Posts tagged with "Museums":

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Eavesdrop> Tom Tom Club: What’s up with Tom Wiscombe’s futuristic Los Angeles venue?

Architect Tom Wiscombe and developer Tom Gilmore have been spotted on more than one occasion imbibing at Redbird, the restaurant located in the former rectory of the cathedral of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Los Angeles. (Gilmore is the landlord.) Does this mean that the pair’s plans for Old Bank District Museum, a futuristic art venue designed by Wiscombe, is on track for a 2017 opening? Only the bartender knows.
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Herzog & de Meuron Reveals Renderings for New Vancouver Art Gallery

After years of planning, the Vancouver Art Gallery revealed renderings for its new home by Swiss firm Herzog & de Meuron this Tuesday. The conceptual design is a striking departure for a city of tall, slim towers, but an ongoing motif for the firm.  Concept images depict wood and glass clad cantilevered boxes of varying sizes hovering over downtown Vancouver. The new project would fill in what is now a parking lot several blocks east from the current museum. Vancouver urban planners are frequently recognized for embracing both density and nature—and the design for the new museum building also seeks to unite the two. In the renderings, the vertical museum—topping out at seven stories—rises from a public 40,000-square-foot garden courtyard. The expansion would create 85,000 square feet of galleries, including an admissions-free ground level and a seventh-floor terrace displaying sculptures. There are also plans for an education center, a theater, a library, as well as a cafe, bringing the new space to a grand total of 310,000 square feet. There would also be room to grow vertically in the future. “It is so vertically dominated, this city, that to do a museum [that] would only stay on the ground – you couldn’t do it. You have to explore the height which is so much a topic of this city," Christine Binswanger, senior partner at Herzog & de Meuron told the Canadian newspaper, The Globe and Mail. The city is leasing the land for the new building to the Vancouver Art Gallery. The estimated cost for the project: $350 million—to be achieved through a mix of private and public funding, with an expected opening in 2021.
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On View> MoMA presents “Endless House: Intersections of Art and Architecture”

Endless House: Intersections of Art and Architecture Museum of Modern Art The Robert Menschel Architecture and Design Gallery 11 West 53rd Street, New York Through March 6, 2016 The Museum of Modern Art pays homage to the single-family home in Endless House: Intersections of Art and Architecture, a rich exhibition comprised of photographs, drawings, video, installations, and architectural models from MoMA’s collection. It showcases the artistic endeavors of both architects and artists alike with works that span seven decades. Intriguing house designs—ranging from historical projects by Mies van der Rohe, Frank Gehry, Peter Eisenman, and Rem Koolhaas, to new acquisitions from Smiljan Radic and Asymptote Architecture—are juxtaposed with visions from artists such as Louise Bourgeois, Bruce Nauman, Mario Merz, and Rachel Whiteread. The inspiration for the exhibit’s name is Frederick Kiesler’s "Endless House," shown in the 1960 MoMA show Visionary Architecture. Courtesy MoMA
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Cesar Pelli announces he will design a new South Asian Museum in downtown Dallas

On the heels of designing Dallas’s McKinney & Olive tower, his first in the city, Cesar Pelli snagged a competitive proposal as the architect of the Shraman South Asian Museum and Learning Center. The new museum will be located at the corner of Woodall Rodgers Freeway and Field Street in downtown Dallas. Specific details on the museum have yet to be released, but it will be the first museum in the United States exclusively devoted to South Asia; much of the collection will be focused on India. Although Pelli is best known for building some of the tallest towers in the world, the museum is not intended to be a skyscraper, but rather a new cultural addition to the burgeoning area. The proposed 4.7-acre site will be a few blocks away from the Perot Museum of Nature and Science and the not-yet-completed Victory Park complex, making it one of several exciting new additions to the neighborhood.
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Gluckman Tang’s $24 million renovation of the Staten Island Museum opens after a decade

