Posts tagged with "MoMA/PS 1 Young Architects Program":

AN tours the 2018 Young Architects Program installation at MoMA PS1

MoMA PS1’s 2018 Young Architects Program (YAP) installation is set to open for the summer on June 28, and The Architect’s Newspaper took a behind-the-scenes look at the winning entry from Minneapolis-based Dream The Combine. Husband-and-wife partners Jennifer Newsom and Tom Carruthers of Dream The Combine, and Clayton Binkley of ARUP were on hand for a guided press preview of the steel-and-glass Hide & Seek, now installed in PS1’s courtyard. This year’s YAP installation is highly technical and stark at first glance, but is still responsive at the human-scale and cuts a striking figure as the lighting conditions change overhead. Eight intersecting elements made of black steel–Carruthers co-owns a metal fabrication shop in Minneapolis–stretch across PS1’s open space, creating a layered experience for museum-goers. Each end of the horizontal structures on the ground-level are capped with enormous suspended mirrors, which move both in response to the wind as well as visitor participation; the mirrored-panels have had handles welded to their back. The bending, constantly shifting viewpoints and reflections of Hide & Seek are designed to introduce a measure of spontaneity and unpredictability to the concrete-walled courtyard. Mirrors mounted high above the ground break the visual constraints of the PS1 courtyard and provide glimpses of the surrounding neighborhood to passerbys and vice versa. The installation’s central structure, a catwalk installed just past PS1’s entrance, turns into an infinitely-reflecting hallway as the mirrors at its ends move in the breeze. It also provides shade from the harsh summer sun via a stretched overhead canopy. As Newsom and Carruthers explained, the black fabric is intended to physically both block and filter the sun so that looking up invokes the feeling of viewing the night sky, as well as symbolically represent the poche of a drawn plan. A large-scale hammock nearby trades the plywood flooring of the catwalk for springy netting (though the installation doesn’t have a trampoline-level of bounce, AN’s editors spotted plenty of children trying to catch some air anyway). “For the 19th year of the Young Architects Program, Dream The Combine’s provocative intervention Hide & Seek tests the effects of rapid development in Long Island City, Queens and, more broadly, the American city,” wrote Associate Curator of MoMA’s Department of Architecture and Design Sean Anderson. “Conceived as a temporary site of exchange, the proposal activates the MoMA PS1 courtyard as a speculative frontier to be magnified, transgressed, and re-occupied.” Hide & Seek will also act as a staging area for PS1’s Warm Up concert series, and the steel sculptures overhead will reportedly be bathed in mist and light at night in response to the music below. Hide & Seek will be on display and open to the public from June 28 until September 3. An exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art's main building showcasing the schemes from all five finalists will run concurrently.

