Posts tagged with "Renovation":

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Trahan Architects will take on interior renovation of New Orleans' Superdome

The Mercedes-Benz Superdome in New Orleans has been slowly but surely getting the upgrade it deserves over the last decade-and-a-half since Hurricane Katrina. Considering the venue's 44-year history of hosting renowned sports teams, its brief stint as a vital emergency shelter, and its recent designation on the National Register of Historic Places, the 76,000-seat arena has lived a storied life. Structurally, the piece of mega-infrastructure by Curtis & Davis is stronger than ever, but the interior could use a contemporary facelift.  This week, Trahan Architects revealed initial renderings of what will be a $450 million renovation of the beloved Superdome, set to be completed ahead of the Super Bowl LVIII in 2024. Nola.com reported that the New Orleans-based firm, which has been working on the space's restoration and renovation since the 2005 hurricane, will take the historic building and bring it into the 21st century of athletic entertainment. The studio will reorganize and improve back-of-house elements like bringing a giant commercial kitchen into the facility while dually enhancing front-facing amenities for spectators.  The Superdome's modernist exterior will remain the same. Trahan Architects has already replaced the outer shell of the 9.7-acre, single-span roof as well as the 400,000-square-foot exterior metal skin of the building to make it look like the original architects' design. Using anodized aluminum panels, the studio upgraded the membrane so that it could be changed out piece-by-piece in the future in case of damage. Phase one of the new project, set to cost $100 million, will largely include behind-the-scenes work while phase two will totally transform the look and feel of the Superdome's interior.  Elaina Berkowitz, an architectural designer on the Trahan team, said that although the redesign has been challenging to maneuver, improving the game-day experience for fans, while also "preserving the beauty and meaning of this classic structure" is a big deal for the firm. "It's a beautiful and iconic structure and is a wonderful representation of the strength of this fabulous community." One of the biggest changes of the upcoming renovation will center around the removal of the 80,000-square-foot ramp system (each is 50-feet-wide) that takes up the majority of space on the sidelines. Trahan Architects will build out a new series of vertical atriums with zigzagging escalators on two corners of the stadium before dismantling the old ramps, allowing fans easier circulation upon entering the Superdome and a closer view of the field than ever before.  In addition, the design team will integrate a diverse array of experiences for spectators to tap into. Field-level boxes on the end zones will be embedded under the general seats, according to Nola, and standing-room-only areas will allow fans to explore the stadium instead of being confined to their ticketed seats throughout an event.  The project announcement comes days after the Louisiana Stadium and Exposition District (a.k.a. the Superdome Commission) voted to approve the multi-million dollar makeover. Construction on phase one will begin in mid-to-late January and will be further conducted around the Saints’ season schedule, as well as other major New Orleans events.
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Wolfgang Tschapeller suspends over 100,000 books in new Cornell library

Cornell University’s much-anticipated Mui Ho Fine Arts Library is finally open in Ithaca, New York. Set within a 27,000-square-foot industrial building from 1911, the $16.9 million reading and learning space boasts four levels of floating bookshelves holding over 100,000 volumes.  The project was envisioned by Austrian architect Wolfgang Tschapeller, head of his eponymous Vienna-based firm and a graduate of Cornell’s master’s in architecture program. Alongside New York City studio STV—the architect-of-record, Tscahpeller completely revamped the interior of the historic Rand Hall, a three-story, steel-and-masonry structure primarily used for printing and, in more recent decades, as architecture studios. In order to upgrade the building for the 21st-century, the design team had to secure its exterior envelope, replace the roof, and add thermal insulation. Thanks to these changes, as well as the integration of new double-glazed windows, the project is expected to reduce energy in Rand Hall by 70 percent. On the interior, Wolfgang Tscahpeller Architekt and STV removed the third floor and reinforced its original cross-beam skeleton so they could input the suspended steel mezzanines where all the books would be stacked, according to Metropolis. The entire renovation took a total of 18 months.       An open reading room takes up significant space on the ground-level but beyond the books, the library is also a hub for art and architecture students to create. There is an 8,300-square-foot lab on the first floor with a material practice center featuring a makers space, a small-tool repository, as well as wood, metal, and digital fabrication shops. This dual utility of the library, both as a place where students can read and build, was one of the most important aspects of the renovation.  “Thus, we have two factories in one building,” said Tscahpeller in a statement. “One factory is for the material, and one is the factory for thought and concepts—both wrapped by Rand Hall to one interacting volume.”   Meejin Yoon, dean of Cornell’s College of Art, Architecture, and Planning (AAP), said this is also what she loves about the project. “The production of new knowledge, ranging from scholarship to research and fabrication and making, tying those activities together as all forms of new knowledge is exciting.”   The library is seamlessly connected via the second and third floors to Milstein Hall next door, a 2011 project designed by OMA for Cornell’s architecture department. The completion of the state-of-the-art structure spurred a number of improvements for the arts campus over the last decade which concluded this year with the Rand Hall renovation. Like the green roof atop Milstein, the library will activate its roof deck with outdoor installations in the warmer months. 

