Posts tagged with "Mixed-Use":

Heatherwick Studio to overhaul massive London exhibition center

Thomas Heatherwick’s studio has released renderings of their plan to overhaul Olympia, an events center in west London. The design would transform the Victorian exhibition hall into a high-profile mixed-use space. Heatherwick Studio, along with London-based architecture firm SPPARC, will transform the 130-year-old exhibition hall into a mixed-use district that will hold a hotel, theatre, museums, co-working spaces, restaurants, and entertainment spaces. The $920 million project will completely overhaul the space to make way for almost 600,000-square-feet of office and studio space, and 70,000-square-feet of co-working space. Another 2.5 acres will be dedicated towards public areas. The renderings also reveal plans to pedestrianize Olympia Way and add new public and community spaces while preserving the historic facade, as well as a new, modern building for a theater and performing arts space. The redevelopment of Olympia is set to position it as a global destination for creative industries, as well as having a significant impact on its surrounding area, like the regenerations of Covent Garden and King’s Cross. The owners of Olympia, Deutsche Finance and Yoo Capital, first announced that they were planning to develop the site in 2017. Olympia was completed in 1886 and designed by architect Henry Edward Coe. It’s key features, a massive domed window and an arched roof supported by ironwork, will not be affected by the redevelopment. The 15-acre site hosts exhibitions and events annually, such as 100% Design, part of the London Design Festival, and welcomes 1.6 million visitors every year. “As caretakers of Olympia London, we are investing to protect this iconic site and promote it on the global stage as a world-leading destination for the creative industries," John Hitchcox, chairman of Yoo Capital, said. The current designs were developed with feedback from event organizers, exhibitors, and visitors. There will be a period of public consultation before a planning application is submitted in September of this year. Meanwhile, Heatherwick Studio is working on Google’s headquarters in King’s Cross with Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG).

It’s official: A new 1,020-foot tower is coming to Downtown Los Angeles

The developers behind a recently-proposed project that would bring a 1,020-foot-tall, Handel Architects-designed skyscraper complex to Downtown Los Angeles have officially submitted their project plans with the City of L.A. Urbanize.la reports that developers MacFarlane Partners, Peebles Corporation, and Claridge Partners submitted updated plans for a 1.26 million-square-foot proposal last week that would bring 120 condominiums, 450 apartments, 480 hotel rooms, and 50,000-square-feet of commercial uses to the hillside site formerly known as Angels Knoll park.  The $1.2 billion project will also include a 45,000-square-foot charter school and is being designed to hug the rugged terrain via a complex of porous edges that connect to the adjacent Angels Flight funicular and an associated staircase. Site and landscape design for the project is being performed by OLIN and will feature a complex set of outdoor terraces, amphitheaters, and gardens. At least 50 percent of the project site will be left open under the current scheme, with a pair of towers and a stepped podium occupying improved areas.  Glenn Rescalvo, partner at Handel Architects, told The Los Angeles Times, “We want to make the site as permeable as possible. You could enter from different points and reach all the other locations." Renderings for the project depict a tapered 88-story tower filled with condominiums, apartments, and 192 hotel rooms. A second, 27-story tower will house the remaining hotel rooms and the charter school.  Don Peebles of Peebles Corporation told The Los Angeles Times, "It's basically a neighborhood within a building," adding, “It's the wave of the future for urban living." The Handel Architects proposal was selected by the city’s Chief Legislative Analyst earlier this year from among three other bids that included proposals by Natoma Architects and Gensler. The development site was originally envisioned as the location for a third tower planned for the California Plaza complex in the 1980s and 1990s, but the plan never materialized. Instead, disused site eventually became Angels Knoll park in early 2000s and was immortalized in the 2009 film 500 Days of Summer. The park closed in 2013 and its grounds have sat fenced-off and vacant ever since.  The project will soon be joining the long-stalled, Frank Gehry-designed Grand Avenue Project, which is slated to contain 436 housing units, a 314-room hotel and 209,000 square feet of commercial space in a pair of 20- and 39-story towers. The Handel Architects project is estimated to take at least 41 months to build; the development team behind the project has announced a projected completion date of December 31, 2024.

