Posts tagged with "Madison Square Park":

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Reflecting pond in Madison Square Park will be transformed by public installation

A series of kiln-fired porcelain, bent wood and cast iron sculptures by New York-based artist Arlene Shechet will adorn the drained reflecting pool in the north of Madison Square Park. Shechet’s public art show, titled Round and Round, will be on view from September 14 to April 28, 2019. The name Round and Round is analogous of the circular shape of the reflecting pond, which is the site for the art pieces. It also refers to the flow of informal conversation Shechet hopes to inspire in the audience. By adding seats and crafting the park’s environment, Shechet wishes to create a gathering place in the nature that encourages interactions between people. The artist’s first site-specific, public art project will transform the emptied pond into an outdoor amphitheater with elaborate sculptures and urban furniture. Informed by her fascination with 18th century decorative arts, her statues will explore motifs such as lions and birds. She also responds to existing objects in the park, such as the Admiral David Glasgow Garragut Monument. Arlene Shechet is a sculptor based in New York City and the Hudson Valley who experiments with different materials, including plaster, paper and clay, and reflects on ideas like chance and elements of Zen Buddhist thinking. She recently exhibited at the Phillips Collection in Washington, D.C. and the Institute of Contemporary Art in Boston. Arlene Shechet said: “My hope has been to reimagine the hardscape of the Park with delight and surprise. New Yorkers rely on the sidewalks, the pavement, and the street as the core of their urban lives. Round and Round becomes a lively and human amphitheater, softening the hardscape through sculptural intervention evocative of 18th century garden landscapes.”
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Diana Al-Hadid’s delirious Madison Square Park installations are up for the summer

Delirious Matter, the 36th season of outdoor art at Madison Square Park, is now officially open, and park goers can discover ruined busts, dripping walls, and a mountainous, 14-foot-tall sculpture plunked in the northern fountain. AN recently had the opportunity to tour the park with Delirious Matter artist Diana Al-Hadid and discuss both the current installation and her upcoming exhibition at the Bronx Museum of the Arts. Citadel, the voluminous fountain sculpture, was inspired by Hans Memling’s Allegory of Chastity, a 15th-century painting of a woman emerging from a mountain. Painting plays an intrinsic part in Al-Hadid’s process; Citadel started as two life-sized paintings, and Al-Hadid cut and welded steel rods to follow her design, later reinforcing it for stability. The dripping “snow caps” of aluminum foil and gypsum lend some solidity to a structure that would otherwise be made of voids. Continuing the dichotomy between new materials and old techniques and void and solid form, three female Synonym busts have been scattered around the park. The headless figures, resembling hollowed-out classical antiquities, are elevated on plinths but still totally accessible to the public and were created by dripping a gypsum polymer mixture over Al-Hadid’s existing works, Antonym. At the park’s center is the anchor of the installation, a hedged-in “room” created by opposing walls of dripped gypsum and paint. Gravida, named for the Roman god Mars Gradivus, is 36 feet long and arched to create an entrance way and directly frames the opposing wall, a 22-foot-long rising peak that also references Allegory of Chastity. The forms were originally painted on the wall and reinforced from behind after they were peeled off. Delirious Matter is Al-Hadid’s first outdoor installation, which necessitated thinking about how the sculptures would interplay with the landscaping, the elements, and the demands of the public. For a more traditional example of Al-Hadid’s work, the Bronx Museum of the Arts will be running a sister Delirious Matter show from July 18 through October 14, with the massive Nolli’s Orders sculpture at its center. A collection of voids and twisting figures supported by iconic pieces of Roman architecture, Nolli’s Orders references the 1748 survey of Rome by Giambattista Nolli. While the 2012 sculpture doesn’t correlate directly to Nolli’s map, Al-Hadid drew on the poses and depictions of public and private spaces in the city when planning Nolli’s Orders. The Madison Square Park show will run through September 3, 2018.
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Deliriously dripping sculptures are coming to Madison Square Park