BuildingsNY 2019

EXPERIENCE THE FULL BUILDINGS LIFECYCLE

BuildingsNY is sponsored by ABO (Associated Builders and Owners of Greater New York), CHIP (Community Housing Improvement Program), The AIA, NYARM, ASHRAE LI, and a host of other industry supporters. BuildingsNY is the single source, full product life-cycle solution to safely and cost-effectively operate your buildings with a unique combination of an exhibition, no-cost accredited education, partnership opportunities, and networking events.  

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WHAT'S IN STORE FOR 2019

  • All education sessions will be moved to the show floor, creating three Learning Theaters.
  • Updated Advisory Council consisting of building professionals who shape the industry.
  • New partnerships with a wide range of media, as well as strengthening the relationships with current supporters.
  • Back by popular demand! Tech Tank Pavilion will feature new buildings technologies. Source the next big product or service that can revolutionize building operations as we know it.
  • Unlimited access to the complimentary Lead Retrieval App, which allows you to easily collect, qualify & download the contact details of the customers you meet at BuildingsNY.
  • Education Sessions for 2019 will focus on profitability, compliance and managerial excellence. You'll leave with a fresh perspective on how to solve problems, increase efficiencies, unlock saving and keep your buildings at their peak.
  • Attorney Advice Center: Powered by NYARM – During 15-minute intervals, attorneys and attendees will meet one-on-one focusing on important areas of practice (April 2 and April 3, 2019 | 11:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.| Located at Booth #231

Call for Entries: Reviving NPAK

By the initiative of the Boghossian Foundation, urbanlab announces an open international architectural competition “Reviving NPAK” for all interested individuals and teams. The purpose of the present architectural competition is to find the best design solutions for the existing building of NPAK located at 1/3 Buzand Street of Yerevan (Armenia), which needs to reflect the aspects of the competition package through contemporary architectural language that is conscious of social and environmental responsibility, the importance for radical technical experimentation and the need to sustain a dialogue with the Centre’s legacy and its traditions. Serving as a meeting point between the art community, the youth, general public, the creative and business sector, the revived Centre should become a facilitator between innovative artistic thinking, mass culture and industry. The current redevelopment project is a multi-stage plan for future growth, revivification and expansion of NPAK. It presents an opportunity to create the largest temporary exhibition space in Armenia, which will simultaneously serve as one of the key cultural, entertainment and educational hubs in Yerevan. Participation There is no application fee for participation. The submission deadline is 25 June 2019, while winners will be announced on 3 July 2019. For participation and request for competition package please send an email to npak@urbanlab.am mentioning “Competition Package” in the subject line, following which you will receive the link needed for participation. For more information about the competition and how to participate please follow this link. Award The total award budget is 6’000’000 AMD (approx. 12’000 USD), which will be distributed between the below mentioned award categories.
  • 1st: 2’500’000 AMD (approx. 5’000 USD)
  • 2nd: 1’500’000 AMD (approx. 3’000 USD)
  • 3rd: 1’000’000 AMD (approx. 2’000 USD)
  • Jury’s mention(s): 1’000’000 AMD (approx. 2’000 USD)
Jury The competition Jury consists of nine professionals, the majority being architects from Armenia and abroad. London-based architect Mr. Philip Gumuchdjian will chair over the Jury. The Jury members are:
  1. Philip Gumuchdjian, Architect, Gumuchdjian Architects (UK)
  2. Albert Boghossian, Boghossian Foundation Co-Chairman (Switzerland)
  3. Arthur Meschyan, Architect, Chief Architect of Yerevan (Armenia)
  4. Eduard Balassanian, Architect, NPAK Co-Founder (Armenia, USA)
  5. Misak Khostikyan, Architect, Art Historian (Armenia)
  6. Nadim Karam, Architect, Artist (Lebanon)
  7. Sarhat Petrosyan, Architect, Planner (Armenia)
  8. Verena von Beckerath, Architect, Chair for Design and Housing at Bauhaus-Universität Weimar (Germany)
  9. Vigen Galstyan, Curator, Art Historian (Armenia, Australia)
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Tod Williams Billie Tsien Architects renovates and expands Dartmouth's Hood Museum of Art