San Diego’s largest, costliest development in city history begins construction on the waterfront

A massive $1.5 billion plan to redevelop a string of formerly Navy-owned properties along the San Diego waterfront is finally entering into the construction phase following years of delays and decades’ worth of planning and environmental review.  The so-called Manchester Pacific Gateway development developed by San Diego-based Manchester Financial Group will bring over 3 million square feet of mixed-use development and a 1.9-acre park to eight ocean-fronting city blocks in the San Diego’s downtown area.  The multi-phase project will be anchored by a new Navy headquarters, to be housed in a new 17-story, 372,000-square-foot mixed-use tower located at the heart of the project. The tower complex will also include: a 1,100-room convention hotel, a 29-story, 524,000-square-foot office tower, an eight-story, 178,000-square-foot office building, a six-story, 153,000-square-foot office tower, 290,000 square feet of retail spaces, and a 260-key luxury hotel, the San Diego Union-Tribune reports.  Renderings for the project depict a collection of traditionally-styled high-rises with arched storefront windows along the ground floors and repetitive spans of curtainwall glass interrupted by vertical and horizontal bands of masonry detailing on upper levels. One of the tower blocks will consist of a pair of linked towers that are connected via a skywalk while other structures in the complex will feature stepped-back facades and punched openings along certain exposures. The two largest building clusters feature four-story podium structures that anchor the towers located above, with both podium levels topped with terraces and garden amenities, including an elliptical swimming pool.  A site-wide pedestrian spine will run across the length of the properties and will transform into an interior, retail-lined arcade when it bisects the largest structure in the complex.  An architect has not been named for the project.  Work on all phases of the Manchester Pacific Gateway project is to be undertaken simultaneously, with the new Navy headquarters and several of the office towers scheduled to be completed in late 2020. The remaining project components are slated for a mid-2021 debut.  The project is among a long list of waterfront redvelopment efforts in San Diego, including another $1.5 billion development for the Port of San Diego aimed at tourists and a 41-story “super prime” luxury tower by Kohn Pedersen Fox.

Dying Cupertino mall could yield 2,400 housing units under Rafael Viñoly-designed plan

Sometimes you just have to go for broke and hope for the best. At least, that seems to be the route the developers behind a massive Rafael Viñoly Architects-designed project slated for the dying Vallco mall in Cupertino, California have in mind, as they push forward with a new, denser version of their long-stalled Vallco Town Center project. Developer Sand Hill Property Company unveiled a new vision for the 55-acre site yesterday that invokes the recently-passed SB-35 state law, a measure that allows developers to override local opposition and certain environmental controls for projects that meet local zoning code and set aside a specified percentage of their proposed housing units as affordable homes. In the case of Vallco Town Center, Sand Hill Property Company is proposing a total of 2,402 units, with 1,201 of those set aside for extremely low- and low-income residents. The eye-catching project proposes replacing the city’s cratered mall with a sprawling mixed-use town square-style district containing 400,000 square feet of retail and entertainment functions, 1.81 million square feet of offices, as well as the aforementioned housing element. The entire thing, according to new renderings unveiled in tandem with the SB-35 plan, will be capped by a parabolic, publicly-accessible rooftop garden. According to a project website, the community park will feature walking and jogging trails, playing fields, picnic areas, orchards and organic gardens, children’s play zones as well as a “refuge for native species of plants and birds.” A series of public squares will also populate the retail areas, while super-sized entry portals will demarcate the development from adjacent, single-family home areas. Regarding the decision to take the SB-35 path, Reed Moulds, managing director of Sand Hill, told The Mercury News, “It has now gotten to a point where we do not have any confidence that this process can come to a conclusion in a timely manner,” adding, “This housing crisis needs to be resolved in a manner that actually provides near-term solutions, and sites like this have an opportunity to do a lot of good for the housing situation.” Under the latest plan, the Vallco development would help Cupertino surpass a state-mandated affordable housing production goal set of building 1,064 affordable units by 2022, The San Francisco Chronicle reports. The city has so far approved just over 800 affordable units via other projects. The developers have been working with community stakeholders and municipal authorities since 2015 on various versions of a proposed redevelopment plan, with the most recent reboot prior to the latest effort occurring in late-2016. Although the developers are pushing for aggressive expansion and a faster timeline with their latest version of the project, Sand Hill “does not intend for its SB-35 application to upset the ongoing planning process,” according to the project website. Under the new SB-35 regulations, local authorities have between 90 and 180 days to approve compliant projects. That gives the municipality three to six months to hammer out a compromise with Sand Hill, a prospect that is unlikely given the strong anti-housing bias city residents and officials have taken to this and similar projects. An updated construction timeline has not been provided.