Just in time for spring, the 36th season of outdoor art at Madison Square Park will bring architectural landscapes, dissolving mythological figures, and eroding monuments to the lower Manhattan park. Diana Al-Hadid’s Delirious Matter will weave feminine narratives with Modernist thinking and scatter “ruins” for park-goers to discover come May 7, 2018. The Aleppo-born artist is well known for using casting techniques and materials that result in ethereal, yet surprisingly strong, works, and Delirious Matter is no exception. Six sculptures will be on display, and all of them resemble eroded organic forms, produced through pouring colored polymer gypsum on a surface, peeling it off and reinforcing the structure with a fiberglass coating. Al-Hadid has called the technique “a blend between fresco and tapestry.” “I was educated by Modernist instructors in the Midwest, but also was raised in an Islamic household with a culture that very much prizes narrative and folklore,” explained Al-Hadid. On the park’s Oval Lawn, Al-Hadid will lay down a set of 14-foot-tall porous walls that fade into the hedges, one 36 feet long and the other 22 feet, allowing visitors to explore the gaps in the hard scaffolding. The first wall, Gravida, evokes the Roman god Mars Gradivus, while the second references Allegory of Chastity by Hans Memling, a 15th century painting where a woman arises from a mountain, her clothing and body becoming one with the rocky landscape. Three female figures in repose, all of them missing heads and sitting on plinths, will be scattered around the rest of the park. The three sculptures that make up Synonym all hover in midair, dripped over invisible, destroyed classical statues, and are seemingly supported by nothing more than the extra fluid that’s spilled over the sides. A final sculpture, also referencing Allegory of Chastity, will be installed in the park’s reflecting pool. Delirious Matter is Al-Hadid’s attempt to blend sculpture and plant matter for the first time in her career, much in the same way her work combines contemporary fabrication methods to reinterpret historical paintings and sculptures; it also represents her largest show to date. Delirious Matter was made possible in part by a $35,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Arts, and through the support of the Madison Square Park Conservancy. The show will run in tandem with the Diana Al-Hadid: Delirious Matter at the Bronx Museum of the Arts from July 18 through October 14, 2018, while Al-Hadid’s melting mashups in the park will be on display until September 3, 2018.
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Art Installation Casts NYC Water Towers in Infinite Light

By the New York Times' estimate, there are some 12,000–17,000 water towers currently in use within New York City. Frequent hosts for sediment and even harmful bacteria, Ivan Navarro has found a new substance for filling these ubiquitous components of the city skyline: neon light. The material is the Chilean artist's preferred medium, and in a new installation in Madison Square Park he has rendered the words "we" "me", and a ladder on the interiors of three separate water towers. Elevated eight feet above the ground, each of the towers is devoted to one of the aforementioned images. Viewed from below the images appear to extend into infinity. The piece is obtusely title This Land is Your Land (by way of Woody Guthrie) and will be on display through April 13.  
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Orly Genger’s “Red, Yellow and Blue” Adds Bands of Color to Madison Square Park

Yesterday, brilliant sunshine, a gentle spring breeze, and 65 degree weather set the scene for the inauguration ceremony of Orly Genger’s remarkable new art installation, titled Red, Yellow and Blue, in Madison Square Park. As you navigate your way through the park you will find yourself surrounded by a fanciful scene, as vibrant undulating walls arch into blossoming trees, spill onto lush lawns, and unfurl all around you. “Orly Genger has woven her magic throughout the park,” said Mayor Bloomberg, who spoke at the inauguration ceremony. The large-scale project was installed as the latest chapter of Mad. Sq. Art, a public contemporary arts program presented by Madison Square Park Conservancy that aims to revitalize the park as well as the surrounding community. “[Red Yellow and Blue] is both innovative and environmentally sustainable. It is projects like this that are a big part of what gives New York City our identity and attracts visitors to our city,” said Bloomberg. The intense physical labor that was involved in the crafting of the massive rope-walls that enliven the park’s verdant lawns is as incredible as the end product. Genger and her team of assistants spent 9,000 hours in a Brooklyn warehouse tirelessly hand-knotting 1.4 million feet (equaling almost twenty times the length of Manhattan) of re-purposed nautical rope that was collected from lobster fishermen working along the New England coastline. The thick bands of hand-knotted, or “knit,” rope were painted using 4,000 gallons of red, yellow, and blue paint, and then transported to Madison Square Park where they were layered one on top of the other using steel supports. Three individual structures were then fashioned on-site to respond to the landscape of Madison Square Park. Genger’s work communicates an interesting paradox. The artist implemented a historically “feminine,” domestic practice of knitting to create burly structures that dramatically transform the park and immediately weave visitors into this dynamic outdoor environment. “For Madison Square Park I wanted to create a work that would impress in scale and still engage rather than intimidate… The tradition of knitting carries the sharing of stories and the installation draws on that idea. The repurposed rope brings with it the stories of different locations and by knotting it, a space is created for the words and thoughts of viewers in New York City to complete the work, creating a silent dialogue that waves along,” explained Genger in a statement. Red, Yellow and Blue is the New-York based artist's largest work to date. The installation will be on view at Madison Square Park all throughout the summer, until September 8, 2013, after which Genger will re-imagine the installation to fit Massachusetts’s deCordova Sculpture Park.
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Buckyball Lights Up Again in Madison Square Park