Up close, the newly reopened Hood Museum of Art exudes a quiet confidence uncommon in large-scale institutional projects. The architecture, lightly brutalist in form, doesn’t command attention from afar or overwhelm the small campus of Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire. It’s simply inviting. And the same goes for the inside. The design team behind the $50 million renovation and expansion project, Tod Williams Billie Tsien Architects (TWBTA), will be the first to say its intervention is meant to focus a visitor’s experience on the art, not the architecture. But that doesn’t mean the architecture isn’t vital; it’s a backdrop, the architects say. This is an important lesson the pair has been trying to learn throughout the four-decade partnership. “As you grow older, you develop a sense of confidence in yourself,” said Tsien. “When you’re more confident, I think it’s less important that you declare yourself in the architecture.” In the case of the revamped Hood Museum, the firm's own quiet confidence translates into the museum’s bold, yet restrained new look. Situated on a campus full of 19th-century, Georgian-style buildings, the Hood Museum is tucked between a cramped series of structures lining the southern edge of Dartmouth’s historic green—a red-brick library, a glassy performing arts center from the '60s, and a Machado Silvetti–designed visual arts center completed in 2012. The original museum building, which TWBTA meticulously renovated, was designed in 1985 by Charles Moore during his tenure at Centerbrook Architects. In recent years, museum staff started to notice serious structural problems within the building and complained about its outdated interior layout, as well as its lack of light. The staff also needed a larger space for their own offices, due to an ever-growing team, and more teaching facilities to accommodate the 40 departments that use the museum’s 65,000-piece collection for study throughout the year.   The school hired TWBTA to build on Moore’s legacy by adding 16,350 square feet to the existing site, while simultaneously improving wayfinding, smoothing circulation, and bringing light into the formerly dark facility. The design team, led by Azadeh Rashidi, reconfigured the museum’s public-facing identity by creating a new boxy, off-white brick facade that cantilevers over the main entrance and an adjacent pathway. A 14-square-foot vitrine window was cut on the right side of the front facade to tease passersby with a glimpse into the museum’s new sculpture gallery. Williams and Tsien credit the museum’s dedicated staff and curators in helping them calm down their vision for the building so the art could “speak for itself.” The two were compelled to design from the inside out, they said. “We do care about the outside of the building,” said Tsien, “but we really do think about the experience first and foremost. We’re always trying to focus on finding a balance between rest and quiet as well as excitement and movement.” The firm’s 21st-century expansion added six new galleries to the Hood Museum, bringing the total from 10 to 16 galleries spread out over two floors. TWBTA also tripled the number teaching spaces by creating three classrooms within the new Bernstein Center for Object Study, where students can directly engage with single works of art pulled from the museum’s encyclopedic collection. They additionally built out a light-filled office space for museum staff on the top floor and designed a double-height, flex-use atrium connecting the entrance to the adjacent Hopkins Center for Arts. According to the architects, the new lobby can also be a performance or gathering space. To create all this new space, TWBTA had to make a controversial change to the existing Moore building that solicited serious criticism in 2016. They filled in a large, sweeping courtyard that previously served as a gateway from the Green to the surrounding arts buildings and downtown Hanover. The new construction straightened out the Hood Museum and removed a Romanesque archway at the front of the structure that signaled its presence on campus and led visitors to the museum’s actual entrance beyond. John Stomberg, Virginia Rice Kelsey 1961s Director of the Hood Museum, said the move was pivotal for allowing the museum to grow into the modern era and expand its art collection. “We challenged Tod and Billie with the hard task of making a beautiful space that couldn’t increase beyond its current idiosyncratic location,” he said. “What they came up with was an idea so eloquent that it immediately seemed natural. It requires an extended visit to understand how deeply and completely it solves all of the museum’s dilemmas.”
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Hastings Pier, winner of the 2017 Stirling Prize, is at the center of heated public battle

