Posts tagged with "Marmol Radziner":

Pei Cobb Freed & Partners breaks ground on renovation and addition to Yamasaki’s Century Plaza Hotel in L.A.

New York–based Pei Cobb Freed & Partners broke ground this month on a $2.5 billion development aimed at retrofitting and expanding the Minoru Yamasaki-designed Century Plaza Hotel in Los Angeles’s Century City business district. The project will convert the existing 16-story, 726-room hotel structure from 1966 into a luxury development with 394 high-end suites and 63 condominium residences. The elliptically-shaped hotel will be revamped by firms Gensler and Marmol Radziner, with the latter firm focusing on the historic restoration components of the project. The hotel has a rich history and was used as a stopover for visiting dignitaries during its heyday, including presidents Lyndon Johnson, Richard Nixon, and Ronald Reagan. The building was also the site of violently-quelled anti-Vietnam war protests in 1967. Pei Cobb Freed & Partners has designed a pair of 46-story, 600-foot tall Reuleaux triangle-shaped glass towers containing 290 luxury condominiums to flank the historic structure. Los Angeles—based architects Harley Ellis Devereaux are acting as Architect of Record for the residences contained within the glass-clad towers. The towers feature masonry-clad plinths at their base and are covered in repetitive, scalloped-edge balconies in deference to the Yamasaki-designed building’s distinctive facade. Rios Clementi Hale Studios (RCH Studios) is providing landscape design for the project; the firm aims to connect the new towers to the existing building via an elaborate series of landscaped shopping terraces. The shopping areas are designed to pull through the hotel’s interior from Avenue of the Stars, the major boulevard bounding the southern edge of the site. RCH Studios has laid the site out symmetrically around the center of the Yamasaki tower with wrap-around walkways and shaded areas connecting a proposed subway stop along the forthcoming Purple Line extension with the terraced areas at the feet of the towers. Plans for the redevelopment scheme were approved in 2013 as developers Next Century Associates—who originally wanted to demolish the 50-year old hotel—and preservationists clashed over the plans. The preservationists eventually won out when the National Trust for Historic Preservation named the hotel to its list of America’s 11 Most Endangered Historic Places for that year, bringing a public spotlight to the project and causing the developers to change course. Construction for the project is expected to finish in 2019.

Pei Cobb Freed & Partners add two towers to storied Century Plaza Hotel

The storied history of Los Angeles’s Century Plaza Hotel, the Minoru Yamasaki–designed stopover for presidents Lyndon Johnson, Richard Nixon, and Ronald Reagan and site of violently-quelled anti-Vietnam war protests, is finally gaining steam as the hotel’s $2.5 billion redevelopment moves toward a late summer groundbreaking. Plans for the redevelopment were approved in 2013 after a lengthy and controversial back and forth between developers, who wanted to demolish the 50-year-old hotel and replace it with a pair of 46-story Pei Cobb Freed & Partners–designed condo towers, and preservationists who wanted to see the landmark building saved. Preservationists won out in 2009, after Washington, D.C.–based National Trust for Historic Preservation announced that the hotel had been placed on their list of America’s 11 Most Endangered Historic Places for that year. In response, the developer tapped Marmol Radziner to preserve and renovate the hotel as part of the overall redevelopment of the 5.74 acre site. Pei Cobb Freed & Partners’ designs for the pair of Reuleaux triangle-shaped glass towers utilizes the space between them and the historic building to create an expansive public shopping courtyard that continues through the hotel’s lobby, connecting to foot traffic along Century City’s main thoroughfare, Avenue of the Stars. That street will host a new subway station when the forthcoming extension the Purple Line is completed in 2026. The site will also feature shopping areas and landscaped terraces designed by Rios Clementi Hale Studios along the perpendicular Constellation Boulevard. The towers themselves are wrapped in scalloped, glass-clad balconies, echoing Yamasaki’s designs for the Plaza Hotel, and will contain a total of 290 luxury condominiums. The existing structure, preserved as it may be, is to be thoroughly gutted from within, with the total number of rooms available dropping from 726 in the current building to 394 much larger suites in the remade structure; 63 condominium residences are also being incorporated into the designs.  The structure, to be listed as a City Historic-Cultural Monument, will feature 11,000 of the 94,000 square feet of overall retail and restaurant space in the development, while also retaining its existing 26,250 square foot ballroom. Gensler is acting as the executive architect for the project. An official construction timeline for the project has not been released.

