Posts tagged with "Photography":

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Photographer Timothy Hursley captures neglected corners of America in new exhibit

In between photography assignments for virtuosos such as Moshe Safdie, Marlon Blackwell, and Rural Studio, Timothy Hursley takes long drives throughout the rural South and other parts of the country and aims his camera at the neglected structures and forlorn dwellings of obscure or shunned subcultures.

Hursley’s ramblings have produced several series, including his photographs of both the interiors and exteriors of the brothels of Nevada. These gentle narratives, in which the women are notably absent, bear no hint of judgment. “The photographs are stronger without people,” Hursley said. “They are like footprints of a subculture.” When Hursley stumbled upon Bobbie’s Buckeye Bar, the owner would not let him in. Left to contemplate the outside, Hursley found a composition in which the running white fence symbolized customers entering the pink brothel and “then coming out tainted red,” he explained.

Finding himself in Utah, as the trial had just begun for convicted felon Warren Jeffs, the former leader of the Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (FLDS), Hursley wondered what the architecture of polygamy looks like. An apostate brought Hursley to the FLDS cave in Hildale, Utah, a stronghold of polygamy, where he photographed the eerie interior and a new series was launched.

A quad of photos and a time-lapse video of a dilapidated silo in Hale County, Alabama, are the subject of the Oxford American video SoLost: The Beauty of a Broken Silo. Photographed from different angles, the bent and rusted structure radiates a heartrending anthropomorphism.

Closer to his home in Little Rock, Arkansas, Hursley stumbled upon two beaten-up white hearses that triggered a new fascination with the rundown funeral homes that dot the rural landscapes of the deep South. In one curiously intriguing image, Train Ride-Vicksburg, Mississippi, 2014/2016, two coffins sit on either side of a nearly room-size toy train track. For Hursley, the scene—odd, yet ordinary—is an analogy to the human condition, traveling through life to our inexorable ends.

And perhaps most curious for an artist attracted to scenes of obscurity is his series of photographs of the legendary Andy Warhol’s last factory in the early 1980s. The studio spaces were still raw at the time, recalled Hursley: “There was a lot of junk around, so I decided to roam around the space and start documenting what was there.” Eventually, Hursley enticed Warhol to come down to the cavernous space where he snapped an extraordinary photo in which a blue-jeans-and-black-turtleneck clad Warhol stands against the abstract geometry of the white space, illuminated by a distant doorway awash in an industrial shade of green.

Timothy Hursley: Tainted Lens, a solo exhibition of these and other works, is on view at the Garvey|Simon gallery in New York through June 10.

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Photographer Todd Eberle wins the Julius Shulman Institute’s 2017 Excellence in Photography Award

Burbank, California–based Woodbury University has announced that the university’s Julius Shulman Institute (JSI) will bestow the 2017 Excellence in Photography Award on acclaimed international photographer Todd Eberle. New York City–based Eberle has been Vanity Fair magazine’s Photographer at Large for over 20 years and is known widely for his “clean and analytical minimalist aesthetic,” according to a press release issued in support of the award. Eberle's work includes photographs of designs by Mies van der Rohe, Phillip Johnson, Oscar Niemeyer, Donald Judd, Le Corbusier, John Pawson, Peter Zumthor, among others. His portrait works include photographs of works by Oscar Niemeyer, Morris Lapidus, Donald Judd, Tadao Ando, Annabelle Selldorf, Herzog & de Meuron, Rem Koolhaas, David Adjaye, Peter Zumthor, Massimo and Lella Vignelli, and Dan Kiley. The university will hold an exhibition of Eberle’s work—titled Todd Eberle: Empire of Space and curated by Audrey Landreth—at Woodbury University’s Hollywood Outpost (WUHO) gallery featuring his portraits of well-known architects, including Zaha Hadid, Frank Gehry, Julius Shulman, Florence Knoll Bassett, and Phillip Johnson. The award will be presented to Eberle by architect and executive director of the JSI Barbara Bestor at a ceremony marking the occasion at WUHO Gallery.
Todd Eberle: Empire of Space Opens at WUHO May 4, 2017 Curator: Audrey Landreth May 4 to June 25, 2017 Opening Reception: May 4, 2017, 6 to 8 pm
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James Casebere explores Luis Barragán’s haptic modernism through constructed photography

American artist James Casebere is showcasing Emotional Architecture, a collection of photographs named after and inspired by the sun-bleached and platonic forms of Mexican architect Luis Barragán’s most famous works, at Sean Kelly Gallery in New York City.