A 147-year-old piece of seaside infrastructure in Hastings, England, is at the center of a nationwide controversy now known as the “Battle of Hastings Pier.” According to The Guardian, Sheikh Abid Gulzar, the new owner of the 2017 RIBA Stirling Prize–winning Hastings Pier, closed the beloved public space last month without notice until March. Locals are livid. The historic structure, which underwent a massive renovation in 2016 by Rijke Marsh Morgan Architects (dRMM), is a Victorian-age wooden pier built in 1872. It’s endured a fraught history since its opening and survived multiple fires, the latest of which nearly destroyed the 300-yard pier in 2010. Through the U.K.’s Heritage Lottery Fund and £14.5 million in public donations, dRMM brought it back to life. A representative from the Friends of Hastings Pier (FoHP) said because local residents invested their own money in the pier’s construction, they deserve more transparency from Gulzar about its future. According to a December 29th post on the Hastings Pier Facebook page, Gulzar decided to shut down access to the pier in order to begin much-needed repairs and improvements. To the public, the pier’s closure is seen as the latest offense by the wealthy hotelier and businessman, whose nickname, “Goldfinger", alludes to the gold-clad cars he drives around London and the gold rings he sports on each finger. Gulzar recently installed a series of golden fiberglass animals on the pier and announced plans to build an on-site amusement park. Protests have broken out over Gulzar's acts, and locals continue to fume over the fact that Gulzar purchased the pier in June for a mere £60,000—a sliver of the millions it took to rehabilitate and restabilize the structure. It’s unclear what will happen next. A spokesman for Gulzar told The Guardian that essential repairs are currently underway on Hastings Pier and it could reopen in mid-February. In recent months, Gulzar has complained about an increase in theft and vandalism as a cause for concern, and repeatedly expressed his commitment to keeping the pier safe. On January 12, he met with local residents and the city council to discuss support in speeding up construction projects on site in order to ensure an earlier opening date.  
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The Senate starts its search for a new Architect of the Capitol

Know any architects looking for an extremely high-profile government job? Okay, so maybe not everyone wants to work for the federal government right now (thanks, 31-day government shutdown). Nevertheless, the search for a new Architect of the Capitol (AOC) is officially underway, reports Roll Call. Anyone who seeks to fill the position will be responsible for overseeing a multitude of preservation and maintenance projects on the Capitol’s campus. A few of those include the $752 million renewal of the Cannon House Office Building, the oldest structure on site, as well as updates to the Beaux Arts–style Russell Senate Office Building, also built over a century ago. The AOC will also be in charge of rehabilitating the Senate Underground Garage and Senate Park, both under construction through 2020, as well as overseeing the continued facade work on the Capitol Building itself. Not only that, he or she will manage all upgrades and maintenance to the Capitol Visitor Center, the Supreme Court Building, the Library of Congress, the U.S. Botanic Garden, and the Capitol Grounds. That’s 18.4 million square feet of federal facilities including 190 structures and 580 acres of landscape sprawled across Capitol Hill. Did we mention it’s full-time? The position is a 10-year term, currently held by Stephen T. Ayers. Nominated in 2010 by President Obama, Ayers oversaw the three-year, $59.5 million restoration of the Capitol Dome, which wrapped up in 2016. Ayers announced his retirement in late November and is leaving behind over $1 billion of deferred maintenance work and a $733 million budget for the new AOC to takeover.  The hunt for a new leader is being spearheaded by the Senate Rules and Administration Committee, a 14-person group that includes the Speaker of the House, the President pro tempore, the majority and minority leaders from both chambers, the chairs and ranking members of the House Administration and Senate Rules Committees, as well as the Appropriations Committee members from both chambers. The group is working with an executive search firm to find three candidates to recommend to President Trump. Once the president makes his pick, the Senate must officially confirm his or her appointment. The confirmed nominee will become the 12th Architect of the Capitol in U.S. history. Several past officeholders were actually not registered architects, which still isn’t a requirement to fill the position.
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Charlotte is converting an old Model T and missile factory into workspaces