MoMA showcases 2018 Young Architects Program finalists ahead of PS1 opening

From now until September 3, the MoMA will be exhibiting Dream The Combine’s winning scheme for this year’s Young Architects Program (YAP), as well as the other four finalists’ work. Hide & Seek opens to the public at MoMA PS1 on June 28, but until then, the MoMA exhibition provides a sneak peek that should tide over visitors. Hide & Seek Design: Jennifer Newsom and Tom Carruthers of Dream The Combine in collaboration with Clayton Binkley of ARUP Structural Engineering: Clayton Binkley and Kristen Strobel, ARUP Project Team: Max Ouellette-Howitz, Nero He, Tom Vogel, Emmy Tong, and Erik Grinde, with support from UMN School of Architecture Dream The Combine is the 19th YAP winner. The firm's scheme will create a series of dynamic pavilions across PS1’s courtyard and up the steps to the museum. Nine overlapping black steel catwalks will stretch across the open area, including inaccessible platforms hovering overhead. Three of the paths will hold giant, moveable mirrors that can “turn an individual into a crowd” or unify separate elements of the installation. Fabric sails will be floated overhead at certain points and fitted with misters to create an ethereal and spacey feeling at night. Hide & Seek is, according to Jennifer Newsom, an attempt to create an ever-changing experience in PS1’s courtyard by building new visual connections throughout the space and beyond. Shelf Life Design: LECAVALIER R+D, Jesse LeCavalier Project team: Ayesha Ghosh, Jesse McCormick, Zachary White Structural engineering support: LED - Laufs Engineering Design, New York City & Berlin What exactly is “logistics”? How can we better connect and explore the invisible machinery that drives modern global commerce? For Shelf Life, LECAVALIER R+D re-appropriates the stacking and racking machinery usually found in factories and turns it into an immersive exhibition structure. In their proposal, furniture is built straight into the massive frame, and the entire pavilion would be disassembled and integrated back into the global logistics stream at the end of summer. Out of the Picture Project Team: FreelandBuck, Alex Kim, Taka Tachibe, Belinda Lee, Braden Young, Adin Rimland, Michael Raymundo, Adrian Lanetti, Evan Preuss, Jose Avila Structural Engineering by Matthew Melnyk of Nous Engineering Out of the Picture sought, much like Hide and Seek, to “bring the outside in” to PS1’s courtyard. Enormous fabric banners are stretched across the central plaza and decorated with distorted images of the surrounding buildings. The result is a reinterpretation of the neighborhood from a new perspective, transformed but still readable. Loud Lines Design: BairBalliet Structural Consultants: Walter P Moore, Kais Al-Rawi, Quinton Champer Project Team: Chaoqun Chen, Jose Garcia, Andrew Lang, Spencer McNeil, Ruta Misiunas Lines and vectors are often abstract concepts on a screen in architecture, but BairBalliet sought to translate the often-striking lines in diagrams into tangible structures. During the day, Loud Lines is solid black and imposing, but at night, the structure pulses with neon light from within. The rods emit a cooling mist to further blur the lines between the real and the immaterial. The Beastie Design: OFICINAA: Silvia Benedito and Alexander Häusler. Cambridge, MA, and Ingolstadt, Germany The Beastie proposed a technologically forward-thinking assemblage in PS1’s courtyard; an interactive structure that would have turned solar energy into ice. Inside the multi-walled chambers of The Beastie, visitors would explore a range of different temperatures, ranging from pleasant to freezing. More than a cool-down station, The Beastie was intended to raise awareness of climate change by exposing guests to “climatic confusion”. All of the YAP finalists were required to design an outdoor shelter that included shade, water, and seating. After the proposals are finished showing at the MoMA, the installation will travel to MAXXI (Museo nazionale delle arti del XXI secolo) in Rome, and CONSTRUCTO in Santiago.

With a newfound interest in housing, Bureau Spectacular’s aesthetic-driven practice matures