Renderings unveiled for 1,200-unit development slated for L.A.’s Westside

Solomon Cordwell Buenz, TCA Architects, and developers Carmel Partners have unveiled renderings for the 1,210-unit Cumulus development, a new mixed-use project slated for the former KLOS and KABC radio broadcast facilities at the La Cienega/Jefferson Expo Line stop in Los Angeles. The tower-and-slab project will bring a cluster of seven-story courtyard apartment blocks as well as a 30-story housing tower to a transit-adjacent area currently populated mostly by industrial structures and single-family homes. The structures will feature ground-floor retail spaces and will also surround a new one-acre public park designed by Studio MLA. Renderings for the 11-acre project depict the mid-rise apartments laid out in a perimeter block formation, with the central green wrapped by an internal street and overlooked by the units above. The apartment blocks themselves are sheathed in various finishes and feature articulated massing, shifting floor plates, and collected amenities along various rooftop levels. According to a draft environmental impact report, the development will contain 300,000 square feet of commercial floor area, including 200,000 square feet of office space, 50,000 square feet of grocery store, 20,000 square feet of restaurant space, and 30,000 square feet of general retail. Despite being located along a transit stop, the project contains 2,371 vehicle parking stalls for all the combined uses that are arranged throughout the complex in a five-level parking podium. The project will also contains 1,500 bicycle parking spaces located in an indoor bike room. The apartment tower has its own dedicated two-story parking podium and does not connect to the mid-rise blocks. The tower is slated to rise 330 feet and will join the forthcoming 17-story (W)rapper tower coming to the area by Eric Owen Moss Architects. Urbanize.la reports that excavation for the project’s parking is set to begin in two months. A final construction timeline is not available

Arquitectonica’s mixed-use megaproject to replace Miami strip club moves ahead

A 1-million-square-foot, mixed-use development is set to break ground in North Miami Beach, replacing the historic Dean’s Gold strip club at the intersection of NE 163rd Street and Biscayne Boulevard. Miami-based developer CK Privé Group has teamed up with local firm Arquitectonica (no stranger to office and residential design in the city) for the project, which will be called Uptown Biscayne. While the plans for Uptown Biscayne have been presented and revised since developers purchased the current site in 2015, the project will move ahead and break ground after North Miami Beach’s City Council gave the project its official blessing on February 21. The 4.9-acre plot will eventually hold 170,000 square feet of retail, 35,000 square feet of office space, 245 luxury apartments in a 16-story tower, and 1,000 parking spaces. The development’s location is crucial to its success, as CK Privé Group is banking on the traffic (and traffic jams) at the adjacent intersection to drive visitors to the retail component. “Traffic is bad in all of Miami,” Michael Comras, president and CEO of The Comras Company, the leasing company for the project, told the Miami Herald. “But traffic is also the most important element for the retail component. If you don’t have traffic, you don’t have successful retail. We believe this location is the gateway to Aventura and Sunny Isles. Everyone who drives north into Aventura or east into Sunny Isles goes by there.” Arquitectonica has gone green for the design, incorporating a 40,000-square-feet vertical green wall across the interconnected exterior façades, as well a wide pedestrian “main street” sidewalk lined with trees and an organic “edible community garden”. The design sensibility is also unmistakably Arquitectonica’s, as all of the façades shown so far prominently feature strong lines, repeating squares, and the usage of strategically placed “gap” windows to break up the repetitive patterns. Dean’s Gold was a holdout from Miami’s “gritty” days, when Miami Vice and Scarface had cemented the city’s reputation as a drug-running capital. Opened in 1989, the land under the club was purchased for $23.5 million, and Dean’s Gold will shutter now that Uptown Biscayne has been approved. CK Privé Group hopes to break ground on the project sometime later this year.