S9 Architecture is helping turn an old Ford Model T and army missile manufacturing facility in Charlotte, North Carolina, into the city’s newest hub for creativity and innovation. Camp North End, a long-empty industrial site just northeast of downtown, will feature 1.8 million square feet of office, retail, and event space set inside its historic, early 19th-century factory. New York-based developer ATCO Properties purchased the site in 2016 and opened it to the public last year. Various vendors have populated the grounds, and it’s been a hotbed of activity ever since, housing countless companies and office space for coffee roasters, media professionals, artists, and startups alike. It’s also been home to several exciting festivals and arts programs put on in the various open spaces. S9’s master plan for the 76-acre campus will transform the site into a sustainable spot for businesses to put down permanent roots. ATCO brought on S9 to collaborate on the adaptive reuse of the complex’s 12 main buildings and connect them through experiential passageways. In between each structure, the team will lay out gathering spaces for people to eat, hang out, or put on events. The build-out will also include space for future residential and hospitality developments. While many of the buildings on the site are already in use, ATCO and S9 are renovating four larger areas in the first phase of construction: the Gama Goat Building, the Mount, a 24,000 square-foot former Ford factory building, and the adjacent boiler building. The latter two were designed by Detroit architect Albert Kahn in the 1920s. The design will substantially retrofit the dilapidated structures and add a contemporary edge to the facility. This isn’t the first large-scale placemaking project the Brooklyn-based firm has done in recent years. S9’s design for Ponce City Market converted an outdated Sears building in Atlanta’s Old Fourth Ward into a coveted piece of real estate for top tech companies and local food vendors. Also under the firm's industrial reuse belt is Dumbo’s Empire Stores in New York City, as well as Dock 72 in the Brooklyn Navy Yard, home of WeWork’s New York headquarters.
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Check out these eight unmatched tennis courts from around the world

Tennis courts may be universally designed in the same way, but their topographic location can change the entire look and feel of playing the great game. In honor of the US Open, we’ve rounded up some of the world’s most architecturally impressive courts. From the ever-imaginative buildings within the United Arab Emirates to the secret spaces of Paris, these amazing athletic facilities placed in unbelievable settings feature inspired designs that date from present day, all the way back to the late 19th century. Take a scroll and let your sporty side roam around the globe with these ace spaces: The Couch, Amsterdam, The Netherlands The IJburg Tennis Club near Amsterdam houses 10 clay courts, a tennis school, and a temporary communal building with integrated rooftop seating designed by Dutch firm MVRDV. Acting as a giant piece of street furniture, the red-sprayed concrete structure features a curvaceous roof that dips down towards ground level on the south side, while the north side rises 23 feet high, allowing for bleacher-like seating overlooking the courts. The wood-clad interior boasts ample natural light thanks to wide glass that spans the front and south sides of the building. Burj Al Arab Tennis Court, Dubai, U.A.E. Twelve years ago, Andre Agassi and Roger Federer held an exhibition on the helipad of the Burj Al Arab, the third tallest hotel in the world. Designed by Tom Wright of WKK Architects, the structure stands like the sail of a ship at 1,053 feet tall. The helipad covers 4,467 square feet of space and a grass court was laid out across it for this one-time match. Since its completion, the site has been home to other iconic sports moments: Golfers Tiger Woods and Rory McIlroy teed off of the helipad in separate years while Formula One racecar driver David Coulthard performed donuts on the surface in 2013. Dubai could also soon build the world’s first underwater tennis complex off its coast in the Persian Gulf, a vision by Polish architect Krzysztof Kotala, founder of 8+8 Studio. La Cavalerie Tennis Club, Paris Set on the sixth floor of an art deco building with an Aston Martin dealership at its base, this hidden tennis club sports weathered wood paneling and a dramatic, honeycomb-style arched roof. The building itself, designed by famous French architect R. Farradèche in 1924, includes a close-up view of the Eiffel Tower which can be seen from the balconies of the club.  The hard court was established as a national monument in 1986 and features 1,400 pieces of wood that shape the parabolic interior design.   Astor Courts, Rhinebeck, New York This private tennis pavilion is situated within the historic upstate guesthouse and casino of John Jacob Astor IV. Designed in 1902 by Stanford White, the indoor and outdoor sports complex included squash courts, a bowling alley, a shooting range, and an indoor swimming pool. It was designed in the style of the Grand Trianon, a château found at Versailles in France. After being purchased by its current owner in 2003 for over $3 million, PBDW Architects rehabilitated the 20,000-square-foot mansion where Chelsea Clinton and Marc Mezvinsky were married in 2010. Infinity Court, Los Angeles, California Located at the John Lautner-designed Sheats-Goldstein House, this seemingly floating tennis court provides spectacular, sweeping views of Los Angeles. The house is currently owned by the colorful real estate investor, NBA lover, and fashion designer James Goldstein and was recently acquired by the L.A. County Museum of Art as its first-ever architectural acquisition. When Goldstein bought the property in 1972, he began working with Lautner on several updates and additions to the house. The on-site, infinity-edge court was designed atop a three-level entertainment complex built in collaboration with Lautner’s colleague. It features a glass partition barely visible from the other side of the outdoor space. Tennis Courts at the SLS Lux, Miami, Florida Arquitectonica’s design for the just-completed SLS Lux Brickell Hotel and Residences in South Beach includes a multi-use sports center atop the ninth floor of the 57-story tower. Tennis courts, a rock climbing wall, as well as spaces for volleyball, basketball, and more, allow the residents of the building’s 450 luxury condos, 12 penthouses, and 84 hotel rooms an opportunity for ample play. The base of the building features a colorful, 40,000-square-foot mural on its exterior by Fabian Burgos, a world-renowned Argentinian artist who creates optical designs for architecture. Vanderbilt Tennis and Fitness Club, New York City, New York Since the 1960s, a secret has existed within the walls of New York’s famed Grand Central Terminal: It houses a secluded tennis club. For over ten years, city dwellers could pay to play at the original Vanderbilt Athletic Club, founded by Hungarian athlete and refugee Geza Gazdag. The club housed two clay courts and a 65-foot indoor ski slope built on the third-floor Annex of the train depot. Since Gazdag was priced out of his lease, the coveted piece of real estate began a fraught history of ownership. Donald Trump took it over for three decades, turning it into an elite club for the city’s wealthiest tennis fans. Once his lease ran out in 2009, the space became a lounge for the Metropolitan Transit Authority and new courts were built on the fourth floor where current owner Anthony Scholnick manages the facility.
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Yale is set to renovate the landmark Peabody Museum of Natural History