AN 2015 Holiday Gift Guide: 16 design-heavy gifts sure to please everyone on your list

The holidays are quickly approaching, and AN has found the best architecture and design gifts to give (or receive) this season. Here are 16 must-have gifts for everyone on your list. The High Line Phaidon Get the inside scoop behind the inspiration and creation of New York’s notable elevated park, The High Line. This hefty tome includes 50 gatefolds and 570 illustrations. $75 Framed Benhaddou Laser Cut Paper Art Molly M Designs Dress up any office or home with this 16- by-16-inch, 3-D paper art masterpiece made of stacked laser-cut paper and framed with poplar wood. $182 Structo Table Curio Design Equipped with Bluetooth technology and both task and ambient light features, this table lamp will bring a pop of color to any office environment. $250 Mod Tablet 2  This Is Ground A handy carryall case for tablets helps you keep your tablet, phone, pens, stylus, glasses, cards, cash, notebooks, small items, open compartments, and cords organized during travel. It’s available in five colorways and also serves as a soft tablet stand. $299 Arbesser Blankets Hem These warm and snuggly throw blankets come in two patterns: Arch and Stripe. Arch is made of New Zealand wool, and Stripe is comprised of 100 percent New Zealand lambswool. Both come in four unique colorways. $120-$150 Measure Up Pendant Set Whitebeam Studio This matte and polished stainless-steel necklace features calipers, a ruler, and L square charms. $113 Courtesy TOM DIXON Brew Cafetiere and Espresso Cups Tom Dixon Coffee enthusiasts will enjoy the copper-finished, stainless-steel cafetiere and espresso cup set—the latest additionsto Tom Dixon’s Brew line of coffee products. Espresso Cups: $130; Cafetiere: $185 Camera Shoulder Bag WELCOMEPROJECTS Accessorize any outfit with this trendy twin-lens camera bag. Measuring four-and-a half inches long, four inches wide, and eight inches tall, this bag is suitable for all seasons. $760 Condiment Architecture Aldo Cibic Perfect for a table centerpiece, this nine-piece condiment set is made of bone china and features salt and pepper shakers, a vase, a toothpick holder, three ramekins, a pitcher, and a tray. $80 An Igloo On The Moon  Circa Press Let your young architect explore the many wonders of building with this historic and informative read by David Jenkins. $30 Plank Scarf Sam Jacob Studio Beat the cold this winter with this warm, twotoned scarf. Wood planks inspired the pattern and the yarn fringes mimic wood splinters. $38 Grid x Line Still Room The design of this foil-stamped stationary set includes a one-inch grid and two line weights. Grid x Line is available in six eye-catching foil colors and two paper types. $5.50-$9 Park Plate Collection notNeutral The National Mall in Washington, D.C., makes it table-side debut in this collection of plates, which includes images of Lincoln Memorial, Tidal Basin, Museum Core, and Capitol Hill. Individual: $50; Set: $180 White Brass Jewelry Collection Marmol Radziner Designed by Marmol Radziner Chief Jewelry Designer Robin Cottle, this fashion-forward jewelry line includes lightweight rings, three wrist cuffs, and earrings. $125 and up Ceramic Bowls and Glasses  Vipp Vipp has joined forces with Danish ceramicist Annemette Kissow to create a seven-piece, handcrafted collection consisting of a bowl, milk jug, egg ring, plate, espresso cup, coffee and teacup, and glasses. $35-$49 Livescribe Notebook Moleskine Moleskine partnered with Livescribe to create a high-tech notebook that turns handwritten notes into digital documents. The notebook works with Livescribe smartpens and the Livescribe+ app. $30