New York-based artist Leo Villareal is creatively illuminating the constructed form. In Madison Square Park, Villareal's LED light-up geodesic dome, Buckyball, stands tall, undamaged but unlit after Hurricane Sandy. The Madison Square Park Conservancy told AN that the lights are expected to be back on tonight. And soon, Villareal also plans to light-up a far larger construction on the West coast: the San Francisco Bay Bridge. The 30-foot tall Buckyball consists of two nested spheres created by a series of adjoining pentagons and hexagons resting atop a large platform. Each sphere is built using LED tube lights over a metal frame. Random mathematical sequencing allows the tubes to change color and create over 16 million different shades across the geometric sculpture. The spheres will be on view in Madison Square Park through February 1, 2013 and is typically lit up from dusk till dawn. The sculpture was powered down during the recent storms. Meanwhile, Villareal is also working on his next project titled The Bay Lights. This light installation will cover the San Francisco Bay Bridge, creating light patterns visible to residents on either side.  Meant to celebrate the bridge's anticipated 2013 East Span completion, 25,000 white LED lights will be placed along its 1.8 mile span and climb up the 500-foot high steel cables. Shifting light patterns will be displayed from dusk until midnight for two years, visible from afar but hidden from crossing drivers.  The grand lighting scheme is planned to open in early 2013.
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A Thousand Drops of Light in Madison Square Park

Upon first stumbling across this massive array of 2,000 LED lights encased in standard light bulbs in Madison Square Park a few weeks ago, I thought holiday decoration had come a little early to the Flatiron's front yard, but as shadowed figures began moving across the field of light, it became apparent that this installation by artist Jim Campbell was something special. Situated on Madison Square Park's Oval Lawn, Scattered Light consists of a three-dimensional grid of light spanning roughly 80 feet by 16 feet and standing 20 feet tall. When viewing the installation from the front, programmed LED lights flicker in sequence to create the illusion of shadows walking through the park. Moving around the artwork causes the image to blue and abstract as the grid moves in and out of focus. Scattered Light video by specialkrb / YT: Scattered Light video by Craig Dorety / Vimeo: The installation is one of three public art projects by Jim Campbell on display in Madison Square Park. Here's more information about the other two from the Madison Square Park Conservancy:
Broken Window, the second installation, will be situated near the main entrance to Madison Square Park at 23rd Street and Fifth Avenue. An array of LEDs encased in a glass-brick wall (70”h x 70”w x 10”d) will create illuminated images that appear to glide across the glass plane, reflecting the movements of the city around them and echoing the aesthetic poetry of the Scattered Lightinstallation. Situated on the eastern lawn adjacent to Madison Avenue between 24th and 25th street, Voices in the Subway Station, the third installation, will feature LEDs encased in two dozen glass tablets (14” x 18” each) arrayed across the lawn at ground level. The light pulses emanating from each tablet will be rhythmically modulated to represent the voices of individual travelers as recorded in conversation on a subway platform, combining to create a visual symphony rendered in light.
Each of the three installations offers an abstracted experience drawn from the urban environment that's at once distant but right at home and it's worth an evening stroll through the park to experience them for yourself. The installations will be on display through February 2011. Interview with Jim Campbell from Switched: Voices in the Subway video by Craig Dorety / Vimeo: Broken Window video by lessthanrita / YT:
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One For the Books

In this age of blogs and 24-hour cable news, rarely does breaking news come from an old-fashioned hardcover book. But that is exactly what happened with Studio Daniel Libeskind's New York Tower, which can be seen above (and which we also talked to the architect about earlier today). Ever since the project leaked onto the Internet last year, the real estate blogosphere has been following every rumor and murmur about the project. But it took the November 18 publication of Counterpoint, Libeskind's latest monograph, for the world to get its first look. Indeed it wasn't until last week, when New York architecture critic Justin Davidson pointed out the project's publication therein, that people started to take notice. Fortunately for us, we happened to have a review copy lying around the office, from which these images were taken. But before we go, one caveat. The developer refused to release any of these images--except for the one we posted of the terrace gardens--when we requested them. "They were made at least a year ago, for publication purposes, and no longer reflect the current state of the project," Lloyd Kaplan, spokesperson for developer Elad Properties, told us. Still, they provide the most complete picture of the project yet. And, even if it does change, as long as it looks half this good, we think everyone will be happy. Also, if you care to learn more about the book (and, we hope, the tower), Liebeskind and Paul Goldberger--his interlocutor for Counterpoint--will be giving a talk at the Center for Architecture on December 10.