Yale University is slated to renovate and expand one of its oldest campus institutions, the Peabody Museum of Natural History on Science Hill. Thanks in part to a just-announced $160-million donation from philanthropist and Yale alumnus Edward P. Bass, the project will be the first major update the landmark museum has received in 93 years. The master plan, conceived by Centerbrook Architects and Planners, marks one of the boldest and most thoughtful endeavors the university has taken on in recent years. After well over a decade of planning, the project will yield 50 percent more exhibition space for the museum and improve storage for its on-site collection of over 13 million artifacts. It will also include the addition of a new, four-story infill structure that will connect the neighboring Environmental Science Center. The sky-lit, glass-enclosed connector will give students seamless access into the museum, where Centerbrook will create more modern spaces for research and study. One of Yale’s main goals for the addition, said Centerbrook’s principal Mark Simon, was to complement the timeless architecture of the original Peabody building, a three-story, French Gothic Revival, sandstone structure by renowned campus architect Charles Klauder. Using fritted glass and bronze-colored aluminum framing, the cathedral-like tower will bring a contemporary edge to the aged institution. “The Peabody community wanted to maintain a family resemblance or identity throughout the new and old structures,” said Simon. “It’s always tricky to do something that’s up-to-date but connects well with the historic fabric, but we’re all very pleased with this design.” The building out of the glass tower will be done in the initial phases of construction, Simon said. After that, the renovation of the museum’s existing spaces can begin. So far, a timeline for construction hasn’t been announced as Yale is currently strategizing on how to safely remove portions of the Peabody’s collection to a facility on its West Campus. Both the museum, as well as the other science buildings being updated during the project, will remain open throughout construction to students, faculty, and the 130,000 visitors—which includes 25,000 regional school children—who visit the Peabody each year. Other elements of the master plan include creating new classrooms, labs, and learning spaces for collections-based teaching and scientific exploration. The museum, founded in 1866, has been home to some of the most important discoveries in history and Yale hopes the renovation will help carry on the Peabody’s legacy of advancement in the industry. “As one of Yale’s greatest resources, this museum will provide hands-on learning for students across various undergraduate programs,” said Simon, “and allow them to engage in the processes of the museum itself from research and restoration, to designing exhibits and presenting their work in the galleries.” Centerbrook is one of Yale’s long-time partners. The local firm has completed 12 projects for the university from Kroon Hall, which they designed in collaboration with Hopkins Architects, to the Child Study Center, the renovated and expanded Reese Stadium—home of the men’s and women’s soccer and lacrosse programs—as well as an addition to the historic Yale Bowl. While Simon has worked extensively on many of these buildings, the Peabody renovation is a game-changer for the firm. “We are over the moon that this is finally coming to fruition,” he said. “Each year we spend on it, it seems more and more important to do. It’s more than just another university museum upgrade. You get a sense that this project will not only have a major impact on education at Yale, but on the world at large.”
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Philly is set to open new arts pier inside a century-old maritime warehouse this fall