Pair of striking apartment blocks coming to L.A.’s Arts District from HansonLA

Los Angeles-based architects HansonLA and developers Maxxam Enterprises have unveiled renderings for a pair of eye-catching apartment blocks slated for the Los Angeles Arts District. Together, the two schemes could bring a combined 405 housing units to the booming neighborhood just east of downtown. The first, dubbed 676 Mateo, would bring 185 live-work units and 23,380 square feet of commercial space to a site located at the intersection of Mateo and Sixth Streets. According to the renderings, the complex would be anchored at the corner of the site by a sculptural eight-story tower wrapped in reflective metal skin. The eight-story tower features rounded window openings and is shown supported by a monolithic pier that would allow the ground floor of the site to remain as outdoor space. The covered plaza is capped by a reflective ceiling and would make up part of the project’s 15,000 square feet of open space. It is shown in the renderings flanked by expanses of storefronts. The tower would be joined on the site by a pair of brick-clad apartment blocks that feature more normative configurations, including rectilinear punched openings and projecting balconies. Eleven percent of the units at 676 Mateo will be set aside as affordable homes. A second development—dubbed 1100 E. 5th Street—would be located just a few blocks over and would bring another 220 live-work apartments to the area. Renderings for that project call for an eight-story apartment complex wrapped in square-shaped punched openings and metal paneling. The building will feature projecting triangular balconies and inset rectilinear loggia spaces. The complex will also feature 44,530 square feet of commercial areas as well as 23,000 square feet of open spaces, Urbanize.la reports. Like 676 Mateo, the 1100 E. 5th Street complex will set aside 11 percent of its dwellings as affordable housing. The complexes join a growing list of new, form-forward developments coming to the Arts District, including a 320-unit complex from SteinbergHart and Shimoda Design Group, an angular 12-story tower from Johnson Fain, and a 260-unit gridded complex by BIG.

Two mid-rise developments rising next to Wright’s Hollyhock House in L.A.

Los Angeles–based La Terra Development and Urban Architecture Lab are working to bring a combined 246 apartments and 23,300 square feet of retail to two sites adjacent to Barnsdall Art Park—home of the Frank Lloyd Wright–designed Hollyhock House—in L.A.’s Los Feliz neighborhood. Dubbed Los Feliz I and Los Feliz II and located at 4850 and 4900 Hollywood Boulevard, respectively, the two apartment complexes are designed to preserve views from the street toward the Hollyhock House, according to community preferences for neighborhood development. Renderings released by the developer show a pair of contemporary structures that feature a mix of vertically- and horizontally-oriented bands of projecting window assemblies, with the 4850 structure stepping back as it rises, creating rooftop terraces along lower sections. This structure contains a wide street frontage along Hollywood Boulevard that is occupied by storefronts and features a second-level courtyard, as well. The 4850 project aims to bring 96 apartments and 9,500 square feet of retail to the area, while the larger 4900 project will contain 150 units and 13,800 square feet of retail uses.  The 4900 proposal, on the other hand, is articulated as a more conventional apartment block with a solid wall of repeating window bays and projecting balconies running the length of Hollywood Boulevard. Located just a few blocks from the Vermont-Sunset stop on the Red Line subway, the projects are also being marketed by the developers as having commanding views of the Hollyhock House, the Griffith Observatory, and the Hollywood Sign. The twin developments join a growing list of medium-density projects that are on the way to the transit-adjacent area, including a trio of similarly-massed apartments headed for Sunset Junction, a 202-unit complex from Killefer Flammang Architects, and a 96-unit project by architecture firm KTGY. The La Terra projects are currently under development, but a timeline has not been released for either project, Urbanize.la reports. For more information, see the La Terra Development website.

