evocative atmosphere from which the maritime narrative emerges.

The bright dining room contrasts with a offset cocktail bar finished in black and gold tiles of the same stylized motif. The total effect of Starck’s design reflects both its seaside locale and the rapidly evolving Miami art and architecture scene.

SsD designs luminous, open interiors for Boston locations of Clover Food Lab

Cambridge, Massachusetts–based vegetarian fast food chain, Clover Food Lab, opened two new Boston locations last July by architecture firm SsD. The design of the locations, Boston Financial District and Longwood Medical and Academic Area, uses boundaries and light to emphasize Clover’s mission to promote transparency, simplicity, and community in the food industry.

“The boundary between ‘kitchen’ and the ‘customer’ is dissolved, allowing visual communication between the spaces while reflecting and multiplying light,” said architect Jinhee Park on the firm’s website. The space is open and bright, with simple finishes and bold signage, aiding in the layout’s legibility for customers.

Light fixtures are designed as art pieces, fulfilling their practical purpose while adding visual interest. A large wooden table, milled from a log, snakes through the space to add a warm natural touch to the minimalist design and provide an opportunity for communal dining experiences.

The new Financial District location is considered the brand’s Boston flagship location, able to seat 88 customers in the 2,300-square-foot space, plenty of room for the lunch rush.

Clover Food Lab 360 Longwood Avenue 160 Federal Street, Boston Architect: SsD

Austin’s Torchy’s Tacos flagship location pays tribute to nostalgic diner

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Torchy’s Tacos' new flagship location is situated on the former site of Austin-based Fran’s Hamburgers who symbolized nostalgia for the archetypal Texas drive-in diner. The structure’s iconic red “X” and “Y” shaped columns pay tribute to Fran's which also featured a modernist red steel perimeter structure. 
  • Facade Manufacturer The Salinas Group (steel fabrication); Binswanger Glass (storefront); Empire Roofing (standing seam); Villa Lagoon Tile & Cement Tile Shop (encaustic concrete tile)
  • Architects Chioco Design
  • Facade Installer The Salinas Group (steel construction); Alamo Tile (reflectors & encaustic concrete tile); Binswanger Glass (storefront); Empire Roofing (standing seam)
  • Facade Consultants n/a
  • Location Austin, TX
  • Date of Completion 2016
  • System Steel frame with storefront glazing
  • Products Binswanger Commercial Glass Storefront, custom fabricated steel structure, standing seam roofing
Led by architecture firm Chioco Design, the project integrates structural, electrical, HVAC, and daylighting systems into an extruded roof profile that extends beyond the facade to establish a large outdoor dining area. The architects say this helped to connect inside with outside: “The bright red columns support a crenelated roof profile extruded through the entire building, seamlessly connecting inside to out, and allowing for the addition of numerous north-facing skylights which provide an abundance of consistent natural light.” The roof is clad in a standing seam metal that folds down the side elevation and alternates between two coated finishes. This subtly reinforces a striped color scheme that extends to the interior of the restaurant by means of red tinted glazing and carefully positioned aluminum storefront mullions. Chioco Design said the project prioritized material quality: “We typically like to choose durable materials that give us an opportunity to experiment with texture, pattern, and color. We are big fans of concrete, steel, and wood and look to use these materials in various forms. You can sense their weight and timeless qualities.” This emphasis on materiality might best be seen on the west elevation which is covered in red road reflectors to produce a dazzling effect. The unique material “emphasizes the eclectic character of the neighborhood,” according to Chioco Design, who had previously worked with the restaurant chain to develop a set of dynamic material palettes for renovations to other locations. Also of note are the installation of encaustic cement tiles, offering unlimited pattern and color options, thoughtfully used on both interior and exterior surfaces to delineate entry and queuing areas. The building is located along Austin's South Congress shopping and cultural district and is open for business. Wondering what's the best thing to order at Torchy's? The architects recommend not passing up on the queso and green chile pork tacos!

Philippe Starck crafts nautical dream world for new Miami restaurant

This article appears in The Architect’s Newspaper’s April 2017 issue, which takes a deep dive into Florida to coincide with the upcoming AIA Conference on Architecture in Orlando (April 27 to 29). We’re publishing the issue online as the Conference approaches—click here to see the latest articles to be uploaded.

Chef José Andrés, James Beard Award winner and pioneer of molecular gastronomy, will lead the culinary team of Bazaar Mar, a new 7,200-square-foot restaurant just south of the Miami River in Arquitectonica’s newly built SLS Brickell tower. Designer Philippe Starck crafted a nautical dream world complete with mythical sea beasts, picturesque coastal vignettes, and a characteristic white and navy color palette.

The main space is composed of two dining rooms and a raw bar materially connected with over 6,000 hand-painted tiles featuring the drawings of artist Sergio Mora and manufactured in Spain by Cerámica Artística San Ginés. The tiles completely cover the walls and ceiling, painted in a Delft Blue pastiche that is typical of 16th-century Dutch pottery. The murals are ornamented with gilded crustaceans and cabaret-style mermaids that dissolve the otherwise solid walls into surrealist other worlds. Likenesses of people involved in the project appear throughout the murals including Chef Andrés. The furnishings are varied, including smooth marble-topped tables, upholstered love seats, and stark white wooden chairs, creating a visually heterogeneous atmosphere against which the maritime fantasy emerges.

The bright dining room is contrasted with a detached cocktail bar finished in black and gold tiles of the same stylized motif. The total effect of Starck’s design fittingly underscores Andrés seafood-centric menu and draws from the aura of Miami’s burgeoning art scene.

