Posts tagged with "Museum of Fine Arts Houston":

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Steven Holl’s Glassell School of Art is clad with 178 unique precast panels

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Earlier this year, the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston (MFAH) opened the new Glassell School of Art, the nation’s only museum-affiliated art school serving pre-K through postgraduate students. The Steven Holl Architects-designed project is the first building in a 14-acre development that will reshape the museum’s campus. It joins other buildings on the campus designed by Ludwig Mies Van Der Rohe, Rafael Moneo, and Carlos Jimenez. The design has an L-shaped plan with a sloping, walkable roofline running the length of the building.
 
  • Facade Manufacturer Gate Precast Company (precast concrete panels), Admiral Glass Company (glazing)
  • Architects Steven Holl Architects, Kendall Heaton Associates (associate architect)
  • Facade Installer Gate Precast Company (precast concrete panels), Admiral Glass Company (glazing)
  • Facade Consultants Knippers Helbig Advanced Engineering
  • Location Houston
  • Date of Completion 2018
  • System Structural precast concrete panels, insulated glazing unit
  • Products Gate Precast Company precast concrete panels, Cristacruva IGU with Guardian SN 62/34 sunguard on Guardian clear glass, Kawneer zero sightline vents
The facade of the Glassell School consists of monumental precast concrete panels tied together with cast-in-place concrete plank beams with glazed infill panels between. There are 178 unique precast panel shapes. They all reference the same 11-degree angle seen in the slope of the roof. This shows up with variations in each panel to create the facade’s unique look. Originally, the project team designed a system of only precast panels, but this created challenging connection details, so they opted for cast-in-place beams to connect the panels. These beams were cast with vertically-projected rebar that each precast panel mounted onto. The panels were fitted with sleeves at the base and the top to receive the rebar from the beams. This required a great amount of precision in the fabrication of the panels to align the sleeves with the rebar. It took immense coordination between the architects, the concrete contractor casting the beams, and the precast fabricator, Gate Precast Company. The architects, along with the client, chose to cast the concrete using a color that references the Indiana limestone used in the surrounding buildings on the campus. The cast-in-place beams were cast in a similar white concrete to match the precast concrete as closely as possible. The interior of the building is mostly art studios, which called for indirect daylighting. Steven Holl Architects delivered this through the use of two different glazing systems integrated within the facade. Alternating between the precast concrete structure there are expansive insulated glazing units (IGUs) with a translucent polyvinyl butyral (PVB) interlayer. This assembly was designed to mitigate solar gain and save energy while allowing the interior to be fully illuminated. The translucent glass also creates a glowing effect for the building's exterior at night. In addition to the IGUs, each studio space has a small three-foot-by-three-foot operable vent with clear glazing that allows for an exterior view.
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Immersive LED installation by artist Pipilotti Rist goes on view at Museum of Fine Arts, Houston

After a smashing success as part of a retrospective of visual and multimedia artist Pipilotti Rist at New York’s New Museum, Pixel Forest and Worry Will Vanish were acquired by the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. The Swiss artist created Pixel Forest with lighting designer Kaori Kuwabara, constructing thousands of hanging jewel-toned LED lights that shift in waves of color. Worry Will Vanish is a projected video that occupies a corner of the room and takes the viewer through dreamy nature scenes and distorted views of the human body. Conceived separately but displayed together, the immersive experience transports the viewer into Rist’s world.

Pipilotti Rist: Pixel Forest and Worry Will Vanish Museum of Fine Arts, Houston 1001 Bissonnet, Houston Through September 17

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Ground breaks on Steven Holl’s design for the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston

Steven Holl's design for the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston (MFAH) has started construction. In 2015, Holl described the commission as "the most important" of his career.

Steven Holl Architects was awarded the job back in 2012, seeing off competition from Morphosis and Snøhetta, but working out the design has been a drawn-out experience. “What you see here is the culmination of a 36-month design process,” Holl said at a design unveiling two years ago. In addition to the 165,000-square-foot Nancy and Rich Kinder Building, and the Glassell School of Art, the architect also worked on the museum's master plan.

The 14-acre campus will also include the Sarah Campbell Blaffer Foundation Center for Conservation, designed by Lake|Flato Architects of San Antonio. The two-storey facility will sit above MFAH's existing parking garage and provide conservation labs and studios, and a street-level cafe. Holl's translucent Nancy and Rich Kinder Building, meanwhile, will see two floors of galleries circling a top-lit three-level atrium added along with a restaurant, theater, reflecting pools, vertical gardens, meeting rooms, and underground parking.

The building will have etched glass tubular cladding that will allow daylight to filter through and also give the building a soft glow come sunset. At ground level, six reflecting pools of water will amplify the luminous qualities of the structure's skin, which will also include seven vertical gardens. These will be cut into segments of vision glass instead of the translucent tubing. Inside, the two galleries will total 54,000 square feet. The upper level is to be shielded by a luminous canopy roof, which has concave curves inspired by Texas' billowing clouds. All of the gallery spaces feature natural light. Holl is working with New York–based lighting design firm L’Observatoire International on the project.