“We’re kind of new around here,” Joanna Grant, partner at Los Angeles–based Bureau Spectacular explained while taking a coffee break on a desolate sidewalk outside the shabby three-story commercial building that houses the firm’s recently relocated offices. “We got priced out of Downtown,” she said, before motioning toward the structure, which is currently occupied on the ground floor by a security door company that has strung up its various prototypes—drop-down metal doors, accordion style–security grilles—along the brick building’s thickly painted facade. The ecstatic setting is well-suited for the firm, where on the uppermost level, Grant and Bureau Spectacular founder Jimenez Lai helm an already storied practice that is hard at work tinkering away on a collection of new and evocative works that span the full spectrum of practice– “from spoons to cities,” Lai later explained, echoing a famous line by Italian architect Ernesto Rogers. Though the firm has been in existence for nearly 10 years—first as a solo project by Lai and starting in 2016 with Grant as a partner (Grant originally joined the office in 2013)—and has achieved worldwide renown for its eye-catching formalism and genre-shattering typological amalgamations, current projects under development—accessory dwelling units, social housing schemes, private residences—have the potential to reshape the image of the firm wholesale. As the designers pivot from fuzzy worlds, architecturally inspired comic books, and super-scaled installations toward built work, furniture and product lines, and gallery exhibitions, a chief question is on the table: Is Bureau Spectacular growing up? Palm Desert House Joshua Tree, California The office is also working toward several housing experiments, including still-under-wraps social housing schemes and a custom home for a client located in Joshua Tree, California. The radical private home is a love child of Le Corbusier’s “five points of architecture,” Philip Johnson’s Glass house, and the suburban tract home. The project features specifically calibrated window hoods that point the home’s eyes away from an unfriendly neighbor and hints at some of the formal and symbolic forays Bureau Spectacular might soon take in its work. Pool Party Long Island City, New York Building off of Tower of 12 Stories, Bureau Spectacular’s proposal for the 2017 MoMA PS1 Young Architects Program envisions a collection of ready-made swimming pools raised above the museum courtyard and filled with circulating water to create a “lightweight framework safe for five thousand drunk people” to enjoy. Designed in collaboration with Matthew Melnyk of Nous Engineering, the pools are orchestrated to shade partygoers via evaporative cooling and are designed to utilize minimal materials for maximum aesthetic result. A metal scaffolding supports the oddly-shaped pools, creating an installation inspired in equal parts by Cedric Price, Kisho Kurokawa, John Hejduk, and Yona Friedman. Tower of 12 Stories Coachella, California Lai, who is “approaching 40” and finds himself caught between the freewheeling days of his cartoon-addled youth and new potential endeavors in social housing, is perhaps most popularly known in the non-architecture world for the firm’s 52-foot-tall, piloti-supported Coachella installation from 2016, A Tower of Twelve Stories. According to Lai, the all-white stack of funny shapes is meant to represent a sectional model through a fictitious apartment building and is inspired in part by the no-space theories of Rem Koolhaas. The steel-supported and plywood-wrapped installation is designed as “a tower without typical plans, but rather specific rooms with specific geometries” and was lit up in a sea of ever-changing colors when installed in the High Desert two years ago. Snuggle Los Angeles “We’re still young architects; we’re just less immature now,” Grant clarifies when the question of Bureau Spectacular’s age comes up. As the practice has matured, however, many of the defining characteristics of its earliest works have remained, including the approach of considering design at the intimate scale of the human body. Grant and Lai have various product lines in the works, including a roughly seven-foot-long body pillow designed by Grant that can be twisted into knots around the body or looped around one’s neck like a scarf. The scarf is currently under production and was recently for sale at the THIS X THAT Pop-Up at MOCA Geffen Contemporary in L.A. Backyard Urbanism Los Angeles A common thread throughout Bureau Spectacular’s work involves imbuing orgiastic fun into everyday typologies, a notion the team applied to a recent Los Angeles County–sponsored ideas competition for accessory dwelling units (ADU) called YES to ADU. Bureau Spectacular received an honorable mention award for the contest with the firm’s Backyard Urbanism project that proposes more or less to collectivize neighborhood backyards with multifunctional ADUs that each perform beneficial neighborhood services like providing shared swimming pools or acting as large-scale receivers for satellite television signals.