The exhibition consists of constructed photography, a technique Casebere developed in the 1970s that involves constructing desk-sized architectural mock-ups and photographing those models as facsimiles of full-scale interior spaces. Casebere lights his models to highlight the spatial and emotional qualities of blank, unfurnished interiors.

For the exhibition at Sean Kelly, Casebere has mined the work of Barragán and artist Mathias Goéritz, who together appropriated color, light, and space through their own brand of modernist architecture to generate works of nuanced emotional character that stood in contrast to the era’s rigid formalism. In turn, Casebere’s constructed photography dwells on the evocative nature of these spaces. In the past, the artist has rendered works that explore the social implications of architecture—like prison cells and suburban bedrooms—and ply banal, extant spaces to thought-provoking effect.

In Emotional Architecture, Casebere investigates, among other works, a yellow corridor from Barragán’s Casa Gilardi. The Juicy Fruit–colored passage, completed in 1976 as the architect’s final work, stands in stark contrast to images made from models of Casa Barragán, a home the architect designed in Mexico City in 1947. These images—highlighting views of an empty studio, skylit vestibule, and an austere library—focus on the interplay between the formal aspects of Barragán’s architecture, its vibrant color palette, and direct light. Another series of images highlighting Barragán’s Casa Gálvez from 1952 showcases a view of a pottery-populated, bubblegum-hued courtyard.

Emotional Architecture Sean Kelly Gallery, 475 10th Avenue, New York Through March 11, 2017

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New exhibition at the Arkansas Art Center highlights the early works of Ansel Adams

Ansel Adams: Early Works, the first exhibition of Ansel Adams’s photography hosted by the Arkansas Arts Center, will showcase 41 prints done by Adams from the 1920s through the 1950s, highlighting his small-scale images. Adams was known for his photography of natural sites such as Yosemite National Park, Sequoia National Park, and the Sierra Nevadas, and this exhibition will tie into the completion of the 100th anniversary of the National Park System. According to the Arkansas Arts Center, Adams wasb a “photographer, musician, naturalist, explorer, critic, and teacher, was a giant in the field of American landscape photography. His work can be viewed as the end of an arc of American art concerned with capturing the ‘sublime’ in the unspoiled Western landscape.”

Ansel Adams: Early Works Arkansas Arts Center 501 East 9th Street, Little Rock, Arkansas Through April 16, 2017

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Visual chaos descends on a gallery in downtown Manhattan

The Gallery at Cadillac House, located just west of Soho, is hosting Toiletpaper Paradise—an exhibition that is as eccentric as it sounds. Toiletpaper Paradise invites audiences to touch, play, move, sit, recline, and position themselves in the visual antics of artist Maurizio Cattelan and photographer Pierpaolo Ferrai's curated space. The kaleidoscopic spaghetti world features over-sized stringy pasta pasted to the walls and floor joined on either side by enclaves of further obscurities enamored with space popcorn and cloud fish wallpaper. This description alone should suffice in setting the tone for the exhibit: The inclusion of risqué carpets, a life-size crocodile, tombstone, and ionic column are strangely unsurprising inclusions in their context of peculiarity. Though overwhelmed with imagery, furniture and accessories of note have been interspersed throughout the space. Despite not jumping out at you as much as the wallpaper, a range of midcentury modern furniture can be found within the setting, a feature that has led the exhibition to be dubbed "Mad Men on acid." Meanwhile, if you can spot them, works produced by Italian homeware manufacturers Gufram and Seletti are on display, all carrying with them inflections of Toiletpaper Magazine's off-beat Instagram-ready aesthetic. The exhibition was made possible through creative media agency Visionaire and Toiletpaper Magazine; Ferrari and Cattelan are co-creators of the latter. Toiletpaper Paradise runs through April 12 and is free to the public. The Gallery at Cadillac House 330 Hudson Street New York City
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New photography exhibition explores four Marcel Breuer projects from all over the world

