Posts tagged with "Photography":

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Photo of the Day: Central Park Aerial Panorama

We've all become accustomed to seeing aerial photography from apps like Google Maps, but this aerial panorama by Russian photographer Sergey Semonov presents Manhattan's Central Park and its surrounding cityscape with fascinating new detail. The Atlantic found the image, submitted as part of the Epson International Photographic Pano Awards. Created in collaboration with aerial-panorama-makers AirPano, the team photographed the park from a helicopter and later stitched the various images together creating the unique, albeit slightly distorted, view of the city.
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On View> Marking Time at New York’s Yossi Milo Gallery through January 19

Marking Time Yossi Milo Gallery 245 10th Avenue New York Through January 19 Chris McCaw’s continuing work on Sunburned, a series of photographs that began in 2006, will be displayed in his solo exhibit Marking Time. By combining a large-format camera with a high-tech lens normally used for military surveillance and inserting expired gelatin silver photo paper, McCaw captures images of the sun, exposing the paper from anywhere between 15 minutes to 24 hours. The extended exposures intensify the sun’s rays on the photo paper burning holes on the photographs. Thus, McCaw is able to capture and track the earth’s orbit around the sun. His photographs are taken at various locations across the globe including the Galapagos, the Sierras, and the Arctic Circle, enabling him to capture different rotations of the sun due to solar eclipses or equinoxes. In his image Sunburned GSP #429 (North Slope Alaska, 24 hours) McCaw captures the trajectory of midnight sun during the Arctic Circle’s summer solstice. The sun’s path dips to the horizon line then rises, marking the beginning of a new day.
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PRODUCT> “Le Corbusier and the Power of Photography”

Though books typically fall outside the scope of what we consider to be architectural products, we're making an exception for Thames & Hudson's new publication, Le Corbusier and the Power of Photography. Those familiar with Corbu's much photographed architectural work may not know that he was something of a shutterbug himself. According to the publisher, he not only "harnessed the power of the photographic image to define and disseminate his persona, his ideas and buildings," but his influence on the medium led to the rise of photography in general. From another perspective the book provides a more intimate way to access Le Corbusier's creative process and some of the surprising inspirations behind his work, including images of him in his preferred office attire—his birthday suit. Images courtesy of It's Nice That.
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On View> Naoya Hatakeyoma: Natural Stories at SFMOMA

Naoya Hatakeyoma: Natural Stories San Francisco Museum of Modern Art 151 Third Street San Francisco Through November 4 Naoya Hatakeyoma’s award winning photography contrasts the reciprocal impact of human industries on the natural world and that of natural forces on human activities. His photographs, ranging in topic from German coalmines to the underground Tokyo sewer systems, chronicle manmade industrial formations from their time of creation to their degeneration and ultimate decay, all captured in a seemingly objective yet sublime manner. Through this impartial method, devoid of speculation and sentiment, Hatakeyoma’s images garner the greatest impression on the viewer. Hatakeyoma was born in Rikuzentakata in Iwate Prefecture in 1958. His latest work, Rikuzentakata illustrates the devastation caused by the 2011 Tohoku earthquake and tsunami in his birthplace. In the first ever solo U.S museum exhibition, curated by Lisa J. Sutcliffe, SFMOMA showcases more than 100 photographs and 2 video installations spanning Hatakeyoma’s entire career.
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Event> Chris Payne’s “One Steinway Place,” Lecture September 13

Chris Payne: One Steinway Place
Bonni Benrubi Gallery 41 East 57th Street New York Through September 29 Lecture 6:30-8pm South Street Seaport Museum September 13
One Steinway Place, the address of the venerable Steinway & Sons piano factory in Astoria, Queens, is also the title of photographer Chris Payne's latest show at the Bonni Benrubi Gallery in midtown Manhattan.  The series of large-format photographs are the result of  his days and weeks spent in the factory, to which Steinway gave him full access. Payne captures the unexpected and striking forms, patterns, and textures that emerge when he turns his lens to pianos-in-the making. "A piano is something we all think of and love as a whole, but like anything complex, it is really just a kit of parts, built up gradually out of raw, messy materials. And yet, the deeper I look into its construction, the more I revere it as one of the supreme accomplishments of the human hand and imagination," said Payne. On September 13 at the South Street Seaport Museum, Payne will speak about his Steinway project as well as his photographic series about North Brother Island. The lecture (6:30-8pm) is hosted by Open House New York.  For information and tickets, click HERE.
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On View> The Future of Yesterday

The Future of Yesterday: Photographs of Architectural Remains at World's Fairs Nelson-Atkins Museum 45th and Oak Streets, Kansas City, MO Through September 9 In conjunction with Inventing the Modern World: Decorative Arts at the World’s Fairs 1851–1939, the Nelson-Atkins Museum presents the first solo American exhibition of Belgian artist Ives Maes. In contrast to the technological and stylistic innovation showcased in the companion exhibition, Maes provides a study of the lasting artifacts of the world’s fair utopian aspirations. The photographs uncover fair grounds as they stand today, sometimes repurposed but often abandoned or in ruins (such as the site of London’s Crystal Palace, above), juxtaposing the optimism of the architects’ vision with the reality of the present. Co-curator Catherine L. Futter explains, “Ives’ visually compelling images and sculptural presentation lead us to examine the condition, context and activities of the sites in the present, yet evoke the magnificent and progressive ideals of these global events.”
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On View> LACMA Presents Robert Adams: The Place We Live