Dream the Combine wins 2018 MoMA PS1 Young Architects Program

Minneapolis, Minnesota—based Jennifer Newsom and Tom Carruthers of Dream the Combine have won the 19th annual Young Architects Program (YAP), sponsored by The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) and MoMA PS1, with their project entitled Hide & Seek. The responsive and kinetic installation is developed in collaboration with Clayton Binkley of ARUP and will be on view in the MoMA courtyard starting in June 2018. Hide & Seek promises to bring several dynamic, performance-based pavilions to PS1’s courtyard spaces in order to create a “multiplicity of viewpoints where everyone’s experience is valid,” Newsom explained over telephone. The installation is made up of nine discrete compositional elements that run throughout the courtyards, including three platform areas containing opposing, movable mirrored walls. These mirrored spaces will attempt to unify the adjoining courtyard areas while integrating a performance stage, a concessions stand, and a cool-down spot into the installation. A small ancillary courtyard will contain an oversized catamaran fabric hammock. Portions of the remaining installation will be shaded by overhead fabric sails outfitted with misters calibrated to give the space an ethereal atmosphere after dark. Each of the three main steel-framed structures will contain two inward-facing, gimbaled mirrors that can be manipulated by party goers to reflect each weekend’s unique “catharsis of movement,” according to Newsom. The infinitely-reflective mirrors create an “illusion of space [that] expands beyond the physical boundaries [of PS1] and bends into new forms, creating visual connections within the courtyard and onto the streets outside,” a press release states. Regarding the proposal for Hide & Seek, Sean Anderson, associate curator in MoMA’s Department of Architecture and Design, said, “Conceived as a temporary site of exchange, the proposal activates the MoMA PS1 courtyard as a speculative frontier to be magnified, transgressed, and re-occupied.” For the proposal, the designers were inspired partially by the dramatic change in use seen within the courtyard between the raucous weekend parties and more reserved weekday uses of the space. In reference to the opposing nature of the courtyard’s activities throughout the week, Carruthers said, “We are trying to create an installation that’s not just an object, but that is able to be responsive at different times of use.” Dream the Combine beat out LeCavalier R+D, FreelandBuck, OFICINAA, and BairBalliet for the YAP commission. An exhibition highlighting the five finalists' proposed projects will be on view at MoMA over the summer.

Jenny Sabin’s selling stools from her MoMA PS1 installation

At MoMA PS1 this year, Jenny Sabin's Lumen gave many a reason to look up through the SolarActive and photo-luminescent thread knitted funnels. Look down, however, and you would have spotted an array of equally exquisite "spool stools" that complimented the installation. The last Warm Up—the last chance to see Lumen—is this weekend. The stools, however, are available to purchase through Jenny Sabin Studio's website. There you can own one (or more) of the 100 stools that were used during the installation's three-month run. Though three variations of the seat were produced, all were made in a similar fashion. To make the "spool stool," recycled plywood spools, carved into serrated pinwheels were placed at either end while a robot—named Sulla—spun woven micro-cord thread in a hyperbolic fashion around their perimeter. Each stool is also topped and bottomed by CNC cut caps, which, to Jenny Sabin Studio's own admission, may be a tad word from usage, but are in general in great condition. Three stool sizes are on sale. The smallest, priced at $150, is able to double-up as a side table, while the medium and large–sized stools, $200 and $250 respectively, can seat up to three people and be used as table as well. The stools are available to purchase at jennysabin.com but there's no delivery—they must be picked up from MoMA PS1.

Jenny Sabin wins this year’s MoMA Young Architects Program

Ithaca, New York—based practice Jenny Sabin Studio has won the 18th iteration of The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) and MoMA PS1’s annual Young Architects Program for her project entitled Lumen. The immersive design will be on show starting June 27 at the MoMA PS1 courtyard in Long Island City.

Lumen changes throughout the day, offering shade and shelter from the sun, while also providing artificial illumination after sunset. This is achieved thanks to a tubular lattice canopy comprised of recycled, photo-luminescent, and solar active textiles that absorb, collect, and emit light. The canopy reacts to changes in daylight, absorbing and producing light when necessary. In conjunction with this, fabric stalactites will release mist in response to visitors' proximity, allowing the adaptive structure to respond to changes in heat and the density of the crowd.

Sabin's design will be present for the 20th season of Warm Up, an outdoor music series from MoMA PS1, and will stay on view for the rest of summer. Lumen was chosen as the winner ahead of four other projects. The competition brief called for projects that address environmental issues such as sustainability and recycling. The temporary outdoor installation had to be capable of providing water as well as seating and shade.

"Jenny Sabin's catalytic immersive environment, Lumen, captured the jury's attention for imaginatively merging public and private spaces," said Sean Anderson, associate curator in MoMA’s Department of Architecture and Design. "With innovative construction and design processes borne from a critical merging of technology and nature to precise attention to detail at every scale, Lumen will no doubt engage visitors from day to night in a series of graduated environments and experiences."

Losing out to Sabin were four other finalists. These included Bureau Spectacular (Jimenez Lai and Joanna Grant), Ania Jaworska, Office of III (Sean Canty, Ryan Golenberg, and Stephanie Lin), and SCHAUM/SHIEH (Rosalyne Shieh and Troy Schaum). Despite not being realized, their work will be on show at the MoMA during the summer.