Ten years in the making, the renovation of one of Staten Island's oldest buildings—part of the Staten Island Museum expansion—is finally complete. Well, almost. Stepping into the refurbished Cultural Center building just off of Staten Island's seafront, the smell of fresh paint still hangs lightly in the air as designers and the team behind the project apply the final touches to Gluckman Tang Architects' (formerly Gluckman Mayner) design. Originally used by sailors, the 1879 landmarked 'Building A' at Snug Harbor follows the Greek Revival style of the adjacent structures. So far, it has taken ten years from proposal to opening, and four years to construct, at a cost of $24.4 million. Speaking to AN, James Young-Suk Lim, of New York–based Gluckman Tang, told of the difficulties they had in creating "acceptable climate conditions" for the galleries. "The project was unique as we had to keep so much due to the building's status as a national landmark," he said. The building was actually one of the first to be given landmark status by New York's Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC). Despite gutting the 18,000-square-foot building, opening it up for gallery use, Gluckman Tang appropriately employed a subtle design approach to the interior. During this process, load-bearing walls were replaced by structural columns, creating an open feel and giving visitors more space to explore. Much of the inside is white meanwhile fire-proof doors use frame fitting glass panes. The technique visually invites people into the galleries and continues to open up circulation spaces that would otherwise be empty voids. This minimalist approach also gave the museum and exhibition designers greater freedom and flexibility to adapt the space. In this instance, the exhibition design by Ralph Appelbaum Associates (also from New York) employs a similar minimalist glass strategy and complements the work by Gluckman Tang. Walls have been painted pastel green, creating an air of calmness and tranquility, with the subtle color change acting as a visual threshold between the gallery and circulation spaces. Keeping the temperature at 70 degrees and at 50 percent relative humidity (a museum requirement) was always going to be a tough task given the mandate to maintain certain historical elements of the building, notably the 19th century windows and window frames. Consequently, a new building envelope was created inside the existing structure. The architects installed floor-to-ceiling windows with Low E soft coatings that were recessed from the original bays. The windows act as a "vapor barrier," yet allow users to still view old windows. Translucent pull down blinds shade the art from damaging sunlight, while soft interior lighting modules placed along rails in the ceiling enhance the display. This feature allows the circulatory spaces that are not bound by daylight regulations to become brighter, amplifying the threshold existing between the spaces. In addition to this, the building is also a LEED Gold project. Some 18 geothermal energy piles were drilled 499 feet (500 feet requires mining permission) to provide energy to the building, of which the majority will be used for climate control. The latest addition to the Staten Island Museum will feature a diverse range of cultural and historical artifacts ranging from fish fossils to art from the island. The inaugural exhibitions will be open to the public on Saturday, September 19 at 10:00a.m.
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MAD reveals slimmed-down Lucas Museum on the Chicago lakeshore

The PR team boosting the George Lucas Museum today unveiled new renderings of the Star Wars filmmaker's high-profile and controversial proposal to turn a swath of land on Chicago's lakefront into a gallery for Lucas' art collection, digital art and movie memorabilia. The Lucas Museum of Narrative Art is contested, however, by open space advocates who say it amounts to a giveaway of public land for private use. That debate rages on, although the revised plans (officially a lease agreement between the Chicago Park District and the museum) appear to jeopardize a court case that sought to undo the deal minted by Mayor Rahm Emanuel. Illinois' state legislature has also passed a law since the suit was filed, stating that the city can legally build facilities on parkland, including "formerly submerged land," apparently sinking the chances of a federal suit filed by Friends of the Parks. In addition to all that legal maneuvering, the furor may have encouraged a more approachable design. The new building will have 25 percent less square footage than originally planned, and nearly 4.6 acres of new parkland where a surface parking lot now lies (that component was always a feature of the proposal, but until now was given little detail). Windows now pepper the terrestrial swell of a building that MAD first offered, hoping for allusions to rolling hills and dunes—but getting "Jabba the Hutt" instead. (Courtesy Lucas Museum of Narrative Art) Still many, including the Chicago Tribune's Blair Kamin, are bristling at an opaque process for developing precious downtown lakefront property owned by the Chicago Park District. Kamin said the new renderings "did not satisfy":
Is this stretch of the lakefront about to become an intergalactic architectural petting zoo, more notable for futuristic structures than the prized public space they occupy? ... After months of controversy, including a federal lawsuit filed by Friends of the Parks, you'd think that the Lucas camp would have addressed such issues. But no. Only after a day of pestering from me did it release a single ground-level rendering. And that one, while alluring enough, simply presents a view from the museum's outdoor plaza looking back at the museum and its flashy, halo-like observation deck and restaurant.
Lead designers MAD Architects, the Beijing-based firm of Ma Yansong, are working with Chicago’s VOA Associates on the museum, as well as Studio Gang and SCAPE Landscape Architecture, who are tackling the lakefront project's landscape component. The critically lauded Chinese firm unveiled its first project in the United States earlier this year8600 Wilshire, an 18-unit residential complex in Los Angeles. (Read AN's feature on Chinese designers remaking American landscapes here.)
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Behind the Veil: The Broad opens September 20

