Posts tagged with "R & Company":

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Collective Design Fair 2017 Recap

Collective Design opened today for its fifth fair focused on 20th- and 21st-century design with 28 exhibitors. Founded by architect and interior designer Steven Learner specifically for the design and architectural community, the fair will host galleries, designers, and commercial brands from May 3 to May 7. The design world continues to be enraptured by surrealism and, as a result, bright colors and fantastical forms reigned throughout. Paris-based Swiss designer, Mattia Bonetti’s work was highlighted as the Collective Influence installation that included Bonetti’s riotous sofa and Seussical-style lamp and side table. Just around the corner, R & Company touted the new generation of maximal whimsy with pieces by the Haas Brothers, Katie Stout, and Porky Hefer. More and more, companies are integrating technology to take the possibility of designs to new heights. At Collective, Othr’s 3-D printed works and Flavor Paper’s use of water-based conductive ink make a strong showing. Othr’s Vanguard Series took advantage of 3-D printing (Othr 3-D prints all of its wares, partnering with designers to create its pieces) by having Murray Moss, Annabelle Selldorf, Felix Burrichter, Christian Larsen, and India Mahdavi each nominate an emerging designer to create a piece for Othr. As a result, Egg Collective, GT2P, Ania Jaworska, Marie-Victoire Winckler, and Chen Chen and Kai Williams all created stunning vessels in a variety of 3-D printed porcelain, steel, and bronze. Flavor Paper presented Conduct, a playful immersive installation that demonstrated the ability of wallpaper to transfer energy. Flavor Paper founder Jon Sherman discovered water-based conductive ink two years ago and partnered with UM Project to help display its potential. By pressing dots on the wallpaper, one can activate lights, sound, and movement in the installation. Other highlights included new iterations of Apparatus’s, Stickbulb’s, and Calico Wallpaper’s offerings from Milan Design Week, as well as the Noguchi Museum’s Waiting Room installation of Robert Stadler and Isamu Noguchi’s works, which coincides with an exhibition at the museum (far, far away in Queens). Thanks to Collective Design’s manageable size (one can easily navigate the entire show in under two hours), and fresh offerings, it will undoubtedly be a popular stop on this month’s design circuit.
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Catch this show of Lina Bo Bardi’s furniture and Roberto Burle Marx’s tapestries before it closes!

Tribeca's R & Company gallery at 82 Franklin Street is highlighting two Brazilian greats: Lina Bo Bardi (1914–1992) and Roberto Burle Marx (1909–1994). But act fast! Furniture by Bo Bardi and tapestries by Burle Marx are on display through the end of this week—the exhibit closes April 30. Lina Bo Bardi is best known for her monumental architecture, such as the sturdy São Paulo Museum of Art or the rugged SESC Pompéia in São Paulo. But her work in this exhibit, Lina Bo Bardi + Roberto Burle Marx, represents a much smaller scale. Furniture designed from the 1950s through the 1980s and executed in wood, metal, and leather show how her Brazilian modern thinking translated to the size of a chair. Designs dually showcase strong geometry and classic Brazilian curves that are a hallmark of her larger built work. In fact, a dining set on view in the exhibit was designed with Marcelo Ferraz and Marcelo Suzuki for the SESC Pompéia. Complementing Bo Bardi's furniture are textiles and totems by Roberto Burle Marx, generally regarded as the father of Brazilian landscape architecture. Playful patterns and geometric shapes are present in a variety of Burle Marx's larger projects such as the iconic Copacabana boardwalk, a modern interpretation of historic Portuguese paving designs; collaborations with Oscar Niemeyer in Brasilia; and private estates throughout the country. Zoom out on these landscape designs and you can see a clear connection between the large-format works and his smaller textiles and tapestries. In addition to landscape architecture, Burle Marx was a trained artist and sculptor with a keen interest in Brazilian folk art, themes that appear in his colorful wooden totems on display in this exhibit. Check out these works for yourself at R & Company in Tribeca through April 30.