“The Young Architects Program remains one of the most significant opportunities for architects and designers from across the country and world to build radical yet transformative ideas. This year's finalists are no exception; their projects illustrate a diversity of approaches and refreshing ideas for architecture today,” Anderson added.

Finalists announced for 2017 MoMA/PS1 Young Architects Program

The five finalists for the 2017 MoMA PS1 Young Architects Program (YAP) are here. The annual competition provides a stage for some of the best up-and-coming architects in the world; the winning installation is built in the MoMA PS1's courtyard for its Warm Up music series of performances. "The Young Architects Program is committed to offering emerging architectural talent the opportunity to design and present innovative projects, challenging each year’s winners to develop creative designs for a temporary, outdoor installation that provides shade, seating, and water. The architects must also work within guidelines that address environmental issues, including sustainability and recycling," according to the MoMA PS1 website.
This year's finalists are:
Recent YAP winners include Escobedo Soliz Studio (2016), Andrés Jaque / Office for Political Innovation (2015), The Living / David Benjamin, CODA / Caroline O'Donnell, as well as MOS Architects, SO-IL, WORKac, HWKN, and SHoP.
The winner will be announced in February and the installation will be built in time for the Warm Up series that starts in June.
Finalists are nominated by prominent journalists and academics, and the selection of five is made by a panel including Glenn D. Lowry, Director of The Museum of Modern Art; Kathy Halbreich, Associate Director at MoMA; Klaus Biesenbach, Director of MoMA PS1; Peter Reed, Senior Deputy Director for Curatorial Affairs; Martino Stierli, Philip Johnson Chief Curator of Architecture & Design at MoMA, Sean Anderson, Associate Curator of Architecture at MoMA; and Jenny Schlenzka, Associate Curator at MoMA PS1.

Escobedo Solíz Studio’s Weaving the Courtyard opens at MoMA PS1

This past Saturday inaugurated the MOMA PS1's 19th Warm Up summer music series and its accompanying installation, the latter of which is appropriately dubbed Weaving the Courtyard. It was designed by Mexico City-based Escobedo Solíz Studio and its relatively simple design—at least compared to last year's water-filtering giant—was selected as part of the museum's Young Architects Program. Weaving the Courtyard features all the "urban beach" amenities you would expect: a large reflecting pool, wooden plank walkways, a mist machine, and large sandy "beach" in the main courtyard. The installation's brightly hued ropes plug into the formwork holes of the MoMA PS1's concrete walls. With its use of humble materials, and its origins with a young Mexico City-based architects, the project's simplicity and provenance definitely—by coincidence or otherwise—evokes Alejandro Aravena's "Reporting from the Front" theme for the Venice Biennale. While this reporter is concerned revelers will try to climb the ropes, in the meantime they certainly overlay a delightfully complex geometry over the courtyard's views toward surrounding architecture and the sky.

Goldstein, Hill & West Architects designs Long Island City’s tallest tower yet

Goldstein, Hill & West Architects (GHWA), in partnership with developer Chris Xu, just unleashed a 79-story residential tower on Long Island City, Queens. At 963 feet tall, the tower will be 305 feet taller than its neighbor, CitiGroup's 50-story One Court Square, already one of the tallest buildings in the neighborhood. The ground floor will sport 19,721 square feet of retail, while 774 apartments will be spread over 759,412 square feet of residential space. Xu bought the 79,000-square-foot site for $143 million from Citigroup in July 2015, YIMBY reports. This is not the New York–based firm's first high rise: GHWA is behind Long Island City's 42–12 28th Street, a 57-story residential tower, as well as 605 West 42nd Street, a glassy 60-story residential tower "detailed in a clean modernist idiom." Walking down Jackson Avenue, it's hard not to notice all the new high rises going up in the neighborhood. Walking down Jackson Avenue in the late afternoon, though, and it's hard not to be blinded by the sunlight that reflects from all those new buildings. The so-called Court Square City View Tower is a mere four blocks from MoMA PS1, and, although there's no word yet on when construction will begin, visitors to PS1 this summer will be thankful for the central feature of Escobedo Solíz Studio's Young Architects Program installation. The colorful rope canopy promises to shade visitors from skyscraper sunburns, giving a whole new meaning to Warm Up.