When The Broad opens to the public on September 20, Angelenos will finally get to see how Diller Scofidio + Renfro’s design compliments philanthropists Eli and Edythe Broad’s powerhouse collection of 2,000 pieces of contemporary art in their eponymous museum. Works by Ed Ruscha and Cindy Sherman will hang in the 35,000-square-foot, column-free gallery space lit by some 300 skylights. Expectations are high for the $140 million dollar building, but from what we’ve seen and heard, the architecture is refined and detail-oriented. Or, as DS+R architect Kevin Rice said of Eli Broad, “I’ve never worked with another billionaire so interested in bathroom fixtures.” While the opening of a new building is always a thrill, AN has been tracking this feat of design, engineering, and curatorial might almost since its inception and we thought we’d share some of the highlights along the way. Screen Shot 2015-09-15 at 3.06.06 PM Q+A> KEVIN RICE Architectural journalist Sam Lubell spoke with DS+R's Kevin Rice and got a behind-the-scenes preview of the museum. He asked Rice about design goals for the adjacent public space. “The last thing we wanted was another dead corporate plaza that gets filled at lunchtime and has tumbleweeds flying around the rest of the time,” said Rice. “We wanted something that people would want to come back to throughout the day.” director talks Q+A> BROAD ART FOUNDATION DIRECTOR TALKS ARCHITECTURE, OPENING DATE FOR DS+R’S LOS ANGELES MUSEUM Late last year, AN talked with Broad Art Foundation Director Joanne Heyler to learn how the arts community was reacting to the new architecture. “The building is very sculptural because the Vault form [which contains the museum’s collection] creates the heart of the building,” said Heyler. “I’ve taken artists to see the collection inside and gotten an incredibly enthusiastic response.” rendering COMMENT: ARCHITECTURE IS NOT ENOUGH AT GRAND AVENUE “No amount of architecture will transform Bunker Hill,” said architecture critic and curator Greg Goldin in his comment that drew attention to the lackluster urban condition along Grand Avenue. While Eli Broad has an ambition to make the street into a boulevard, Goldin questions redevelopment efforts going back decades that have wiped out topography and displaced population. “Broad’s obsession with having architects strut their stuff has obscured the need for a considered response to the city itself—with varied program and a welcoming streetscape—not one street-top civic center,” he wrote. rem HERE’S REM KOOLHAAS’ “FLOATING” RUNNER-UP PROPOSAL FOR LOS ANGELES’ BROAD MUSEUM Lastly, why not show OMA’s similar, but not winning proposal? Rem Koolhaas’s firm proposed a “floating” box covered in a lacy-patterned metal screen and cantilevered via steel brace frames above Grand Avenue.
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One of these two first prize winners will build the new Bauhaus Museum in Dessau, Germany