Furthermore, Holl's new Glassell School of Art will connect with the water pools and connect the campus to The Brown Foundation, Inc. Plaza. All in all, MFAH's additions will come to $450 million. Construction is touted for completion in 2019.
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The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston showcases photographer who documented NYC streets for nearly 50 years

The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston will pay tribute to Helen Levitt, the American photographer known for capturing scenes of urban life in New York City. The exhibition, titled Helen Levitt: In the Street, covers her career from the late 1930s to the mid-1980s. It features more than 40 works, as well as her 1948 short film In the Street, which centered on her early photographs of children. Born and raised in Brooklyn, New York, Levitt was included in the inaugural exhibition of the photography department at the Museum of Modern Art, and she had her first of three solo shows there just three years later. By the late 1940s, Levitt had begun experimenting with the moving image, and worked full-time with film until the advent of color photography in 1959. It was then that she picked up the camera to revisit the scenes she had captured in black-and-white.

Helen Levitt: In the Street The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston 5601 Main Street, Houston Through January 2

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Yayoi Kusama crafts a surreal experience for visitors to the Museum of Fine Arts Houston

On show until September 18th at the Museum of Fine Arts Houston are two visually intense, immersive environments courtesy of Japanese contemporary artist Yayoi Kusama. The space is lined with mirrors to amplify the experience, a feature with which Kusama has become synonymous. The play of light and sculpture is set against a black background creates the impression of being in outer space. Kusama: At the End of the Universe also features a sculpted fiberglass polka-dot pumpkin and a selection of the artist’s paintings; the showpieces of the exhibition are two infinity rooms. The two rooms are titled Aftermath of Obliteration of Eternity and Love Is Calling. The former is more focused on the interplay of light, showcasing the artist’s intrigue with “the intangible” while the latter offers a more direct dialogue with the visitor and the spatial environment through physical forms. Yayoi Kusama At the End of the Universe Museum of Fine Arts Houston 1001 Bissonnet, Houston Through September 18
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On View> “Soto: The Houston Penetrable” Suspends 24,000 Tubes in Kinetic Display

Soto: The Houston Penetrable Museum of Fine Arts, Houston 1001 Bissonnet Through September 1, 2014 The final installation in Jesús Rafael Soto’s Penetrables series—Houston Penetrable—will be on view at The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, as of May 8. An interactive display of 24,000 PVC tubes, each hand painted and tied, will hang from the second story of the museum’s Cullinan Hall. The strands’ collective visual expression is of a floating yellow orb visible upon a transparent background. The installation’s kinetic quality defies the idea that viewers look only with their eyes. The interaction of museum visitors playing with and among the strands is, in fact, the final element that completes Soto’s work. The installation, which took almost a decade to finish, is one of the few that Soto created for the indoors. The piece will be accompanied by a neighboring exhibition of eight other pieces that exemplify the artist’s career, including Plexiglas boxes, and selections from his Agujas (Needles), Vibraciones (Vibrations), and Ambivalencias (Ambivalences) series.
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On View> Beyond Craft at the Museum of Fine Arts Houston

Beyond Craft Museum of Fine Arts Houston 1001 Bissonnet, Houston Through May 26 The Leatrice S. and Melvin B. Eagle Collection is one of the most remarkable decorative arts collections in the world, and goes a long way toward challenging the idea that there is a difference between decorative and high art. Although primarily American in scope, it also encompasses significant pieces by acclaimed international artists. At its core are stunning examples of ceramics by groundbreaking California-based artists, such as Robert Arneson, Ralph Bacerra, Viola Frey, David Gilhooly, Ron Nagle, Ken Price, Adrian Saxe, and Peter Voulkos. Also included is furniture by Wendell Castle and Sam Maloof; textile and fiber art by Olga de Amaral, John Garrett, John McQueen, and Cynthia Schira; and jewelry and metalwork by William Harper, Albert Paley, Earl Pardon, and Joyce J. Scott. The Museum of Fine Arts Houston acquired the collection in 2010. Beyond Craft represents its first major showing, surveying significant artists, aesthetic principles, and art movements from the mid-1960s to the early 1990s and beyond.
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On View> “Roads of Arabia” Exhibition on Saudi Arabian Archaeology Opens December 19 in Houston

Roads of Arabia: Archaeology and History of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia The Museum of Fine Arts Houston 5601 Main Street Houston, Texas December 19 through March 9, 2014 The Museum of Fine Arts Houston (MFAH) is hosting an eye-opening exhibition this winter that will uncover the rich history of the ancient trade routes of the Arabian Peninsula. Organized by the Smithsonian’s Arthur M. Sackler Gallery in Washington, D.C., in association with the Saudi Commission for Tourism and Antiquities (SCTA), Roads of Arabia will feature objects recently excavated from more than 10 archaeological sites, and give insight into the culture and economy of this ancient civilization. Recently discovered objects along the trade routes include alabaster bowls and fragile glassware as well as heavy gold earrings and monumental statues. All of the artifacts are testament to the lively exchange between Arabs and their neighbors, including the Egyptians, Syrians, Babylonians, and Greco-Romans.
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Steven Holl’s Houston Unification

The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston announced today that architect Steven Holl was selected to build a new building on a two-acre parking lot in the city's Museum District, besting Morphosis and Snøhetta. Situated among other structures by Mies van der Rohe, Raphael Moneo, and a sculpture garden by Isamu Noguchi, Holl's building dedicated to art after 1900 will help unify the campus. According to MFAH Director Gary Tinterow, "Everyone on the committee was deeply impressed by the intelligence and beauty of their museum projects, and we feel certain that they will conceive a design that will match the clarity and elegance of our existing architectural landmarks."