Robert Adams: The Place We Live Los Angeles County Museum of Art 5905 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles Through June 3 In his 45 years photographing the American West, Robert Adams has documented the evolution of landscape and our relationship to it. In response to the rapid development of his surroundings in Colorado Springs and Denver, Adams began photographing a landscape marked by tract housing, highways, and gas stations. His photographs, Adams says, “document a separation from ourselves, and in turn from the natural world that we professed to love.” Nearly 300 prints showcase Adams’ career, from his early shots of Colorado’s desolate terrain to his recent works documenting migrating birds in the Pacific Northwest, with special focus on his portrayal of the Los Angeles region.
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Pictorial> Jim Kazanjian’s Victorian Apocalypse

Jim Kazanjian doesn't make photographs of buildings, he makes photographs into buildings. His assemblages of "found" structures create fantastic worlds that resemble the post-civilization wreckage of 19th century England.  Through the collapse of time and expansion of space, each collage tells an eerie story about making the familiar unfamiliar.   Kazanjian works as a CG artist for companies such as Nike, Adidas, NBC, CBS, HBO, NASA, HP, Intel, and others, but in his spare time, he uses these talents to create digital images that resemble early twentieth century analog stills.  Some compositions require up to 50 photographs, but none use a camera as part of the process. It is a haunting, timeless collection which he describes as "hyper-collage." While the results offer a glimpse into the artist's imagination, the process offers architects another weapon for exploration. By piecing together existing pictures into something so radically different, the artist has broken from the restraints of photography, and can create whatever he can imagine. It is a technique which holds much potential. Check out more collages on Jim Kazanjian's web site or purchase a limited edition print here.
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On View> Jan Staller: Heavy Duty Landscapes

Jan Staller: Heavy Duty Landscapes ISE Cultural Foundation 555 Broadway Through March 2 Jan Staller: Heavy Duty Landscapes, an exhibition curated by Marc Freidus, at the ISE Cultural Foundation, features sixteen large format photographs selected from series completed by Staller during the past seven years. Roadsides, recycling plants, and construction sites like the one featured in Pilings, Flushing, Queens (above) are the types of overlooked landscapes Staller addresses in his work. Through his lens we see the unexpected beauty of harsh, chaotic industrial sites and objects softened by their natural surroundings, as in Tank Car In Snow, Port Reading, New Jersey (below).
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Pictorial> Models Capture the Surreal and Absurd

German photographer Frank Kunert is out to challenge your sense of perception and expectation with his meticulously crafted and hilariously absurd miniature scenes. His series "Photographs of Small Worlds" presents glimpses into mundane vignettes gone awry, where doors don't meet balconies, diving boards lead to giant toilets, or an office is eerily underwater. Each model takes weeks—and sometimes months—to build, and Kunert is a perfectionist who won't stop until every detail is just right. The end result is well worth the wait. Kunert prefers the "analog" nature of hand-built models to their digitally rendered counterparts. He believes the tangibility of his miniature worlds adds to their visual effect. Individual model's meaning is left up to the viewer, each evoking a sense of fear, the grotesque, unease, or pure absurdity. What do you you see in Kunert's Small Worlds? Be sure to check out more miniatures on Frank Kunert's web site. All images used with permission. [ Via Trend Land. ]
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On View> Detroit Disassembled, Photographs by Andrew Moore

Detroit Disassembled: Photographs by Andrew Moore Queens Museum of Art Flushing Meadows Corona Park Queens, NY Through January15 The Queens Museum of Art (QMA) presents the powerful photography of Andrew Moore from his three-month visit to Detroit from 2008 to 2009. Moore’s photographs are a tragic yet beautiful glimpse into the decline of a city that was once the twentieth century industrial heart of America. Michigan Central Station (above) stands empty, the organ screen at the United Artists Theater is crumbling, and bright green moss covers the floor of the former Ford Motor Company Headquarters. “Moore’s exquisitely realized visions of architecture overtaken by vegetation remind contemporary viewers that our own familiar culture is subject to the forces of entropy and the eternal strength of nature,” says a statement from QMA.
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On View> Unnatural Spaces: The Photography of Richard Barnes

UNNATURAL SPACES: PHOTOGRAPHY OF RICHARD BARNES The Julius Shulman Institute at Woodbury 7500 N Glenoaks Blvd. Burbank, CA Through October 22 In Unnatural Spaces, co-curators Emily Bills and Eve Schillo present the featured work of photographer Richard Barnes at the Julius Shulman Institute at the Woodbury University School of Architecture. Showcasing highlighted works from his Unabomber (1999) and Animal Logic (2009) series, the exhibit suggests that architecture is both a willing participant in, and also an unknowing target of, presentation. The show encompasses commissioned works of Barnes ranging globally from Los Angeles to Kazakhstan, and new work such as “Revel Casino Construction,” from Atlantic City (above). Barnes is a Rome Prize recipient for photography and was featured in the 2006 Whitney Biennial for his work documenting the cabin of Ted Kaczyinski. The venue, the Julius Shulman Institute, was established as a cultural destination dedicated to the promotion of photography and understanding the built environment.