Posts tagged with "ODA":

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Flying dormers and a gridded facade in Lower Manhattan

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Celebrated as one of a handful of single-block streets in New York City, Renwick Street was once known as an historic printing district and creative area that championed both artistry and industry. New York-based ODA Architecture, the firm behind 15 Renwick Street, said the project works within the constraints of NYC’s zoning code to expand the outdoor rooftop living space of the building.
  • Facade Manufacturer NYR Building Facades
  • Architects ODA Architecture
  • Facade Installer NYR Building Facades
  • Facade Consultants Forst Consulting and Architecture, PLLC
  • Location New York, NY
  • Date of Completion 2015
  • System unitized curtain wall, curtain wall, punched windows on concrete structure
  • Products aluminum fins & window units (sourced and installed by NYR Building Facades); Zebrano 2403 aluminum inserts (profile color: sublimation wood effects); Stucco byBravo Construction (rear facade); Zahner Metal copper pre-patina sheets (“Dirty Penny” finish); Alucobond metal panels
Coining this massing strategy as a “dormer manipulation,” the architects rearranged allowable volumes of space above the setback line throughout the width of the building. This produces 15 percent more outdoor terrace space and serves twice as many units, extending across the uppermost floors of the building. As a result, the facade appears as a gridded block that fragments at the top, revealing an inner layer to the building. The architects said 15 Renwick was the first in a long line of designs that employ this massing strategy which has evolved into a common practice for their firm. The 31-unit building contains a unique mix of townhouses with private yards, penthouse duplexes, and two- and three-bedrooms. The building is composed of a typical concrete structure with added lateral bracing in the 15-foot cantilevered "flying dormer" massing. The residential units are clad with a carefully detailed unitized curtain wall system that was delivered in collaboration with NYR Building Facades who integrated design, fabrication, and installation of the facade. The unitized systems were prefabricated for each residence and transported to the site where they were quickly and easily installed. Among the most notable features of the facade are the 10-inch-deep projecting fins clad in a dark anodized aluminum. While the fins taper to a narrow width, ODA said their depth helps to provide privacy, blocking views into the units from the sidewalk. The fins feature a wood grain insert on the exterior side which produces a visually striking aesthetic. “The wood trim inserts around the aluminum windows give a warm tint to the facade and create layers of color with different sun exposures.” Beyond the dark anodized fins, copper is utilized as an accent material. ODA said the success of this project stems from the material qualities of the facade: “The integration of the hand-installed copper on the ground floor with the unitized facade system show the level of bespoke design of the facade and the richness of materials and their own requirements for detail solutions.”
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ODA brings mallcore to Brooklyn with this stacked mixed-use development

Master box-stacking architecture firm ODA has unveiled its latest addition to the Brooklyn cityscape: an eight story, mixed-used development at 71 White Street in East Williamsburg. The approximately 80,700-square-foot hotel, retail, and semi-public space will rise from the skeleton of an existing one-story, graffiti-adorned 1930s warehouse. Calling 71 White Street a mall would undermine the grittiness it strives so hard to project. Yet, its circulation pattern and its relationship to the street speaks for itself. The complex's stacked and rotated layers recede from, yet tower over, the existing low-slung street wall to create a series of insular private and public spaces. The main entrance, on the corner of McKibben and White streets, is set deep into the lot, drawing visitors though indoor and outdoor corridors to access food, drink, and entertainment. The first two floors are programmed for restaurant and retail space. Ground-floor windows would punctuate the now window-deficient facade, and create visual interest on the street. The top five floors are given over to a 112 room hotel. That hotel will provide de facto amenities: gym, rooftop bar, and pool. In addition, renderings depict multiple, expansive shared terraces that afford views of Manhattan. For those interested in people-watching, the third floor will be an open-air public promenade. To access the third floor space from the main entrance, a set of stairs slopes gently upward and diverges, giving access to the east and west ends of the structure. The circulation pattern will accommodate a range of uses: on the west end, an amphitheater slopes down to the ground floor, while the east end appears to be reserved for more quiet activities, like eating at picnic tables.
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ODA reimagines a 1900 Brooklyn factory as a modern apartment complex that nods to the area’s industrial past

The windows were broken and the steel trusses rusty by spring 2013 when architect Eran Chen got his first look inside the 1900 redbrick factory that had long stood vacant in the Dumbo section of Brooklyn. The concrete floors were dingy after decades during which the three-story structure had served as a manufacturing plant for heavy metalworking machines, household cutlery, and patterned plate glass.

Still, to Chen, founder of the New York City–based ODA (Office for Design & Architecture), which had just been tapped to help turn the 87,000-square-foot building at 51 Jay Street into a high-end residential condominium, there was a powerful authenticity to the early 20th-century structure. It spoke of a time when cargo ships still pulled up to the then-industrial enclave on the East River and railway cars rumbled about on tracks embedded in the cobblestone streets to and from factories.

