Posts tagged with "repurposed design":

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Ice Cream Freezer Reinvented as Santa Fe Architecture Office

Santa Fe, New Mexico–based architecture firm WAMO Studio recently moved into a cool new office—a former walk-in ice cream freezer. The repurposed space, formerly used by Taos Cow Ice Cream to store frozen treats. The 550-square-foot freezer offers a sleek and industrial space with sheet metal walls and industrial-strength insulation. After a few adjustments, WAMO has transformed it from a frigid container to a viable workspace. Partner and architect, Vahid Mojarrab, described the space to the Santa Fe New Mexican as “a perfect fit” for the husband-and-wife architecture company, which specializes in energy-efficient and high-performance design. Mojarrab and his wife, Carol Ware, had been searching for office space for their joint venture since he split from his former architecture partnership earlier this year. When a friend from Taos Cow mentioned a vacant freezer for lease on the ice cream company’s property, WAMO Studio realized the conversion easily: cutting holes for three windows and a door, removing the freezer’s compressor, and adding a heat pump for temperature control. Mojarrab is excited to reveal that the unit is about 50 percent more energy efficient than a common office space because of the insulated sheet metal construction that served its original purpose. Finding a way to recycle current architecture while improving its energy efficiency is something he believes affects the inhabitants of a building as well as its proprietor. “[E]ventually, the tenant pays for it,” he told the New Mexican. “At the end of the year, your landlord comes to you and says, ‘Your utility bill is so high I have to raise your rent.’” The rest of the Taos Cow property, including two separate walk-in freezers, is still dedicated to ice cream storage. With the majority of the original structure, including the freezer door, intact, the office of WAMO Studio blends inconspicuously into its surroundings. WAMO Studio is dedicated to environmentally conscious and site sensitive architecture. They are currently focused on Passive House certified endeavors.
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Carry a Piece of the Minneapolis Metrodome Wherever You Go

What's sure to become the ultimate tailgating accessory for Minneapolis Vikings football fans this year has hit the market at the Minnesota State Fair. Thanks to Duluth Pack, makers of bags and tents, the collapsed roof of the Minneapolis Metrodome has been reborn as a duffel and shell bag, appropriately part of the "Domer" collection. The stadium's white fabric dome collapsed in 2010 under the weight of Minneapolis' plentiful snow, the fourth time such an event has occurred. The torn remnants of the roof were put up for sale and businessmen, Jim Cunningham and Tim O’Phelan, picked up the inner of two layers of the roof on a "total whim" for $4,000, according to the Duluth News Tribune. The roof's outer layer was sold to farmers to cover their fields and a small portion went to sports fans looking for a momento. After a few years in storage, the three-acre inner layer of the Teflon-coated fiberglass covering has been cleaned and sliced into panels for the limited edition bags. Cunningham and O'Phelan approached Duluth Pack realizing the material's rugged potential. "You can’t rip it. It’s waterproof. It’s kind of like the materials Duluth Pack uses," O'Phelan told the News Tribune. If you can't make it to the Minnesota State Fair, the bags are also offered for sale online at Duluth Pack's website. Bags range in price from $160 to nearly $500. Minneapolis is currently moving forward with plans for a dramatic new Vikings stadium designed by architecture firm HKS. AN recently sat down for a Q+A with the architect working on the project, Bryan Trubey. [H/T Ballpark Digest.]