Oakland’s tallest tower is on the way

A new project under development by Oakland, California–based Lowney Architecture and developer Pinnacle RED aims to bring the East Bay its newest—and tallest—mixed-use tower. The forthcoming 36-story tower will be located at 1261 Harrison Street and will bring 185 apartment units, 120,000 square feet of Class A office space, and 12,000 square feet of commercial uses to downtown Oakland, potentially transforming that city’s downtown Chinatown neighborhood. The 440-foot tower is billed as the city’s only mixed-use tower under development that combines commercial functions with affordable and market-rate housing under one roof. The arrangement is a by-product of the development’s utilization of a density bonus, which allows the developer to build taller and more densely in exchange for providing affordable housing units on-site.  The complex will be anchored on the ground floor by a market hall–style food court with a “locavore” focus. The tower is designed along the street to match the massing and “neighborhood rhythm” of surrounding commercial storefronts, according to Ken Lowney, principal at Lowney Architecture. The 11 floors above street level will be occupied by office spaces with the uppermost levels containing condominiums and maisonettes. Lowney told The Architect’s Newspaper that the lower level will house community-serving establishments that could potentially include current retail tenants occupying an existing commercial structure on the site that will give way to the development. Under the potential plan, a local bicycle shop will return to manage the building’s 185-stall bicycle parking facilities, for example. The project provides an automated 185-stall underground garage, though parking is not required for the site. The gridded glass tower complex grows from its contextual base in a canted fashion, splitting into two alternating masses as it rises up. The tower’s bifurcated facades are wrapped in a gridded frame that extends the depth of the building’s curtain walls out from each facade. The non-structural application of these gridded frames is a leftover from earlier design iterations that called for an externally-structured tower. Instead, the building is held up by internal beams and columns, a shear core, and moment frames. The glass panels that infill these frames are decorated with multicolored metal panels that are designed to reference surrounding conditions, with warmer, brick-like tones coloring lower levels and clear-blue panels populating the uppermost sections of the tower. In a statement, Mark Donahue of Lowney Architecture said,“We strove for a distinctive design by breaking up the building’s mass so that it appears as two towers, but is really one structure,” adding that the tower was designed to “match the façades of nearby, character-rich buildings.” The development is currently undergoing planning approval. 1261 Harrison Street is expected to take roughly two years to complete once plans are approved.