In August in Dessau, Germany, a jury in the design competition for the construction of the Bauhaus Museum awarded two first prizes. By a majority vote, the joint winners are from New York and Barcelona with third and fourth place teams hailing from Zürich and Toronto. The design to be constructed from the shortlist of two is yet to be selected. According to the Bauhaus, the competition has shown that the museum typology is in a transitional phase. “The vertical is over—a new theme is flexibility," Chris Dercon, Director of the Tate Modern in London and one of the material prize jurors, said in a statement. "However, the new development has no clear direction. The two first prizewinners are very diverse. It will be a chance to start the discussion in the international public and with experts. To be the beginning of the New, Dessau and the Bauhaus are ideal places. This is exciting.” The winners were: Architects: Young & Ayata Michael Young, Kutan Ayata New York Landscape architect: Misako Murata New York Architects: Gonzalez Hinz Zabala Roberto González Peñalver, José Zabala Rojí, Anne Katharina Hinz Barcelona, Spain Landscape architect: Roser Vives de Delás Barcelona, Spain Third Place: Architects: Berrel Berrel Kräutler AG Maurice Berrel Zurich, Switzerland Landscape architect: ASP Landschaftsarchitekten AG Florian Seibold Zurich, Switzerland Fourth Place: Architects: Ja Architecture Studio Nima Javidi Toronto, Canada Landscape architects: JA Architecture Studio Behnaz Assadi Toronto, Canada Both joint winners will receive $36,800 in prize money while the third and fourth place teams will take home $20,100 and $12,300 respectively. The Bauhaus staid that it felt reinforced by its decision to have the competition open for international entries as Claudia Perren, Director and CEO of the Bauhaus Dessau Foundation and building contractor, stated that it is a "first-class competition.” The idea was also conceived to "offer young offices and international architects a real chance" which has no doubt been taken—the competition received over 800 entries.  
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Beyer Blinder Belle restoring Marcel Breuer’s Whitney building for 2016 reopening under the Metropolitan Museum

The Met Breuer will throw open its doors in March 2016 for the first season of contemporary art programming under the banner of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Breuer's iconic building, formerly the Whitney Museum of American Art, is currently being "invigorated by renovations that will support a fluid, integrated experience of art and architecture," as the Met's press release proudly declares. The renovation seeks to integrate art throughout the entire museum. Immediately upon entering, visitors will be greeted by artist-in-residence Vijay Iyer, who will be conducting a performance installation. It's a short elevator ride up to four additional floors of "contemporary art in dialogue with historic works" in the Met's collection. “The Met is proud to become the steward of this iconic building and to preserve Marcel Breuer’s bold vision,” said Thomas P. Campbell, director and CEO of the Met, said in a statement. “Our approach to inhabiting and interpreting the building honors Breuer’s intent for the space, highlighting its unique character as an environment for the presentation of modern and contemporary art. The wonderfully scaled galleries and interior spaces of The Met Breuer provide a range of opportunities to present our modern and contemporary program, in addition to our galleries in the Fifth Avenue building.” Beyer Blinder Belle is spearheading the restoration efforts, including touching up Breuer's distinct concrete walls, stone floors, bronze fixtures, and lighting. The architects are working hard to preserve the building's weathered patina rather than scrubbing and polishing its history away. A streamlined entry sequence, new restaurant, sunken garden, and "book bar" retail shop are also planned. "What should a museum look like, a museum in Manhattan?" Breuer asked in 1963 upon receiving the commission to design the new Whitney. "It is easier to say first what it should not look like. It should not look like a business or office building, nor should it look like a place of light entertainment. Its form and its material should have identity and weight in the neighborhood of 50-story skyscrapers, of mile-long bridges, in the midst of the dynamic jungle of our colorful city. It should be an independent and self-relying unit, exposed to history, and at the same time it should transform the vitality of the street into the sincerity and profundity of art." The inaugural showing includes free entry to the lobby and lower-level galleries. According to the Met:
The inaugural season of The Met Breuer features a major cross-departmental curatorial initiative to present a historic examination of unfinished works of art; the largest exhibition to date dedicated to Indian modernist Nasreen Mohamedi; and a month-long performance installation, by Artist in Residence Vijay Iyer. Upcoming exhibitions include a presentation of Diane Arbus’s rarely seen early photographic works (July 11– November 27, 2016), and the first museum retrospective dedicated to Kerry James Marshall (October 25, 2016 – January 22, 2017).
The building has been vacant since the Whitney decamped for its new Renzo Piano–designed Meatpacking outpost perches astride the High Line. Meanwhile Uptown, Richard Morris Hunt's grand Beaux Arts beauty is in the midst of a conceptual plan by David Chipperfield Architects that will eventually guide the redesign of the complex's Southwest Wing.
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Gluckman Mayner reportedly designing new Global Contemporary Collection & Museum in the Berkshires