The enormous skylight on the shed-like top floor called to mind the great, glorious train stations of that era, filtered with a light that Chen described as magical. He and his team of architects and designers sought to evoke the romance, if not the reality, of that bygone age in the 74-unit complex they were tasked with designing.

Figuring out how to tuck those residences into the shell of the historic structure took some finesse. ODA has considerable experience with adaptive reuse, and, as Chen knows first-hand, combining an old building and a new function is often “like mixing oil and water.” In this case the building falls within the Dumbo landmark district, so the brick perimeter walls had to be preserved, as did the large openings for the casement windows. Four new floors were built after the interior was hollowed out to accommodate an additional two stories. As a result, the floor plates were shifted, causing window heights and configurations to vary from floor to floor, and even from apartment to apartment on some floors. Nearly two thirds of the units will face the street through these windows. The rest will front a newly enlarged interior courtyard planted with a mini forest of birch trees. Atop the building will be a two-level addition, set back from the original brick structure and not visible from the street; it will contain seven penthouses, six of which are topped with large skylights inspired by the building’s original glass-paned roof.

All of the units—from a 3,000 odd square-foot penthouse, 664-square-foot studio, or the multiple sizes on offer in between—will have clean, modern layouts. Kitchens will open onto wide living rooms, some with double-height ceilings. The main living area in each apartment will have an expansive, loft-like feel.

The units’ airiness is balanced by a range of richly textured finishes and dark, substantial-looking cabinetry. To develop their materials palette, the designers researched what was considered luxury when the factory was built, and then came up with modern interpretations for 51 Jay.

Take the handsome herringbone-patterned oak floors in the living room, for example. The architects learned that herringbone floors were popular in high-end apartments at the turn of the 20th century. But instead of using four- to six-inch wood strips, as would have been done then, the architects opted for 8- and 24-inch oak strips, which, Chen explained, are more akin to the wide-plank floors found in old industrial warehouses; the wood was smoked and wire-brushed for an aged effect.

The architects also discovered that French cabinetmaking was fashionable in New York in the 1900s. The cabinets often received three coats of paint, and were then sanded at the corners to expose the underlying wood. The paneled cherry kitchen cabinets of 51 Jay will be similarly patinaed, the dark stain rubbed away at the corners to reveal the ruddiness of the wood underneath. Some of the cabinet doors will be faced with corrugated glass—more industrial-looking than traditional clear glass—a material that might well have been made in the building during the years it was a glass factory.

The same corrugated glass will appear in the master baths and will front the doors and dark-brown lacquered vanities. Copper trim will edge the vanities and medicine cabinets above—an unusual accent for a bath, but, like the corrugated glass, a material that appealed to the architects in part because it had once been produced in the building. Also unusual is the walnut-colored honed marble chosen for the floor, tub front, and vanity counter.

While many of the same materials will be used in the powder rooms, the so-called “secondary” bathrooms, which are to be found in the larger units, will have a decidedly lighter, more casual look, with whitewashed oak vanities and recessed medicine cabinets.

An avalanche of amenities are being added, including a rooftop terrace tricked out with a kitchen, fireplace, and outdoor shower. In the basement will be what has become the latest must-have for luxury residential developments: a pet washing and grooming station.

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ODA reveals Eliot Spitzer–developed stack of boxes in Williamsburg inspired by icebergs

Stacked boxes are all the architectural rage these days—from Bjarke Ingels' Two World Trade, to ODA's Midtown skyscraper, to ODA's Financial District skyscraper, to ODA's Bushwick residential project, to ODA's Williamsburg condos, to ODA's other boxy buildings in Long Island City, Harlem, and the Lower East Side. It should surprise nobody, then, that ODA's latest project will stay true to the firm's trademark form. The New York Times reported that Eliot Spitzer, the former governor and short-lived cable news host, is now heading his father's real estate business and has tapped ODA to design his first project. The $700 million, 856-unit development sits along the East River, directly south of the Williamsburg Bridge in Brooklyn. The project appears as a collection of stacked-box towers that each rise 24 stories. ODA founder Eran Chen said the design resembles a "molded iceberg." (For reference, here are some pictures of icebergs.) Along the river is also a new park and esplanade. "[Spitzer] said he decided to build rental housing rather than condominiums, and agreed to set aside 20 percent of the units for poor and working-class households," reported the Times. "But with Mayor Bill de Blasio seeking to require as much as 30 percent affordable housing for what are known as 421-a projects, Mr. Spitzer wanted to get his project moving before the current regulations changed or expired this month." This did not go over too well with some people on Team de Blasio. The Observer noted that Lincoln Restler, a senior policy advisor to the mayor, shared the Times' story on Facebook and called Spitzer's attempt to keep the project at 20 percent affordable "offensive." A spokesperson for de Blasio told the Observer that Restler's comments did not necessarily reflect the thinking of the administration. Either way, the Facebook post has been deleted.
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ODA reveals two new boxy New York City towers, each featuring an urban forest