Marmol Radziner’s Past Forays into Guerrilla Architecture

An architectural Banksy lurks behind the well-tailored facade of Marmol Radziner. While the architecture and design-build practice is best known for its modern and high-end contemporary designs—they recently received two preservation awards one from the California Preservation Design Awards for the rehab of Richard Neutra’s 1955 Kronish House and the Pioneer in Modern Restoration & New Design Award from the Palm Springs Modern Committee—the firm recently revealed that it has a radical soul. In the late 1990s the firm created a series of what we would now call tactical urbanism interventions—acts of guerrilla architecture that drew attention to issues around Los Angeles. Ron Radziner spoke earlier this fall at the AIA San Francisco's Architecture and the City Festival about the works he called Heavy Trash, thus linking the practice to previously anonymous installations. The title of the project came from the possible violation they’d be tagged with if caught: littering. As if the artifacts of their urban actions were like old furniture or construction debris left on the curb. Performed over a series of years, the interventions took different forms. A bright orange stair and viewing platform to peep over hedges and gates was spotted around town, showing up in Los Feliz, Brentwood, and Park La Brea to draw attention to fortressed spaces in the city. One of the earliest projects was a metal staircase in West Los Angeles. It provided access to a public park that had been cordoned off with a tall metal fence in order to keep out the homeless. What’s interesting about the installation is not only did it constitute a kind of protest to NIMBY attitudes in the neighborhood, but also the design reflected the material investigations going on in the office. The step detail—metal C-sections welded to a steel tube—is not so dissimilar to a staircase in a Beverly Hills residence. Asked about what could be seen as a cognitive dissidence between high-end homes and street art, Radziner bridged the gap by stressing the firm’s hands-on approach across the spectrum. “The projects came out of our ability to make things so easily,” he recalled recently. The Heavy Trash actions brought together the firm’s designers and fabricators in the workshop, who volunteered their time to produce the pieces. When it came time to install, the teams would don reflective vests and put out orange cones to make things look “official.” Perhaps the most prescient of their civic additions was a series of billboards erected in Santa Monica announcing a fictitious “Aqua Line” metro link from downtown Los Angeles to the beach. Radziner joked that the action made a difference on reality, “If you look at the Expo Line graphics, they are aqua.”

Palm Springs Architecture & Design Center opens tomorrow, November 9th

Palm Springs Architecture and Design Center will officially open on November 9 with its inaugural exhibition, An Eloquent Modernist, E. Stewart Williams, Architect. Williams is a member of the group of early post-World War II architects that landed in the Coachella desert and helped turn the resort into a fledgling center of modern design mostly for vacation and retirement homes but also of schools, commercial buildings, and civic monuments. Williams fittingly designed the building that houses the new museum as the Santa Fe Federal Savings in 1961. It has now been entirely renovated by Marmol Radziner and seems to easily work as an exhibition space with an uninterrupted, unified and open plan that both contains space and opens up to the beautiful landscape beyond. The glass and steel building has many of the design details like brise-soleil, terrazzo flooring, sliding grates, and grills and columns that mark high modernism in southern California but are not usually seen in commercial structures like banks. In fact, it works perfectly for a museum and exhibition space devoted to design and architecture. The 13,000-square-foot facility will also house an archive and design collection in its basement level that allows it to create an ambitious facility devoted to design. The Palm Springs Art Museum, the parent of this new architecture and design center named the Edward Harris Pavilion, has assembled a talented and passionate team to direct the future of the center. A museum devoted simply to architecture might be hard to program after the first few exciting years but the managing director of the museum, J.R. Roberts, will open up its programming to include fashion, automobile design and other design disciples. The Executive Director of the Palm Springs Art Museum, the historian Dr. Steven Nash, has announced that the museum has been able to raise the $5.7 million (including the building purchase) it needs to renovate the bank and support several years of programming that is critical to running any sort of cultural facility in the 21st century. Finally, this team includes the accomplished daughter-in-law of Stewart Willams-Sidney who wil be the new museum's head curator. There are virtually no models for an architecture and design museum in this country so it will be fascinating to watch this facility in the next decade as it grows and develops.

