Posts tagged with "Olin":

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Laurie Olin Ties it Up

In an amusing aside, landscape architect Laurie Olin discussed his bow ties on the firm's blog today. Olin briefly described the style of landscape architects. "Well, there are probably as many styles of dress for landscape architects as there are regions of the world for them to practice in," he said. And he argued that there is a time and a place for the bow tie. "There are of course clients for whom you wear blue jeans, and events where that’s completely inappropriate." Ties in general, he added, are one of the last frontiers in attire for masculine elan. "I think that because there are so few details in men’s clothing and so little ornament, that ties have become uniquely important. It’s one of the last gasps of flair and color for men. Humans respond to color, and it signals various things. It signals that, 'I’m a wild and crazy guy' or 'I’m alive' or 'I’m sensible.'"
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DS+R and OLIN To Spin Granite Web In Aberdeen

Yesterday voters in Aberdeen, Scotland narrowly approved a plan to transform Union Terrace Gardens in the heart of the city into an ambitious hybrid park and cultural center designed by Diller, Scofidio + Renfro with OLIN, according to The Scotsman. The project is estimated to cost £140 million, though Sir Ian Wood, an oil services tycoon, has pledged £50 million toward the project. Aberdeen is known as the Granite City, and the design creates a new series of granite pathways criss-crossing over the sloping site, dividing it into different programmatic zones, including an amphitheater, exhibition hall, and a number of gardens.
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A Garden for Pondering in Philadelphia

OLIN has completed a renovation of the gardens at Philadelphia's Rodin Museum, which houses the largest collection of Auguste Rodin's sculptures and objects outside of Paris. The renovation is a piece of a larger refurbishment of Benjamin Franklin Parkway, which is also being overseen by OLIN, as a part of the Philadelphia Museum of Art's Master Plan.  The renovation restores the symmetry of the gardens, originally designed by architects Paul Cret and Jacques Gréber. The Robin space is a formal French garden within the more picturesque landscape of the Parkway. The landscape architects edited the plantings to increase the visual connection to the Parkway and added plants that would emphasize the "seasonality" of the garden, according to a statement from the firm. OLIN is also adding new outdoor furniture and lighting. Sculpture will be returned to the garden and the exterior of the building, including Eve and The Age of Bronze, which will be placed in niches on the facade. Adam and The Shade will also be placed in the garden, joining The Thinker, which currently sits at just beyond the gates at the Parkway entrance.  
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Strike Two? Not So Fast

First Laurie Olin, now Frank Gehry. That was the news earlier this week when the Wall Street Journal reported that the Santa Monica-based architect had laid off "more than two dozen" staffers involved with Bruce Ratner's Atlantic Yards project. What followed was a string of cheers predicting the troubled Brooklyn mega-development's demise. After all, how could it go on without its signature architect? While considering this question, I kept thinking of a comment made by Kermit Baker yesterday, during an interview about the abysmal November billings index. Given what's going on elsewhere in the industry, the termination of a handful of architects may not signal the doomsday scenario the project's critics would like, and instead may be one more credit-related payroll pause like many others around the nation:
What we're seeing, as a result of the credit freeze, is a lot of projects, even a lot of good projects, being put on hold. Once the credit markets begin to unfreeze, though, a lot of this work will come back. You know, "Okay. We got our financing back in place, why don't you get back to work on this." It's very disconcerting because these sudden seizures can be very unexpected. It's hard to own and manage and know how to cope.
Hence the layoffs, largely unforeseen, plaguing firms nationwide, a problem we've noted before. Though Baker was not speaking specifically to the Gehry/Atlantic Yards layoffs, he said he was seeing the same sort of "payroll activity" at many of the dozens of firms he surveys to put together the billings index. The upshot to all the bad news, Baker said, is that it is possible that, as credit becomes available again, a number of projects could come back online:
There are some projects that do make sense in this economy. Obviously, the list of ones that don't make sense has gotten longer and the list of projects that do make sense has gotten shorter. But there was a time when even those projects could not get financing. I expect that to change at some point, hopefully in the near future.
And while financing could very well turn around for the project, as Baker speculates, the Observer is not so sure it will. Furthermore, the Daily News reports today that Gehry and Ratner may not be on the best of terms, as the architect has not been paid for what the paper reports are still unfinished Phase One designs. Still, the point is that, while the layoffs could be another possible death knell for Atlantic Yards, they could also simply be the economizing of one of many architects in dire straits at the moment. As for Gehry's office not returning phone calls--something the Daily News and others see as a sign that the project is faltering--don't read too much into that, either. The firm is notoriously press averse, even on the most laudatory pieces, almost never returning phone calls.