ODA recently unveiled two major New York City projects, both of which are tall and expectedly boxy. The first is a 600-foot-tall, super-skinny tower near the United Nations. The Daily News reported that the building has “six 16-foot-high gaps in the facade—each filled with a full-floor, canopied green space that will wrap around the core of the tower.” The visual effect is a series of glass and, what appears to be, steel boxes that are suspended off the tower’s main spine. The extremely narrow structure has 2,600-square-foot floor plates, which the News points out are one-third the size of those in Vinoly’s supertall 432 Park Avenue. If the city approves the project, construction is expected to start in September and wrap up in late 2017. Just days after that project was revealed, NY YIMBY published a rendering of another ODA project in Lower Manhattan. This 229,000-square-foot tower also has a boxy aesthetic, but appears more sculptural due to the notched-out corner terraces. But most surprising about the design is the small forest that is planted on top of the building. Based on drawings, the trees would be planted behind a 12-foot parapet and grow to a height of about 40 feet. Executing this will be tricky, so we’ll just wait and see if the urban forest takes root.
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Gowanus developers shoot down ziggurat-themed proposal from ODA

Last week, ODA: Architecture unveiled a dramatic rendering of a megaproject for Gowanus, Brooklyn, featuring a cluster of semi-transparent stepped pyramids. But almost as soon as the design was released, the site's owners stepped in as buzzkills, disavowing any connection with the ODA proposal. After the sleuths at 6sqft identified the future home of the ziggurats as 175–225 Third Street—thanks to a bit of graffiti pictured in the renderings—the owners, Kushner Companies and LIVWRK, released a statement indicating that they had already passed on ODA's pitch. "The developers are not working with ODA on this project and these designs do not represent our vision for this site or the Gowanus," they said. "We are committed to putting forth an outstanding plan that respects the context of the neighborhood and responds to the voices of local stakeholders." While we now know that ODA, which is currently working on other New York City projects including 10 Montieth Street in Bushwick, will not be bringing their pinwheel of Mesopotamian-inspired structures to the canal front, much about the future of the site remains uncertain. Last June, The Real Deal reported that the parcel could be rezoned to allow a mixed-use development of over one million square feet, to include 150,000 square feet of retail. The immediate area is ripe for commercial growth, with a Whole Foods located across the street and other large residential complexes going up nearby.
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ODA’s jewel-like facade in DUMBO clears Landmarks hurdle on second try

  The New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission has given its blessing to ODA's jewel-like faceted facade for a factory-to-condo conversion on the Dumbo waterfront. The firm first presented its plans for 10 Jay Street last month, and while it was well received, commissioners didn't think the dramatic, glassy design was a perfect fit for the historic neighborhood.   So the firm took that into account and added more steel and brick elements into its design. And with that—permission was granted. Curbed reported that the sugar crystal-design of the facade was inspired by the building's history as a sugar refinery. The commission had previously approved ODA's plans to restore the building's other three sides. Check out the fly-through below to get a better sense of the design—albeit, the earlier version of the design. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hlLQ6DLy44c According to the Real Deal, demolition is slated to start May 1 and completion is planned for Fall 2016.
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ODA unveils amenity-packed zigzagging rental building in Bushwick

ODA has unveiled renderings for a massive new residential complex in Bushwick, Brooklyn—and it certainly reminds us of Bjarke Ingels’ 8 House in Copenhagen with its doughnut-like shape and landscaped roof that dips toward the street. At nearly 400,000 square feet, ODA’s 10 Montieth Street will become a major piece in the redevelopment of the Rheingold Brewery site.   The 392-unit rental building is quite obviously geared toward younger tenants that have been flocking to the neighborhood in recent years. Above the building’s apartments—most of which are studios or one-bedrooms—is that 25,000-square-foot roof, which packs more amenities than a three-day Carnival Cruise. According to the Real Deal, 10 Montieth’s zigzagging roof has a “running/hiking course, urban farming areas and an outdoor cross-training facility.” There is also apparently a “chill space” and some graffiti walls so renters can take the edge off if urban farming isn’t going as planned. They could also probably use the 19,000-square-foot courtyard as a “chill space.” Good to have options. The building’s protruding volumes and balconies give it the boxy design aesthetic we have come to expect from ODA. The geometric exterior is primarily clad in light gray stone or concrete and has pronounced orange window frames. ODA adds contrast to the project by using darker materials on the sections of the building that are set back from the street.