Posts tagged with "Los Angeles":

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Getting Real In The SCI-Arc Parking Lot: Pavilion Construction Heating Up

While you might not make a habit of visiting parking lots for the fun of it, if you haven't been to SCI-Arc's parking lot lately, you're missing out. Installations dot a big chunk of the concrete expanse, including Oyler Wu's billowing Storm Cloud installation, which was built for the school's recent graduation; the steel frame of P-A-T-T-E-R-N-S's gigantic League of Shadows installation, which will be done by September, and the wooden frame of DALE, SCI-Arc and Caltech's entry for the Solar Decathalon, which is being held this year at the Orange County Great Park. DALE, which measures about 600 square feet, has now been outfitted with steel tracks so that it can open up on wheels and provide outdoor spaces, including a small yard and even a reflecting pool. The furniture inside the net-zero home will also move to create varied spatial arrangements and configurations. DALE will be completed by September, then it will be reassembled at the Great Park by October 3. Some staff and students have complained about the lack of parking at SCI-Arc right now, which is understandable. But we hope this will become a regular attraction. Maybe they'll build a parking structure and make the whole parking lot an architectural display space someday? 
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June 21–23> Michael Graves to Keynote Dwell on Design in Los Angeles Next Week

From June 21 – 23 architecture and design professionals will flock to the Los Angeles Convention Center for the Dwell on Design tradeshow. With over 2,000 products, 400 exhibitors, 150 speakers, and 30,000 expected attendees, this highly anticipated three-day affair has easily become America’s largest design event. The exhibition features 20,000 square feet of space filled with prefabricated structures that highlight the most important aspects of contemporary design. The show is divided into various sections including Dwell Outdoor, the Tech Zone, the Modern Family Lounge, Furniture, and Kitchen & Bath and features renowned leaders in industrial, home appliance, and furniture design such as Miele, Kohler, GE Monogram, Resource Furniture, and Marimekko. Dwell Media has put together an exciting program for this year’s show, featuring a motivating Keynote Address to be delivered by architect and industrial designer, Michael Graves, who will share how his perspective on design and quality of life was altered as a result of his life-changing illness. Other highlights include an impressive lineup of speakers and panel discussions, the AIA/LA Restaurant Design Awards, the 3rd annual Dwell on Design Awards, two days of Green Car test drives, and Design Clinics that will offer visitors practical advice on architecture, landscape, and inerior design. While the show provides design lovers with numerous reasons to attend, the main attraction remains the prefabs that fill the show floor. Designers construct outdoor environments, complete with fresh greenery and lush vegetation, in an indoor setting. Some of this year’s most prominent exhibitors include Sett Studio, whose design philosophy holds that maximum efficiency can be achieved through a union of design, material, and space, Piece Homes, which balances an eco-friendly home with personal taste, and LivingHomes, which address environmental and urban issues through portable building. Attendees can walk through garden pods, trailers, and outdoor lounges and have their questions answered by  The Association of Professional Landscape Designers (APLD). VIP_Amanda Dameron_Bryan Cranston_etc For more information visit: http://www.dwellondesign.com/  
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On View> "A. Quincy Jones: Building for Better Living" at LA's Hammer Museum

A. Quincy Jones: Building for Better Living The Hammer Museum 10899 Wilshire Boulevard Los Angeles Through September 8 Archibald Quincy Jones (1913–1979) was a Los Angeles–based architect known both for the glamorous homes he designed for actors like Gary Cooper, as well as his dedication to the redevelopment of middle-class housing using effective, innovative, and sustainable building methods during the 1950s and 60s. His 5,000 built projects were centered on the premise of “better living” and “greenbelt planning.” He experimented with materials like plywood, steel, and masonry block construction and intentionally built in locations where his buildings would have access to natural light, air, ventilation, and views. This exhibition is presented as a part of Pacific Standard Time Presents: Modern Architecture in L.A. The documentation on view—including original architectural drawings taken from the architect’s personal and professional archive, a case study house model, and vintage photographs—highlights a variety of Jones’s projects, including community developments, churches, libraries, restaurants, residential homes, work spaces, and schools.
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Plan Zumthor: Will Second Time Be the Charm for LACMA Redo?

