Posts tagged with "Projections":

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Digital artist Miguel Chevalier syncs science and spirituality at King’s College Chapel, Cambridge

Paris-based digital projection artist Miguel Chevalier turned the University of Cambridge’s 16th century King’s College Chapel into an intellectual hypnosis chamber during the recent Dear World… Yours, Cambridge charity event. As each speaker presented, Chevalier illustrated their points with projected lights designed specifically to the chapel’s interior. For example, when hearing of Stephen Hawking’s research on black holes, the chapel became a sea of constellations. Professor Hawking told the invited audience, "When I arrived in Cambridge I was lucky. I was lucky to meet the brilliant minds that broadened my horizons. I was lucky to be given the space to think, and I chose to think about space." Chevalier is the first artist invited to make a spectacle in the 500 year old Perpendicular Gothic chapel. And his projections accompanied speeches of  renowned professors and alumni. According to Chevalier, the Cambridge project "imagines a number of different graphic universes, which are generated in real time and use their own ‘digital’ language to illustrate and interpret a wide variety of subjects including academic excellence, health, Africa, biology, neurosciences, physics, and biotechnologies." Previously, Chevalier created displays for the 1992 Olympic Games in Barcelona and Paris' Grand Palais.
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The Doors Project: Projecting Gateways onto Obstacles

In an ongoing endeavor to blend public art, architecture, and urbanism by artists Siyuan and Hwee Chong, The Doors Project subversively projects a series of doors onto public spaces in Singapore, reflecting the struggles of the urban poor and underprivileged. But while commenting on despair, the real message is one of faith, hope and empowerment. “We wanted to make a statement about life, and jolt people to think,” the artists said in an interview at Yolo. “Instead of following the light at the end of the tunnel, why not carry our own lights, and create our own doors! It’s really about rolling up our sleeves, and creating the opportunities we want for ourselves.” Inspired by true stories of people they’ve met—from a boy mastering kung fu to protect his mother from his abusive father to an Indian worker desperately raising money for his son’s surgery—the installation provokes the viewer to re-imagine boundaries as thresholds, opacity as reflection, and life’s roadblocks as opportunities. “These people, despite much hoping and praying, are faced with countless roadblocks that take them nowhere,” they said. According to Siyuan and Hwee Chong, people should take a giant leap of faith, work hard at what they believe in most, and open their own “doors” in life. “It’s just more meaningful that way.” Expect more public installations from Siyuan and Hwee Chong in the near future. “’Doors is meant to be an ongoing project. There’s no end date to it. For as long as we keep collecting stories of hope and despair, we’ll keep projecting people’s ‘doors’ onto roadblocks.” Read the full interview with the artists at Yolo or check out The Doors Project's website for more.  
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Seeing stars indoors with Encounter

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Simple materials get elevated in a paper-and-staples homage to  Isaac Newton's cenotaph

French neoclassical architect Étienne-Louis Boullée may have drafted his famous proposal for a cenotaph for Isaac Newton in 1784, but his ideas continue to influence architects to this day, like RISD architecture graduate student, Greg Nemes, whose recent project, Encounter, draws inspiration from the nighttime starlight effect in the interior of Boullée's proposed monument. "It was an exploration in my thesis project," said Nemes. "The intention was to make an immersive space out of a ceilingscape using...a defamiliarization of space, scale, and material." After defining the curvature of the surface topology in Rhino, Nemes used Grasshopper to create triangular tessellations separated by perforations that "increase in diameter as the triangles increase in elevation, so the triangles at the top of the dome have the largest perforations." Nemes also used Grasshopper for unrolling, tabbing, labeling and packing the triangles onto sheets that were laser cut with a half-inch tab on all sides. With the help of friends, Nemes folded all the tabs and stapled them together into groups of 10-12.  These grouping were then transported to the Gelman Gallery at RISD's Design Museum, where they were hung together with monofilaments and strung across the ceiling with four steel cables. It's hard to believe that the expansive and transformative ceiling installation was made from such humble materials. Though Encounter functions best when the lights are off, it speaks to Nemes' abilities as a fabricator, perhaps even as craftsman, that he was able to create an immersive environment with real architectural potential out of paper and staples. In total, Encounter measured 20' x 13' x 10,' filling almost the entire room. A small space was kept open for visitors to watch the light show Nemes created with a "computational color pattern to gradually affect the light and coloring of the space." It was shown using two projectors during a month-long exhibition called "Tickling Your Eyeballs." Watch the short video of the making of Encounter and see it in action. Encounter4 ENCOUNTER Encounter Encounter Encounter Encounter2  
 
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Making Buildings Dream

From Germany via Dangerous Minds comes this stunning 3-D architectural illusion: A square building appears possessed, its facade rippling, segmenting and mutating. Giant hands manipulate the building's surface and then dissolve. A wave ripples through the building's bricks as if it were shivering. It's called "How it would be, if a house was dreaming," and it's a trompe-l'oeuil video projection by Hamburg-based creative collective UrbanScreen. The title's perfectly apt, as these look like nothing so much as disjoint visions flitting across the subconscious of a slumbering building. The building in question is O.M. Unger's Galerie der Gegenwart in Hamburg, completed in 1997 as the final wing of the Kunsthalle Hamburg art museum. Its facade is flat, gridded, and largely windowless, severe by day, but a perfect pixellated canvas for UrbanScreen's fantasies by night. A steady stream of passers-by on the sidewalk below—some stopping to watch, others simply going about their business—make the metamorphosing building behind them seem all the more surreal.