For the Met Breuer’s first architecture exhibition, curator Beatrice Galilee has commissioned photographers Luisa Lambri and Bas Princen to revisit the iconic work of Marcel Breuer. The exhibition presents two distinct series of photographs paying homage to Breuer’s still-existing monumental modernist buildings from the 1950s and 1960s. The selected buildings include Saint John’s Abbey Church in Collegeville, Minnesota and the UNESCO headquarters in Paris which are Breuer’s first two important institutional buildings. These buildings were significant because they allowed Breuer to expand beyond what was essentially a residential practice. The IBM Research center in La Gaude, France (which is Breuer’s personal favorite) is known for its modular prefabricated concrete facade panels and distinctive double Y-shaped plan. The final building selected for the exhibition is the former Whitney Museum of American Art (now the Met Breuer). The museum is a New York City landmark known for its strong urban form as an inverted ziggurat. Lambri and Princen’s uniquely idiosyncratic approaches to the commission provide a welcoming juxtaposition of photographs. Lambri’s work documents the ephemeral experience of interior space through focused studies of light and materiality. The hexagonal screen at Saint John’s and the trapezoidal window at the Met Breuer are each documented as a series of photographs displaying the calm modulation of light over time. Princen’s dramatically large scale photographs document the post-occupancy use of buildings and their evolving relationship with nature. The sculptural, tree-like pillars at Saint John’s library are framed by a row of ordinary public library book shelves in the foreground. Upon revisiting the unoccupied IBM research center, Princen’s photos place the building within what appears to be an overgrown forest—a distinct contrast to the 1965 site which was sparsely covered by small trees. Long after Marcel Breuer’s passing in 1981, the influence of his work continues to gradually develop much like the life of buildings after they leave the drafting table. Both Lambri’s and Princen’s photos present us the opportunity to contemplate Breuer’s work unencumbered by the great modernist architect’s own intentions. Breuer Revisited: New Photographs runs through May 21, 2017, at The Met Breuer.
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Japanese photographer Sohei Nishino gets his first solo U.S. show at SFMOMA

The first solo exhibition in the United States of Japanese photographer Sohei Nishino’s work is currently on view at San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA) in New Work: Sohei Nishino. The exhibition presents a new collection of work in the photographer’s Diorama Maps photograph series. Each of the works depicts a different city explosively photographed by Nishino to be seen from above as a type of meticulously collaged and abstracted aerial view. To arrive at this final image, the artist spends months walking a city and snapping photographs that are printed and assembled by hand into a giant collage. That collage is then digitized and finally printed as a large-scale digital photograph. The high-resolution images in New Work: Sohei Nishino feature scenes from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; London; Havana; and a view of San Francisco made specifically for the exhibition.

New Work: Sohei Nishino San Francisco Museum of Modern Art 151 Third Street, San Francisco Through February 26, 2017

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Photographer Edward Burtynsky captures the abstract beauty of salt pans in India

These 31 aerial images showing the salt pans in the Little Rann of Kutch, Gujarat, India, were taken during a ten-day shooting expedition by Edward Burtynsky. They present the pans, wells, and vehicle tracks as abstract, geometric, painterly patterns: subtly colored rectangles crossed by grids of gestural lines; and yet the reality behind the ironic beauty of Burtynsky’s pictures is a harsh one. Each year 100,000 poorly paid Agariya workers toil in the pans, extracting over a million tons of salt. Furthermore, receding groundwater levels, combined with debt, diminishing market values as well as a lack of governmental support, threaten the future of this 400-year-old tradition and those lives dependent upon it. “The images in this book are not about the battles being fought on the ground,” Burtynsky wrote. “Rather, they examine this ancient method of providing one of the most basic elements of our diet; as primitive industry and as abstract two-dimensional human marks upon the landscape.”

Salt Pans by Edward Burtynsky, Steidl, $60.00.

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The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston showcases photographer who documented NYC streets for nearly 50 years

The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston will pay tribute to Helen Levitt, the American photographer known for capturing scenes of urban life in New York City. The exhibition, titled Helen Levitt: In the Street, covers her career from the late 1930s to the mid-1980s. It features more than 40 works, as well as her 1948 short film In the Street, which centered on her early photographs of children. Born and raised in Brooklyn, New York, Levitt was included in the inaugural exhibition of the photography department at the Museum of Modern Art, and she had her first of three solo shows there just three years later. By the late 1940s, Levitt had begun experimenting with the moving image, and worked full-time with film until the advent of color photography in 1959. It was then that she picked up the camera to revisit the scenes she had captured in black-and-white.