The rumor-mill has been churning non-stop over LACMA director Michael Govan’s and architect Peter Zumthor’s plans for the museum. Basically it looks like they are planning to take LACMA apart and start over; an effort that failed when attempted by Rem Koolhaas and OMA back in the early 2000s. The full scope of the plans will be unveiled in June, with LACMA’s exhibition The Presence of the Past: Peter Zumthor Reconsiders LACMA. But for now we’ve gleaned that under Zumthor’s plan, not only would there be a new indoor/outdoor art park, but four of the museum’s midcentury structures would be replaced by “curvaceous modern glass structures.” That basically includes everything but the Bruce Goff pavilion and Renzo Piano’s new structures. Let’s see if the second time’s the charm.
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Los Angeles Architect Planning Best Play Structure Ever

LA architect Shawn Keltner, whose day job is lead designer at Los Angeles-based  tecDESIGN (the design branch of Swiss firm tecARCHITECTURE), is doing some important work on the side: developing a wondrous play structure for his two young daughters, Kelty and Kree, aged five and two. The irregularly-shaped, 50-square-foot building, which he will put together on his family's sloped lot in Glassell Park, will be made out of home-made SIPs and clad with Hardie Panels and polycarbonate. Because of the site's slope, the structure will be raised over the ground, its front side supported via a pier and its back side dug into the hill. It will have a deck in back. Many other angles are meant, said Keltner, to make it,"just really fun," giving it an interesting profile on the hillside and a uniqueness in a conventional neighborhood. "My daughter Kelty is hoping for a bright red exterior, with orange and yellow accents," added Keltner. "I'm not sure how that will work, but I am collaborating with my five-year-old so I might not have much choice in the matter." The discerning client ("she's cool with the outside but is very set on what she wants on the inside," noted Keltner) has insisted on two interior rooms—a black and white striped conversation room and a light brown reading room, where she can get a break from her younger sister. Those designs are still in negotiation. The structure will also double as a sleeping area for guests and family—A platform will fold down from the interior walls creating space for a full size bed. It will have running water and a small sink and, also a client must, a faux oven and cooktop. "I'm hoping to get it up pretty soon so I can keep them busy over the summer," added Keltner.
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Eavesdrop> MOCA Drama...It's Still Not Over

Just when we thought the troubled MOCA New Sculpturalism exhibition was finally wrapping up relatively smoothly... There has been no official confirmation, but we've heard from several people involved with the show that Thom Mayne and his firm Morphosis are now leading the show, not curator Christopher Mount. Participants confirm that emails are now coming from Morphosis, not MOCA, while the show's assistant curator Johanna Vandemoortele last week sent out an email that she had already departed from MOCA. Mount was not available for comment, but Mayne's spokesperson Legier Stahl noted: "It is a collective, community effort. We are just helping to facilitate." Rumor has it that Mayne is considering adding more participants, including Wes Jones, John Enright, Hitoshi Abe, and Qingyun. Stay tuned as the saga continues.
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Oyler Wu, The Graduation Experts, Design Another Pavilion for SCI-Arc