Bazaar Mar 1300 South Miami Avenue, Miami Tel: 305-615-5859 Designer: Phillipe Starck

150-year-old New York bar finds a new home in Austin, Texas

The 150-year-old Cedar Tavern bar in New York City once hosted luminaries such as Jackson Pollack, Willem De Kooning, Bob Dylan, and Jimi Hendrix in Greenwich Village. Now that very same bar lives on at Eberly, South Austin’s new restaurant. When the Cedar Tavern closed in 2006, Eberly partners John Scott and Eddy Patterson bought the nearly 12-foot-tall and 40-foot-long mahogany bar, took some photographs of it, and transferred it in hundred of pieces to a storage unit back in Austin. Then, they set about finding an appropriate home for their haul, landing on a former 15,000-square-foot print shop on South Lamar Boulevard. ICON Design + Build worked with Clayton & Little Architects and interior designer Mickie Spencer to incorporate the Cedar Tavern Bar into a series of spaces including a dining room, coffee shop, and 4,000-square-foot rooftop patio. ICON’s Jonas Durfor, a master carpenter, reconstructed the bar. Reused materials permeate the space, whose prefabricated construction allowed for design interventions without compromising the original components—vintage cotton gin windows were interspersed throughout the interior spaces to allow light in, while the original building’s concrete floor tiles were reused in the patio. Despite a design inspired by an eclectic mix of art nouveau, Victorian, midcentury modern, and British greenhouses from the 1800s, the space is tied together with its color scheme: blues, greens, brass, and mahogany. Each room is coordinated to allow patrons to spend their entire day at the Eberly, from coffee in the study, to drinks on the bar or in the patio, to a meal in the dining room.

Eberly 615 South Lamar Boulevard Austin, Texas Tel: 512-916-9000 Architect: ICON Design + Build and Clayton & Little Architects

Traditional masonry vaulting inspired the sculptural ceiling of this L.A. eatery

Amazebowls, a casual health food chain that began as a food truck, recently opened its first brick-and-mortar storefront in Michael Maltzan Architecture’s (MMA) One Santa Fe building in Los Angeles.

The storefront space was designed by 64North, a Los Angeles–based architecture, branding, and product design firm with deep ties to the building: Cofounder and design director Wil Carson was a designer at MMA for a decade and worked on One Santa Fe. Carson described the project as an opportunity to productively engage with the recent iconic structure by designing an “animated element within the larger project, creating a modest yet dramatic experience at the southern terminus of One Santa Fe.”

For the 600-square-foot storefront, 64North drew inspiration from traditional architectural forms, namely masonry vaulting. Carson explained that the project “recalls the classic form of a series of domes, assembled here in a celebratory, contemporary way, as they are individually scaled and distorted, intersecting to create a non-uniform whole.” The designers filled the store with a few key elements, including a sculptural ceiling made of CNC-milled, high-density EPS foam that has been plastered over, a sinuous, maple wood panel accent wall, and a semi-circular stone counter lit by gold-painted Pablo Swell pendant lights. The lofted ceiling extends beyond the curtain wall glazing along Santa Fe Avenue to denote a small exterior seating area located beneath an extended overhang.

Amazebowls 300 S. Santa Fe Avenue, Los Angeles Tel: 310-384-2202 Architect: 64North

This article appears on HoverPin, a new app that lets you build personalized maps of geo-related online content based on your interests: architecture, food, culture, fitness, and more. Never miss The Architect’s Newspaper’s coverage of your city and discover new, exciting projects wherever you go! See our HoverPin layer here and download the app from the Apple Store.

Aidlin Darling Design balances raw and polished surfaces in SFMOMA’s In Situ restaurant

San Francisco–based Aidlin Darling Design (ADD) and three-starred Michelin chef Corey Lee have teamed up for In Situ, a new 150-seat restaurant located within the original Mario Botta–designed portion of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art that was recently expanded by Snøhetta.

The restaurant is designed as an alternate-dimension art museum, where “borrowed” dishes on loan from the kitchens of the world’s most renowned chefs make up the menu, meticulously recreated by Lee’s team. And so, ADD has rendered an intentionally spare interior made of mostly-found surfaces, with many of the existing, roughed-out textures of the extant space remaining—some polished, some raw. Other interior elements, inserted neatly into that rough, gray box, act as bespoke elements: a sculptural timber ceiling, custom-made tables hewn from raw logs, and delicate bar stools and lounge chairs. Site-specific artworks are also scattered around the restaurant, which is lit from one side by a large storefront window opening onto Third Street.

The space is divided into two dining areas. The first, a large, informal dining room, is populated by bar-top and communal tables, is capped by the sculptural timber ceiling. Its surface is made up of delicately jagged and parallel wooden boards and extends across both dining rooms, alternating between various degrees of geometric relief. Further into the space, the second, more formal dining room is made up of intimate seating areas.

In Situ 151 Third Street San Francisco, CA Tel: 415-941 6050 Designer: Aidlin Darling Design (ADD)

[In Situ also won our 2016 Best of Design Award for Interior > Retail/Hospitality. Click here to learn more!]

This article appears on HoverPin, a new app that lets you build personalized maps of geo-related online content based on your interests: architecture, food, culture, fitness, and more. Never miss The Architect's Newspaper's coverage of your city and discover new, exciting projects wherever you go! See our HoverPin layer here and download the app from the Apple Store.