Helen Levitt: In the Street The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston 5601 Main Street, Houston Through January 2

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Studio Gang fuses storage and display in their design for a traveling photography exhibition

Studio Gang Architects, working with art advocate Project&, have produced a traveling photography exhibition that highlights the stories and photographs of 24 American workers. Studio Gang produced 18 modular display cases which double as the show’s shipping containers. The show, entitled Working in America, features the work of Pulitzer-Prize winning photographer Lynsey Addario. The opening of the show corresponds with the anniversary of Studs Terkel’s 1974 book Working, which explored similar themes. The show consists of stories and images from across the country. Studio Gang’s design features seven-foot-tall display cases that can be locked together in sets of three. These cases were developed for ease of transportation and the ability to show in difficult situations. This was important as the show will be traveling through the United States on display at public libraries. Exhibiting in libraries presents a special challenge, in that work can be displayed on the walls. “I envisioned self-crating steamer trunks that held an entire world inside, and when opened, revealed the large-scale photographs and the working lives of Americans, putting their voices and narratives at the center,” explained Jane M. Saks, the show's curator. “The team from Studio Gang not only turned that vision into a reality, but they designed the displays so that they lock together and literally hold each other up. The design is elegant and almost poetic in the way it speaks to our interdependence as workers and human beings, and the strength of all of us when we join together.” The cases are built of Baltic Birch plywood and vegetable-tanned leather for the handles. “We wanted to give visual space and dignity to each of the individuals represented in the photographs,” said Jeanne Gang. Studio Gang’s experience with exhibition design includes shows for the Art Institute of Chicago, Art Basel Miami, and the Chicago Architecture Biennial. Working in America is currently on display at Chicago’s Harold Washington Library Center, and will run through the end of January.
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Winners announced for 5th Az W Photo Award

Vienna-based museum Architekturzentrum Wien has named the winners of the fifth Az W Photo Award. The winners will be displayed for three weeks at the Architekturzentrum Wien. The theme “I ♥ Architecture” inspired a total of 252 amateur and professional photographers to submit their best images—more entrants than any of the four previous contests. John Fraser from the United Kingdom took the first prize with his image of the top of a modern shopping center emerging from the surrounding traditional Victorian neighborhood. The contest’s jury praised him for his strength of contrast:
“Within a historic context of Victorian architecture a reflective swoosh cuts its way into the Birmingham of today. The photo illustrates the transformation of an industrial town into a service industries city and opens up room for different interpretations. What do we see here? And, above all, where are we here?”
John Fraser will receive an Eames Plastic Chair from Vitra for his winning image and his photo will be on display alongside 9 entries that were shortlisted. There was an additional contest determined by voting on Facebook, won by photographer Pia Odorizzi after her photo accumulated 245 likes. Odorizzi’s photo will be displayed for two days on the 2,254 Info screens throughout Austria, which entertain more than 1.4 million viewers each week across Austria’s five regional capitals.
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An exhibition offers in-depth insight into artist Barbara Kasten’s career

The touring exhibition Barbara Kasten: Stages will arrive at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles (MOCA) this summer, following presentations at the Institute of Contemporary Art in Philadelphia and the Graham Foundation in Chicago. The exhibition collects works from four decades in the artist’s career, from the 1970s to present. Barbara Kasten: Stages is the first major survey of the artist’s work, incorporating her sculptures and photography with documentation of her artistic process. According to curator Alex Klein, “stages” refers both to the stages of the artist’s career and her own process of staging sculptures in space.

The exhibition includes many of Kasten’s most well-known photographs from the Architectural Sites series, in which she abstracted works of postmodern architecture, like Frank Gehry’s Loyola Law School using an elaborate staging of light, sculpture, and mirrors and then printed them using the dye-destruction method Cibachrome for better depth of color and clarity. Stages will also include Kasten’s work with cyanotypes, which use the same technique used to make blueprints, and her early work with furniture sculptures.

The Museum of Contemporary Art Pacific Design Center 8687 Melrose Avenue West Hollywood, CA 90069 Through August 14