After creating their 2011 and 2012 graduation pavilions for SCI-Arc, Oyler Wu has once again produced a striking structure LA-based school, this time on the occasion of their 4oth anniversary. Dubbed the Storm Cloud pavilion, the structure salvages the existing steel from the 2011 Netscape,  which served as the school’s graduation pavilion two years ago. Looking at Storm Cloud, one can hardly tell it shares much of the bones that made up the older pavilion. “Since the event is in the evening, we wanted create a canopy that has a lantern-like effect when lit, so we came up with the idea of creating funnels that we can place lighting inside of them,” said Oyler Wu principal Jenny Wu of the pavilion’s inspiration. Though the idea was elegant, the couple was challenged by the nature of the stretch fabric itself, which didn’t lend itself to shapes other than a simple rectangle or circle. Oyler Wu overcame this challenge by adopting a “splat” strategy. “This allows us not to have to pattern it,” writes Wu. Instead of cutting uniform, predictable shapes, the pair cut waves at the bottom of the fabric and stretched over the steel structure. Wu provided a clarifying seam drawing explaining her point. The result was a dynamic shade structure that undulated at its based and stretched taut meeting the sky. Lit with colored lights at night, the pavilion was a fitting structure to emphasize the school’s experimental bent and couple’s continually surprising investigations into form.
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Petition Launched To Save MOCA's New Sculpturalism Exhibition

Los Angeles architect Arshia Mahmoodi, founder of the firm VOID, has launched an online petition to try to help save the troubled exhibition, A New Sculpturalism: Contemporary Architecture in Southern California at MOCA. The show, scheduled for a June 2nd opening, is currently in a holding pattern, and its curator Christopher Mount told AN he feared it would be cancelled. Mount blames mismanagement at MOCA, while several news reports have pointed to general apprehension about the show, and the recent withdrawal of Frank Gehry. Mahmoodi released the petition—directed to MOCA director Jeffrey Deitch—yesterday. "The cultural and educational significance of this exhibition certainly outweighs any hindrance surrounding it," wrote Mahmoodi in the petition, which has been circulating in the local architecture community. Mahmoodi told AN she was inspired by Mount's call, documented in the LA Times, for a "community uprising" to keep the exhibition alive. She added that she doesn't want the petition to be "antagonistic or condemning in any form," since there is still so much haziness around the situation. "The show," she wrote, "is quite possibly the most important exhibition among the many curated under the Pacific Standard Time umbrella, as it is to provide a front for the emergent architecture in Southern California rather than the familiar historical or subjective curatorial discourse." The last pitch to Deitch: "We respectfully urge you to champion this mission to its resolution and ensure you that the support of the undersigned for this exhibition is unwavering." As of this posting the petition had 42 supporters. "It could act as a referendum of sorts to show the decision makers who and how many care about this," Mahmoodi told AN.
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Event> Celebrate: The Journey at LA's A+D Museum

What: Gala / Celebrate: The Journey When: Saturday, May 11, 7:00 to 11:00 PM Where: Architecture and Design Museum, Los Angeles (5900 Wilshire on LA’s Museum Row) Join AN, a media sponsor for the annual A + D Fundraiser and Gala, this Saturday for CELEBRATE: THE JOURNEY. The event at The Architecture and Design Museum of Los Angeles connects the design industry with innovators to acknowledge the creative journey that kindles preeminent design. The night’s main focus will center on one-of-a-kind carry-ons created by renowned architects and designers such as traditional train cases, modern day satchels and ultramodern jet-paks. Custom carry-on designers include Adams Morioka, Gensler, Dan Meis and Cristobal Valecillos among others. The celebrations will consist of several curated silent auctions, intercontinental cuisine, music, drink and much more. Chris Fox ‘Jet Packs’ and Pan AM Vintage Uniforms will provide special presentations while Raul Campos will DJ. Over 600 people attended CELEBRATE 2012 and 2013’s event will be bigger and better! Tickets are available for purchase online and CELEBRATE: THE JOURNEY silent auction items are accessible for preview and bids.
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On View> OVERDRIVE: LA Constructs the Future, 1940-1990