These four developments will reshape L.A.’s storied Solano Canyon corridor

Four forthcoming developments planned for areas immediately surrounding the recently-opened Los Angeles State Historical Park in Downtown Los Angeles's Chinatown and Solano Canyon neighborhoods have the potential to completely reshape the industrial, working-class area into a new node for mid-rise, mixed-use urbanism. According to various reports and an environmental review, the four projects detailed below will bring up to 1,690 housing units, 92,406 square feet of retail and office spaces, and 2,962 parking stalls to several transit-adjacent lots currently occupied by industrial warehouses, parking lots, or hillside brush. The new 32-acre state park opened earlier this year after a lengthy approval and renovation process and will eventually link to a fully-restored Los Angeles River greenway. The largest of these developments will be the two-phase Elysian Lofts complex by developers Lincoln Property Company, S&R Properties, and architects Newman Garrison + Partners. The linear development will be located on a long, narrow site bounded by the Gold Line and Broadway. The southern end of the 8.08-acre site closest to the Chinatown transit stop will be developed first. That section will include 451 residential units—including seven live-work suites— and 9,871 square feet of ground-floor retail. This phase will also include 3,465 square feet of office spaces and a three-level subterranean parking garage containing 880 parking stalls. Phase one of the project will be distributed across three mid-rise towers rising between 7- and 14-stories in height with the tallest tower topping out at 155 feet. The second phase of the project will improve the northernmost section of the site with 469 units, 8,070 square feet of retail, and 2,000 square feet of offices. This phase of the development will also include 10 live-work units. This second three-tower complex will sit atop a three-story parking podium with 903 parking stalls and will bookend a linear park located between the two development parcels. Phase two will be distributed across three mid-rise towers rising 7-, 8-, and 14-stories in height with the tallest tower topping out at 170 feet. The northern section of the site will also host a two-story structure containing a rooftop pool for use by residents. Renderings for the project depict grouped clusters of variegated mid-rise towers clad in large expanses of glass with views oriented over the State Historic Park. The development also features tree-lined sidewalks along Broadway and internal walkways but does not physically connect to the State Historic Park. According to currently available materials, the development does not include an affordable housing component. Just below the transit stop at the foot of the Elysian Lofts site, architects Workshop Design Collective is working on a 50,000-square-foot adaptive reuse project aimed at transforming the historic Capitol Milling Building. The brick- and timber-truss structure dates to 1881 and is being designed to include an artisanal food hall, a microbrewery, and creative offices among other uses. The five-building complex will be connected by a series of indoor-outdoor spaces that include a mezzanine level, dining terraces, and a public staircase. Across the street, architects Johnson Fain and developer Atlas Capital Group are working on a new mixed-use complex called College Station that will contain 770 dwelling units, 51,000 square feet of ground floor commercial spaces, and parking for 1,179 cars and 899 bicycles. The development will be spread out across six structures situated above a two-story podium containing parking and retail. The cluster of mid-rise housing blocks would be connected by a terrace level located above the podium. Renderings of the project depict a mix of linear apartment blocks featuring projecting balconies, metal panel cladding, and vertical louvers. The controversial project has been scaled down over time due to community concerns that it would jump-start gentrification in the area. Chinatown’s median household income is roughly $22,754 per year according to Preserve LA, and while the development is expected to contain some affordable housing, it is unclear whether those units would be affordable to current longtime residents. Just down the street from College Station, Omgivning is working on a 19,000-square foot adaptive reuse complex that would transform an existing poultry processing plant into a creative office and retail complex for developer City Constructors. The project involves designing the creative office portion of the building into a new 10,000-square-foot headquarters for the developer with the remaining 9,000 square feet of space dedicated to restaurants and retail. These projects are currently in various stages of development and will join a growing number of long-term proposals for areas surrounding Chinatown, the Los Angeles River, and the adjacent Olvera Street and Civic Center neighborhoods that include a new master plan as well as a speculative proposal by AECOM to add 36,000 housing units to areas around the L.A. River. With construction ramping up and new schemes coming to light almost weekly, it’s clear that the areas around L.A.’s Chinatown will soon look very different than they do today.