MoMA PS1 names five finalists for the 2016 Young Architects Program

MoMA has announced five finalists for the 2016 Young Architects Program. The winner will design and build an installation in MoMA PS1's courtyard during the summer Warm Up performance series. The honor is considered one of the most prestigious platforms for emerging architects in the United States and internationally. Notably, there are no New York architects on the lists this year. This is the program's seventeenth year. To choose the finalists, editors of architecture publications and deans of architecture schools nominate around twenty established architects working in a new style or with new methods, current students, and recent architecture school graduates. Practitioners and curators from the art and architecture worlds winnow the field down to five finalists. First Office / Andrew Atwood and Anna Neimark, Los Angeles ESCOBEDO + SOLIS / Lazbent Pavel Escobedo Amaral and Andres Soliz Paz, Mexico City ULTRAMODERNE / Yasmin Vobis and Aaron Forrest, Providence, Rhode Island COBALT OFFICE / Andrew Colopy and Robert Booth, Houston, Texas Frida Escobedo / Mexico City Last year, Madrid- and New York–based Andres Jacque Architects/Office for Political Innovation won the competition with COSMO, a living machine that makes the water filtration process visible. The whimsical installation commented on sustainability as well as architecture as the product of global networks. COSMO was sourced from generic parts in Spain, shipped to New York, and assembled onsite.

Madrid’s Andres Jacque wins MoMA PS1 2015 Young Architects Program

MoMA and MoMA PS 1 have announced the winner of the 2015 Young Architects Program from a shortlist of five firms: Andres Jacque Architects/Office for Political Innovation. Based in Madrid and New York, Jacque's firm will build COSMO, a large structure made of irrigation tubes and planted zones, which will make the process of water filtration visible to PS 1 visitors. The structure will contain 3,000 gallons of water which will take four days to complete the cycle of purification through the structure. Seating and performance areas will be located underneath the suspended structure, which, when illuminated at night, will become a beacon in the neighborhood. The project is intended as a prototype, which could be recreated anywhere in the world to create fresh drinking water. "This year's proposal takes one of the Young Architects Program's essential requirements—providing a water feature for leisure and fun—and highlights water itself as a scarce resource," said Pedro Gadanho, a curator of architecture and design at MoMA, in a statement. "Relying on off-the-shelf components from agro-industrial origin, an exuberant mobile architecture celebrates water-purification processes and turns their intricate visualization into an unusual backdrop." COSMO will open in late June as a part of the annual Warm Up summer party series at MoMA PS 1. The Young Architects Program has become on the world's leading showcases for emerging architectural talent.

BREAKING: HWKN Wins 2012 PS 1 Young Architects Program

New York-based HWKN has been selected for this year's MoMA/PS 1 Young Architects Program. Their proposal, called "Wendy," uses standard scaffolding to create a visually arresting object that straddles the three outdoor rooms of the PS 1 courtyard. Tensioned fabric coated in smog-eating paint provides shelter and programming areas including a stage, shower, and misters. "Their proposal is quite attractive in a number of ways. It's very economical in terms of design," said Pedro Gadanho, the curator of contemporary architecture at MoMA. "One object creates a variety of programmatic and ecological conditions and its scale rivals the height of the PS 1 building." All the materials can be disassembled and reused, and according to Gadanho, the jury was particularly impressed with the combination of standardized parts (the scaffolding) and cutting edge technology (the smog-eating coating). "It's pro-active, it's not apologetic," he said. "It begins to point to a new way to think about sustainability." The designers, led by principals Matthias Hollwich and Marc Kushner and project architect Robert May, estimate the fabric will remove as much smog as taking 250 cars off the road. The pavilion will open in late June.