Posts tagged with "Projection Mapping":

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Digital artist Miguel Chevalier syncs science and spirituality at King’s College Chapel, Cambridge

Paris-based digital projection artist Miguel Chevalier turned the University of Cambridge’s 16th century King’s College Chapel into an intellectual hypnosis chamber during the recent Dear World… Yours, Cambridge charity event. As each speaker presented, Chevalier illustrated their points with projected lights designed specifically to the chapel’s interior. For example, when hearing of Stephen Hawking’s research on black holes, the chapel became a sea of constellations. Professor Hawking told the invited audience, "When I arrived in Cambridge I was lucky. I was lucky to meet the brilliant minds that broadened my horizons. I was lucky to be given the space to think, and I chose to think about space." Chevalier is the first artist invited to make a spectacle in the 500 year old Perpendicular Gothic chapel. And his projections accompanied speeches of  renowned professors and alumni. According to Chevalier, the Cambridge project "imagines a number of different graphic universes, which are generated in real time and use their own ‘digital’ language to illustrate and interpret a wide variety of subjects including academic excellence, health, Africa, biology, neurosciences, physics, and biotechnologies." Previously, Chevalier created displays for the 1992 Olympic Games in Barcelona and Paris' Grand Palais.
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This Saturday, a projection-mapped display will cover the Empire State Building to raise awareness about endangered species

As supertall residential towers reach new heights in Manhattan, the Empire State Building still stands strong in New York City's skyline—especially after dusk. The building's crown is quintessential New York and a sky-high representation of holidays, anniversaries, and the day's news in colorful light. On Saturday night, the Empire State Building will be used for even more. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MwxyrLUdcss The New York Times reported that images of endangered species will be projected onto the Art Deco icon to raise awareness about mass extinction. The project comes from the minds of Travis Threlkel, the chief creative officer of Obscura Digital, and Louie Psihoyos, founder of the Oceanic Preservation Society and director of The Cove.  Saturday's event is also a means to bring attention to Racing Extinction (trailer above), Psihoyos' latest documentary. According to the Times, "A snow leopard, a golden lion tamarin and manta rays, along with snakes, birds and various mammals and sea creatures will be projected onto a space 375 feet tall and 186 feet wide covering 33 floors of the southern face of the Empire State Building — and beyond, thanks to cellphones and Internet connections." The project, which will reportedly cost more than $1 million, is being partially covered by a philanthropic foundation founded by Hong Kong billionaire Li Ka-shing. The event will of course have an increased potency given the current firestorm surrounding the killing of the beloved Cecil the lion by a Minnesota dentist. The images will be displayed from 9:00p.m. to 12:00a.m.
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See the Grand Palais submerged in a virtual waterfall in 3D projection mapping design by Japanese art collective teamLab

Recently, Paris’ Grand Palais was awash in the cascade of a virtual waterfall, transforming the beaux-arts palace into a captivating scene from the lost city of Atlantis. TeamLab, a Japanese collective of technologists and artists, used 3D projection mapping to create the holographic play of light and shadow, while maintaining a fidelity to the laws of physics. The artists calculated the movement of the waterfall by creating a 3D model of the Grand Palais des Champs-Élysées in a virtual computer environment and allowing water to cascade over it. “The water is expressed as continuum of hundreds of thousand of water particles that flow in accordance with how the computer calculates the interaction of the particles,” teamLab explained in a post on its website. “Once an accurate water flow simulation has been constructed, 0.1 percent of the water particles are selected and lines drawn in relation to them. The waterfall is expressed as the combination of these lines.” The torrents of water fall with arresting slowness and are deflected as they “collide” with the silent statues and columns of the magnificent building. TeamLab, the brains behind Tokyo’s interactive hanging gardens and LED Christmas trees, programmed a slight time lag into the cascade as a nod to their Japanese ancestors, who perceived time and space as “on a longer axis.” The artists allege that only if one “does not feel a barrier between them and the waterfall,” or, in other words, cedes their full attention, can the viewer truly experience the artwork’s underlying intent. The projection mapping light show was created as part of the Art Paris Art Fair 2015.
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3D projection technology fleetingly brings back the Bamiyan Buddha that was destroyed by the Taliban

The hollow in the sandstone cliffs of Bamiyan, central Afghanistan, still harks back to the looming Bamiyan Buddha statues that once emerged from the cliff-face, before they were destroyed by the Taliban in 2001. A Chinese couple has created 3D projection technology to holographically recreate the destroyed statues which, standing at 180 feet and 120 feet respectively, lorded over the Bamiyan valley for 1500 years. https://twitter.com/alibomaye/status/607259092265148416/photo/1 Representing the classic style of Gandhara art, the monuments withstood the armies of Genghis Khan and the introduction of Islam to the region, as well as multiple artillery rounds by the Taliban, which eventually deferred to explosives when their firing failed to make a dent. “These idols have been the gods of infidels,” Taliban leader Mullah Muhammad Omar reportedly declared in marking the statues for destruction. In 2005, Japanese artist Hiro Yamagata proposed a laser show system to recreate the Buddhas, but the project was never implemented. On display for two days in June, the holograms were cast from projectors mounted on scaffolding, the work of a Chinese couple who are traveling the world to film a documentary. Moved by the legacy of the statues and their destruction, they decided to add Bamiyan to their itinerary and provide the projection as a gift from the people of China to the Afghan people.
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On View> New Orleans’ neoclassical Gallier Hall washed in dynamic light for LUNA Fête

On November 30, the Arts Council New Orleans launched LUNA Fête, a large-scale, outdoor light and sound installation that can be experienced free by the public at Lafayette Square. The centerpiece of the event is a projection mapping display by French art group La Maison Productions that transforms the Crescent City's former city hall (Gallier Hall, 1853) into a neoclassical canvas. The nine-minute animated work plays on the columns and contours of the Greek Revival edifice with a richly layered spectacle inspired by the music and cultural history of New Orleans. La Maison Productions used four large projectors to animate the facade with its symbolically loaded and musically inspired motion graphics. The installation features an original score by Cyril Salvagnac. "This installation is very different from the other projection mapping installations we have created in the past, where we used more classical music with the graphic images," said La Maision Productions founder Sebastien Salvagnac, who worked on the project with creative imagery director Damien Fontaine. "The music of New Orleans inspired us to go in directions we had never tried before." Arts Council New Orleans commissioned the project and launched LUNA Fête to celebrate and promote the local art community. It is assessing the feasibility of making it a yearly event in the run-up to the city's 2018 tricentennial. The projection will take place twice nightly at 7:00 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. until December 6.
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Video> Gaudi’s Sagrada Familia Awash in Psychedelic Light

Residents of Barcelona had the opportunity to see Antoni Gaudi’s 120-year-old La Sagrada Familia in a new light recently as Montreal-based media studio and light artists Moment Factory projection mapped a multimedia display over the cathedral's facade. While Gaudi's signature stone carvings portraying dripping stone, fanciful plant forms, and intricate religious displays in their normally sand-colored hue are usually enough to dazzle the viewers eye, the gaudy splash provided one psychedelic experience. The fifteen minute show, Ode à la vie, projected clouds and cascading waterfalls on the church’s facade, complete with fog and a soundtrack by Anthony Rozankovic and Misteur Valaire. The display attracted a crowed of 32,000 people who were showered with thousands of shimmering LED butterflies. Inspiration came from Gaudi himself who envisioned the cathedral full of color upon its completion, estimated for 2026. The show certainly mirrored Gaudi’s style that greeted an old traditional world with fantastical modern design.