The beautiful rolling landscape of Northwestern Massachusetts has been the home to important academic institutions for over 100 years. But in the past thirty years it has also become the home of major art museums, including Williams College Museum of Art, the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art (MASS MoCA), and, just down the road, the Clark Art Institute. Now the Berkshire Eagle newspaper and local magazine iberkshires.com are reporting that another important art museum may be located in the region. Thomas Krens—the man behind MASS MoCA—is proposing the creation of 160,000 square foot art gallery on the grounds of the local airport. The Eagle reported that Krens proposed the new museum would “be privately owned by a for-profit group of investors and cost an estimated $10 million to $15 million." It would be called the Global Contemporary Collection & Museum and have a collection of about 400 works of art. The museum is only in the early planning stages, but Krens claimed to have been working on its formation for many years. He originally proposed the idea for a site in China. Now, the idea has approval from the airport commission to enter into negotiations with Krens to study its feasibility. The paper also reported that Richard Gluckman of Gluckman Mayner Architects has done the early schematic drawings for the project. The museum would be located in an industrial area, next to the local Stop & Shop and adjacent to the airport runway. Krens was quoted in iberkshires.com saying that the concept for the museum is for it to be “super sophisticated, super inexpensive but elegant industrial architecture, something Richard Gluckman specializes in.” If the project comes to fruition, it will join MASS MoCA’s elegant 1995 Bruner/Cott Architects factory renovation and a 2014 Tadao Ando (with Selldorf Architects) addition at the Clark as important architectural projects in the area.
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Now open to the public, Zaha Hadid’s Italian Messner Museum is literally built inside a mountaintop

Zaha Hadid's Messner Mountain Museum Corones is perched 7,464 feet above sea level. The museum itself is embedded within Mount Kronplatz as if it was violently speared through the peak to overlook the breathtaking Dolomites region in the Italy. And you you can see the stunning views yourself now that the museum has officially opened to the public. The predominantly subterranean construction encouraged by Hadid was intended to allow the smooth, computer-drafted building to blend and contrast with the mountain's jagged rock. With only the cement-based entrance exposed, the museum resembles a singular, enormous climbing wall hand hold that, because of its natural color, is paired well alongside the mountain landscape inviting climbers to ascend to the peak. Said to represent the “supreme discipline of mountaineering,” the museum is one of six dedicated to the legendary mountaineer and explorer Reinhold Messner, who is known to be the first climber to ascend all fourteen "eight-thousanders" and the first to summit Everest without supplemental oxygen. Each Messner Museum commemorates not only his accomplishments as a mountaineer but more importantly honors mountain culture overall. Exhibits differ at each location, ranging from film to Dolomite paintings to relics representing those that shaped alpine history. Generally located in South Tyrol and Belluno, Italy, the first five museums are open to the general public. The MMM Corones opened its doors on Friday, July 24th.
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Ennead unveils $200 million expansion plan for Peabody Essex Museum

The Peabody Essex Museum (PEM) in Salem, Massachusetts has unveiled its Ennead Architects–designed expansion that it will build as part of a $650 million "Advancement Campaign." Along with $200 million for new facilities, the campaign allocates $350 toward its endowment, and $100 million to improve existing infrastructure on the museum's campus. Ennead's plan for PEM is based on original work created by Rick Mather, the celebrated architect who passed away in 2013. The expansion includes a new 40,000-square-foot, three-story wing for galleries that is slated to break ground in 2016 and open three years later. The museum is also constructing an 80,000-square-foot off-site building for the Collection Stewardship Center that is designed by Schwartz/Silver Architects and is also scheduled to open in 2019. "A design highlight of the expansion will be the renovation of the west facade of the museum’s founding structure, East India Marine Hall," said the museum in a statement. "This National Historic Landmark will be given renewed prominence with the creation of an adjacent two-story glass atrium that will offer fresh perspectives on this iconic building." PEM says it holds the "largest historic architecture collection among US art museums" noting that four of its 22 structures are National Historic Landmarks and another six are listed on the National Register of Historic Places.