Posts tagged with "Morris Adjmi":

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Archtober Building of the Day #2> Morris Adjmi’s 250 Bowery

Archtober Building of the Day #2 250 Bowery 250 Bowery, New York, NY Morris Adjmi Architects and AA Studio Winner of a 2014 AIA New York Chapter Merit Award, 250 Bowery is the latest insertion into the parade of Pritzker Prize–winners on the Bowery. Morris Adjmi Architects Project Architect Mohammed Rajab led our group of enthusiasts and developers from Canada—yes, friends, you can use Archtober to suss out your competition—through a private duplex luxury condo currently on the market. New York City is the world capital of real estate, and here’s one of the reasons why. With a very sophisticated facade of nine square window grids, overlaid by a composite secondary system—a pattern of clad columns and spandrels in quadrants, adding up again to a larger scale nine square—the visible upper facade is both industrial in feeling and sophisticated in scale, texture, and geometry. It fits right in, while at the same time offering a scalar bump reflecting the new institutional geography of the Bowery. Dominating the views from within the units is SANAA’s New Museum and Foster + Partners’ Sperone Westwater Gallery. Great design sells. In preparation for today’s outing, I took a look at the special language of residential real estate. We have a “sleek, gleaming, sundrenched home beckoning with robust casement windows” (they are actually hopper windows),  and a “scintillating silhouette.”  I’m here to tell you that it’s a very handsome building, but it’s boxy—and I mean boxy, with its nuanced play of multiple grids on the facade. There is a complement of tenant outdoor space, with nice downtown views and a motorized opener on the trash door in the common hallway. “Look – no hands” recycling! The transformation of the Bowery continues. The International Center of Photography is moving down there, too. When CBGB’s can become a John Varvatos store, and the former flophouses of Skid Row can fetch upwards of $2,500 per square foot, you see change every day. The birth and rebirth of a constantly evolving city is hastened by the presence of such high quality design leading the way. authorPhoto Cynthia Phifer Kracauer, AIA, is the Managing Director of the Center for Architecture and the festival director for Archtober:  Architecture and Design Month NYC.  She was previously a partner at Butler Rogers Baskett, and from 1989-2005 at Swanke Hayden Connell.  After graduating from Princeton (AB 1975, M.Arch 1979) she worked for Philip Johnson,  held faculty appointments at the University of Virginia, NJIT, and her alma mater. ckracauer@aiany.org
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Brooklyn Bridge Park unveils 14 tower designs amid community debate

All the top names in New York City architecture are vying for a piece of Brooklyn Bridge Park, but whether any of their designs will be realized still remains to be seen. As community groups try to block Mayor de Blasio’s controversial plans to bring affordable housing to Michael Van Valkenburgh's celebrated park, the Brooklyn Bridge Park Corporation has unveiled 14 design proposals for two coveted development sites on Pier 6. Those proposals were unveiled just hours before a Brooklyn Bridge Park Corporation meeting that was packed with community members voicing their strong opposition to any new development in the park. The RFP that the corporation issued in May called for two towers—one 315 feet and the other 155—that are 30 percent affordable. This plan has been met with plenty of opposition, and even a lawsuit, from local groups who claim the towers will block views, eat up green space, and not provide appropriate funding for the park. Under a Bloomberg-era deal, revenue from private development at the park is intended to cover its upkeep and maintenance costs. At the meeting, local residents asked the corporation to reevaluate that plan and pursue other forms of funding. Most were adamantly opposed to new residential towers at the 85-acre park. "This is about developer's greed," shouted one woman during the meeting who was quickly met with applause. There were two individuals with signs that read "Parks for All / Not Condo$ for a Few" and even kids stationed right in front of the corporation's members with homemade signs that read "Save Our Park" and "We Love Our Park." Ultimately, the corporation voted 10-3 not to revisit the funding plan. It will, however, complete a new environmental review of the site. As the Wall Street Journal reported on Tuesday, if the lawsuit can be resolved, a decision on the site should be made by the end of the year and construction could start about year after that. The proposals for the pier, which were barely mentioned at the meeting, came from architects including Morris AdjmiPelli Clarke Pelli,Bjarke IngelsDavis Brody Bond, and Selldorf Architects, among others. You can check out all 14 proposals in the slideshow below, which reveal a wide variety of tower aesthetics rendered with most of the standbys we've come to expect in modern visualizations—hot air balloons, regular balloons, and plenty of birds. Surprisingly, not a single kayak.    
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Morris Adjmi Designs 13-Story Apartment Building for Williamsburg, Brooklyn

A rendering has been released for a Morris Adjmi-designed apartment building in South Williamsburg, Brooklyn. Curbed reported that the 13-story building contains 82 rentals and 26,000-square-feet of landscaped space; the base of the building has about 30,000-square-feet for retail, and a nearly 7,000-square-foot community space. The under-construction structure is located just steps from the J,M,Z subway lines, and only a few block inland from the Domino Sugar Factory While Goldstein, Hill & West is the architect of record for 282 South 5th St., it’s clear that Adjmi had a heavy hand in the design. The structure’s glass facade is framed with a black, steel exoskeleton that resembles his work at the Wythe Hotel and a host of other buildings he has designed around the city. It could also be seen as the "before" version of his twisting topper in the Meatpacking District.