overdrive_la_01 OVERDRIVE: LA Constructs the Future, 1940-1990 The J. Paul Getty Museum Los Angeles Through July 21 Gleaming cars speeding down an intricate freeway system, flashy movie theatres, quirky coffee shops, sleek corporate towers and residential spaces, drive-in churches, the infamous Hollywood sign, LAX Airport (above), and a lucrative petroleum industry are just some of the many impressive characteristics associated with the rich culture of Los Angeles. This exhibition at The J. Paul Getty Museum explores a metropolis that remained in “overdrive” throughout the 20th century, implementing cutting-edge architectural design to effectively respond to civic, environmental, and socioeconomic challenges that plagued the city. In just 50 years, the city rapidly evolved into one the most influential industrial, creative, and economic capitals in the world. Through drawings, photographs, models, animations, oral histories, and ephemera, the exhibition celebrates the notable transformation of the city of Los Angeles from 1940–1990.
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Where's the Money, MOCA? Questions surround the possible cancellation of A New Sculpturalism

The intrigue continues at MOCA, whose upcoming show A New Sculpturalism: Contemporary Architecture in Southern California, is close to being cancelled, according to multiple sources. The show's curator Christopher Mount has told AN that Frank Gehry’s withdrawal is not the cause for the exhibition’s possible demise, as was suggested yesterday in the Los Angeles Times. The real reason, he said: MOCA director Jeffrey Deitch, who halted installation of the show a few weeks ago, claiming that money for the undertaking had run out. Mount, however, says there is plenty of money left in the show’s budget. The New Sculpturalism show, scheduled for a June 2 opening, received a $445,000 grant from the Getty Foundation (made up of a $170,000 research grant and a $275,000 implementation grant) as part of its Pacific Standard Time Presents: Modern Architecture in Los Angeles initiative. It also received a $15,000 grant from the Graham foundation as well as other smaller private contributions. Mount said that he has only spent $280,000 so far, and that the total cost of the show will be about $340,000. That leaves over $100,000 remaining. “The Frank Gehry thing is a total smokescreen,” said Mount, of the LA Times report, which pointed out that the show was being jeopardized because of that architect’s recent refusal to take part. Mount did acknowledge that Gehry had issues with the show (as have some others in the architecture community), and that he wasn't happy with the amount of pages dedicated to him in the exhibition catalogue, but he said that was irrelevant.  “I don’t know where the money went. Somebody has to ask Jeffrey,” said Mount.  He added: “I think it’s appalling that a museum can’t support an exhibition that explores some of the most important architecture of the last 25 years. I’ve never seen a show with all of its money raised just stop construction.” It is still unclear what Deitch or MOCA’s position is on the show’s status, or if the Getty, which donated most of the funds for the show, will step in to resolve the matter. The Getty has refused to comment, while efforts to reach MOCA on the record have thus far not been returned. Mount also acknowledged that Thom Mayne and others involved with the show have investigated moving it to another space, although he does not support such a move. "I'll certainly be disappointed if this comes to pass," said Neil Denari, who was scheduled to be part of the show, and noted that he has had doubts about MOCA's dedication to architecture. "I looked at it as a way to raise the consciousness of architecture in general.  This raises questions about the ability to have a public discourse about architecture, which I think LA desperately needs." Disclosure: Sam Lubell was an on the advisory board for A New Sculpturalism: Contemporary Architecture in Southern California.
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LACMA Transformation Coming Into Focus

The Wall Street Journal recently published a confirmation of two things we've been hearing whispers of for years: One, Michael Govan is more of a builder than a museum director; and two, that Govan and Peter Zumthor are planning to basically take LACMA apart and start over. The full scope of the plans will be unveiled in June, with LACMA's exhibition, The Presence of the Past: Peter Zumthor Reconsiders LACMA. But for now the story has gleaned that under Zumthor's plan, four of the museum's midcentury structures will be replaced by "curvaceous modern glass structures." Other new pieces will include an "indoor-outdoor art park," while many of the new glass facilities—which could allow art to be seen from Wilshire Boulevard—will be contained under one roof and be covered with solar panels. As much as 80 percent of the art, Govan hopes, will be on display to the public. Stay tuned, Angelenos. It's about to get crazy out here.