Downtown Philadelphia will debut its newest cultural space this fall: an unlikely arts venue, marketplace, bar, and public park set inside a converted 99-year-old maritime warehouse. Cherry Street Pier, designed by Groundswell Design Group and Interface Studio Architects, will open on October 12 at Pier 9 along the Delaware River. The $5-million project will transform the 55,000-square-foot municipal structure into a mixed-use waterfront destination and studio facility for 14 local artists. Located south of the Benjamin Franklin Bridge and the Race Street Pier, the long-neglected, 19th-century building has undergone major renovation work over the last year. The project, dreamed up by the Delaware River Waterfront Corporation (DRWC), aims to introduce a new space for civic engagement as well as a collaborative home for the city’s visionary artists and entrepreneurs. The group announced Wednesday that the park will open ahead of the three-week arts celebration, Festival for the People, put on by the Philadelphia Contemporary. According to Philly Magazine, DRWC president Joe Forkin said that the Cherry Street Pier will serve as a foundation for the arts to flourish along the city’s waterfront. The historic building will house affordable studios and offices for emerging artists within repurposed shipping containers featuring glass walls. Community members and visitors to the dock can peer inside the studio spaces—dubbed the Garage— and watch the artists at work throughout the day. Tenants will be able to showcase their art in a 10,800-square-foot open space dedicated to large-scale art installations and performances. The site will also include room for a pop-up retail market, public events, and food vendors. A café and bar are being built for the open-air garden at the edge of the facility. The architects will peel back the roof of the warehouse in this section, exposing the steel trusses and stone masonry to reveal the historic structure’s core and unveil a unique perspective of the river. Wood benches, railings, plants, and trees will fill the space so people can relax and enjoy one another’s company.
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2017 Best of Design Awards for Building Renovation

2017 Best of Design Award for Building Renovation: Black House Architect: Oza / Sabbeth Architecture Location: Sagaponack, New York This project is an adaptive reuse of a quintessentially “humble” ranch home dating back to the postwar era. The design forms privacy zones that allow for multiple uses within the confines of a small footprint. The house was expanded by a private courtyard, an indoor-outdoor dining space, and an art studio. All these spaces are simultaneously linked and hemmed in by a glazed vestibule that also serves as the entrance. Inspired by a piece of furniture designed by Ineke Hans for the Danish design group Moooi, the architects developed an exterior skin of black rubber and recycled plastic (80 percent post-consumer). The rubber serves to seal the existing structure from the elements and the recycled plastic screen forms a protective barrier for the rubber skin while also doubling as a sunshade to mitigate heat gain on the black surface. "The innovative facade got my attention, but it was the plan that really captured my interest. A surprising subversion of a common domestic type and a smart use of space. ”
—Morris Adjmi, Principal, Morris Adjmi Architects (juror)
 Landscape: Geoffrey Nimmer Landscapes Builder: Saldana Builders Engineer: Struktur Studio   Honorable Mentions Project: Billboard Building Architect: SHULMAN + ASSOCIATES Location: Miami, Florida Next to an interstate highway, this three-story, 1920s commercial building occupies a narrow lot in Miami’s Design District. Shulman + Associates’ design for the renovation incorporates the existing building, expanding it with a 90-foot addition. The west facade functions as a commercial billboard space, while another facade is designed for art installations. Honorable Mention Project: The Beckoning Path Architect: BarlisWedlick Architects Location: Armonk, NY The Beckoning Path converts a hillside home into a wellness center and retreat. The 1961 house featured a timber-framed roof perched within the tree canopy. The renovation completely opens the glass pavilion of the upper level, reinforces the monolithic plinth of the lower level, and inserts a hovering green roof and indoor pool.