City Market of Los Angeles project approved by L.A. Planning Department

A plan crafted by developers City Market of Los Angeles and architects Hanson LA to drastically reshape a large section of the Los Angeles Fashion District in Downtown Los Angeles was unanimously approved by the Los Angeles City Planning Commission (LACPC) yesterday afternoon. In all, the roughly ten-acre development includes 16 development sites that will ultimately render up to 945 residential units, a 201-key hotel, 312,000 square feet of educational and creative offices, 225,000 square feet of retail spaces, and 272,000 square feet commercial office areas if built according to current plans. Hanson LA is serving as the master plan architect for the project, and the firm has developed the site plan for the project as well as written design guidelines for the development that will guide “what we do for the next 100 years” on the site, Doug Hanson told The Architect's Newspaper (AN). Hanson, a principal at Hanson LA, said the plan includes establishing a site-spanning amenity level roughly 20 feet off the street that will connect various blocks by spanning over the sidewalk. The elevated park is set at the height of neighboring industrial structures in order to maintain a contextual relationship with the neighborhood. The terrace, according to Hanson, will “speak to the history of the site” as an industrial district populated by warehouse structures. The designers hope that the elevated park spaces can provide much-needed public seating and gathering spaces for the neighborhood. The two-block-wide development will be bisected along the ground floor by a series of retail-lined pedestrian streets, with the terrace level above spanning between new structures to create an outdoor mezzanine promenade. The designers released a set of new and updated renderings for the project in anticipation of the LACPC meeting that highlight the multifaceted urban dynamic the firm has sought to articulate across the site. Site design for the project has been guided by a desire to have “quality architecture” populate public and semi-public open spaces while maintaining view corridors toward iconic downtown vistas. “These aren’t massive, big buildings,” Hanson explained as he described the articulated and setback low- and high-rise placeholder forms that show up in the renderings. Structures will ultimately be designed by a variety of architectural teams according to Hanson’s guidelines and will rise from a single story up to 454 feet in height. The plans envision a sizable portion of the site dedicated to housing a satellite campus for a local university as well as a 744-seat multiplex theater, Urbanize.la reported. The developers are also seeking to transform the complex into a so-called “sign district,” a local designation that allows for the installation of large-scale, electrified advertisement and mural billboards like those coming to nearby areas. The Skid Row–adjacent development does not feature an affordable housing component but will pay over $11 million toward a funded dedicated to preserving and creating new affordable housing in the neighborhood. The project will next be reviewed by the Los Angeles City Council for final approval. A timeline for the project’s implementation has not been released, but the developers envision a roughly 20-year construction timeline for the development, depending on market conditions.

Pei Cobb Freed to bring 33-story tower to L.A.’s Koreatown

A previously-reported mixed-use project slated for Los Angeles’s Koreatown neighborhood has added storied architects Pei Cobb Freed & Partners to its project team. According to a Los Angeles Department of City Planning report, the so-called Wilshire Gate project aims to bring a 200-key hotel, 250 condominium units, 21,320 square feet of restaurant and retail spaces, and 16,410 square feet of offices to the transit-adjacent site located at the intersection of Vermont Avenue and Wilshire Boulevard. The project includes 279 residential parking spaces as well as 204 parking stalls set aside for the commercial and office uses. The project will also include 250 long-term bicycle storage lockers as well as 25 short-term bicycle storage spaces for a grand total of 275 bicycle stalls. The current iteration of the tower proposes more affordable units and fewer bicycle parking stalls than previous versions of the development. The project’s residential component includes 22 affordable housing units set aside for “very-low income” residents; these units will allow developer Jia Long USA to receive a density bonus on the project, which boosts the tower’s overall possible height to 450 feet. The project will include landscape architecture services from YKD as well as executive architectural services from Archeon Group. Renderings for the project depict a conventional glass curtain wall–clad tower-over-podium arrangement with a gridded organization of projecting balconies occupying a central area of the tower’s west-facing facade. Documentation for the project specifies aluminum composite panels and storefront systems for ground floor and podium-level areas, with PPG low-E glass wrapping the majority of the tower. The tower will contain seven parking levels above two retail floors, with the hotel program rising above. A hotel amenity level will be located on the eighth and ninth floors of the complex. The development’s residential units will be located along the upper half of the building, with the uppermost floors occupied by a pair of penthouse levels and a rooftop amenity terrace. The project site is currently occupied by a pair of commercial structures that will be demolished to make way for the new development. The project will also be located adjacent to the recently-proposed Korean American National Museum by Gruen Associates. The project is scheduled to begin construction later this year and is expected to be complete sometime in 2019. The project will be up for review by the Los Angeles City Planning Commission on November 9, 2017.