Product> Trade Secrets: Architects Share Their Product Picks

From Andre Kikoski to Leo Marmol to David Mullman, top architects spill the beans on their favorite products—glazing, surfaces, and finish materials. Lasvit Liquidkristal A molded-glass sheet suitable for interior and exterior applications, the relief pattern is continuous between panels. “In Sophie’s restaurant at Saks Fifth Avenue in Chicago, we installed a wall of digitally-engineered Liquidkristal by Lasvit. The optical effects of cascading ripples of glass create playful reflections, painterly distortions, and elegant abstract patterns that are beautiful in their subtlety and striking in their boldness.” —Andre Kikoski, Andre Kikoski Architect, New York City lutron_1of2 Lutron Dorma Digitally controlled commercial lighting-control and monitoring system. Compatible with dimming ballasts. “Lutron and its EcoSystem node allows for multiple lighting atmospheres that enable us to create unique spatial environments, while saving our clients money on their electrical bills.” —Ricardo Alvarez-Diaz, Alvarez-Diaz & Villalon Architecture and Interior Design, Miami/San Juan duravit_HappyD2_2of2 Duravit Happy D.2 Offered in pedestal, console, and surface-mounted models; with or without tap platform. “We love the simplicity and rounded corners of the Happy D.2 sink from Duravit. It has enough presence to stand on its own as a wall-mounted unit, but can sit happily atop an elegant modern vanity as well. It’s our go-to sink!” —Susan Doban, Doban Architecture, New York City health_ceramics_1of2 Heath Ceramics Sun Valley Bronze Seven in-stock collections of field, trim, and dimensional tile; custom orders accepted. LEED eligible. “We love the handcrafted, high-quality products that Heath creates; its wonderful tile adorns many of our projects, and we share a set of core design principles that celebrates the efficiency and elegance of modern design.” —Leo Marmol, Marmol Radziner, Los Angeles luceplan-trama-parete-soffitto-2 Luceplan Trama Available as suspension and ceiling/wall model, in 20-inch or 25-inch diameter. Aluminum with polycarbonate diffuser. “The Luceplan Trama fixture gives lots of beautiful light and it’s amazingly easy to change the bulb. For us, it’s often the vendor that is as significant as the product; nothing is more important than good service and help when you need it.” —David Mullman, Mullman Seidman Architects, New York City vorwerk Vorwerk Re/Cover Green SPVC-free, roll-based floor covering. High slip-resistance. Offered in 30 solid colors and patterns. LEED eligible. “Engineered textiles sourced from sustainable materials—like the Re/Cover line by Vorwerk—is what made us select Relative Space as a design partner at Barclays Center.” —Ayumi Sugiyama, SHoP Architects, New York City nawkaw Nawkaw LiTHIUM Concrete and Masonry Stains Suitable for use on masonry and pre-cast concrete surfaces, the stain is offered in 40 colors, as well as metallic and reflective finishes. “For exteriors where we can’t match the brick color or where some stucco or coating has been applied to the masonry, one of products that we like a lot these days is LiTHIUM by Nawkaw. It’s similar to paint, but it’s not a film; it actually forms a chemical bond with the surface of the masonry.” —Jerry Caldari, Bromley Caldari Architects, New York City hansgrohe_CromaGreenShowerpipe Hansgrohe Croma Green Showerpipe Assembly includes both Raindance S 150 AIR Green 1-jet showerhead and Croma E 100 Green 3-jet handshower. “In hotel renovations, we see a trend to replace the traditional bathtub with a shower. The Croma Green Showerpipe, with its all-in-one, outside-the-wall design is easy to install and service—things which are always a concern, especially in the hospitality sector. The handshower is not only great for guest bathing, but also ideal from a housekeeping perspective.” —Foreman Arden Rodgers, TVS Design, Atlanta

Developer Gone Good? Century Plaza Towers Get Approval

Well, it happened. After years of strife over the project, the Los Angeles City Council on Tuesday approved the $2 billion, 1.5 million square foot redevelopment of the Century Plaza Hotel in Century City. Back in 2009 the developer, Next Century Associates, threatened to tear down Minoru Yamasaki's curving midcentury Hyatt Regency Century Plaza Hotel to make way for the project. But  a parade of preservationists, including the LA Conservancy and Diane Keaton, stood in their way. The result: a compromise in which the hotel would be preserved by Marmol Radziner and surrounded by two three-sided, 46-story residential towers by Pei Cobb Freed as well as a 100,000-square-foot retail plaza and over two acres of public open space by Rios Clementi Hale. The executive architect is Gensler. City Council certified the scheme's Environmental Impact Report and approved a 15-year development agreement. Let the construction begin on another major Los Angeles development. Momentum is building.

A Giant Loom On Neutra VDL Roof? Let Us Explain..

Richard Neutra's VDL House in Silver Lake has been fitted with a new rooftop installation called Fort da Sampler, by Mexico City-based artist Santiago Borja.  The project is centered around a temporary textile loom literally made out of the famous house's horizontal rooftop steel beams. Now THAT's a new use for architecture... On the loom the artist, along with the help of a crafstwoman from Chiapas, created a woolen artwork fitted with colorful, Myan-inspired symbols. The project is the first art installation at the home, and curator Sarah Lorenzen says she hopes there are more to follow. She also shares the news that the first of three phases of renovation at the house—centered on the roof and the adjacent garden unit— has been completed pro bono by LA firm Marmol Radziner. This includes new parapets, new plaster, repaired trellises, a partially waterproofed and resealed roof, new planters and landscaping, and the transfer of all plumbing to the inside of the building. Future phases will include site drainage, a new roof deck, more waterproofing, repaired windows, and refinished interiors.