Posts tagged with "long durational performance art":

ReActor: Weekend Performance

Ghent, NY, May 22, 2018 – Architect Alex Schweder returns to the Architecture Fields at Art Omi for a weekend-long performance in the spinning, tilting, futuristic home ReActor on June 9, 2018. ReActor is a 44-foot by 8-foot habitable sculpture that rotates 360-degrees atop a 15-foot concrete column in response to its inhabitants' movements, exterior forces, and interior conditions, making visible the intimate relationship between architecture and its occupants. The work is a collaboration between architect Alex Schweder and artist Ward Shelley, and was erected in Architecture Field 01 at Art Omi in June 2016. Since its completion, the pair have inhabited ReActor over a series of three durational performances; during these activations, onlookers are invited to observe and interact with the residents as they navigate the ever-shifting structure as it reacts to atmospheric conditions. Schweder has described their approach as “performance architecture,” and stated that “our relationship with our audiences is a bit different from many performance art works in that we have conversations about the work with them.” For this latest performance, Schweder will be joined on Saturday, June 9 by Oberon Sinclair, and on Sunday, June 10 by Sean Anderson. This two-day tenancy of ReActor concludes at 5 p.m. on June 10.

About Schweder + Shelley

Alex Schweder and Ward Shelly met while fellows at the American Academy in Rome in 2005. They first collaborated on Flatland at the Sculpture Center in 2007, a piece that focused their interests toward performative social architecture. The duo went on to produce Stability in for Lawrimore Project, Seattle (2009); In Orbit, at Pierogi Gallery's Boiler Room (2014), and Counterweight Roommate at SCOPE, Basel, Switzerland (2011), acquired by The Museum of Modern Art for its permanent collection. ReActor is their first outdoor piece, and it further explores how constructed environments affect relationship dynamics, and how relationships impact the constructed environment.

About Alex Schweder

Alex Schweder works with architecture and performance art to complicate the distinction between occupying subjects and occupied objects. These projects include Practise Architecture at Tate Britain, Its Form Follows Your Performance at Berlin’s Magnus Muller, A Sac of Rooms All Day Long at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Roomograph at the deCordova Museum, and The Rise and Fall in the Marrakech Biennial. The Pollock Krasner and Graham Foundations have funded his projects. Schweder is the author of "Stalls Between Walls," included in Ladies and Gents, the Gendering of Public Toilets and "Performance Architecture," included in Urban Interiors. He is a three-time artist in residence at the Kohler Company and was in residence at the Chinati Foundation, Marfa Contemporary, and American Academy in Rome. Schweder has been a guest professor at the Southern California Institute of Architecture, Pratt Institute, and the Institute for Art and Architecture in Vienna.

About Art Omi: Architecture

The Art Omi: Architecture program is conceived to facilitate projects exploring the intersection of architecture, art and landscape by architects. Nestled within the campus of Art Omi, this program offers pristine, 60-acre fields designated to cultivate the production of physical structures such as pavilions, installations, landscape interventions, and constructed environments. In addition, the program encourages the integration of all varieties of related media, ideas, propositions and curated exhibitions in a landscaped setting. Since January 2016, Manhattan-based architect Warren James has served as the program’s Director.

About Art Omi

Art Omi is a not-for-profit arts organization offering world-class public exhibitions, arts events, education programming, and international residency programs for visual artists, writers, translators, musicians, and dancers. Situated in the scenic Hudson Valley in Ghent, New York, Art Omi’s grounds are comprised of 300-acres of rolling farmland, wetlands and woodlands. The Fields Sculpture Park presents the works of internationally recognized contemporary and modern artists, offering the unique possibility to experience a wide range of large-scale works in a singular outdoor environment. The Fields offers more than sixty works of art and architecture on view, with several pieces added or exchanged every year. More information at artomi.org
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Marina Abramovic cancels building project and leaves funders in the lurch

Update: Marina Abramovic responded to the allegations reported in this article. That response is available here After failing to meet its $31 million funding goal, performance artist Marina Abramovic recently announced the cancellation of her Hudson, New York-based Marina Abramović Institute for the Preservation of Performance Art (MAI). Designed by OMA partners Shohei Shigematsu and Rem Koolhaas, the 33,000-square-foot space would have led visitors through guided tours of the experimental performances that Abramovic is famous for. Originally estimated at $8 million, the project’s costs ballooned over the years to $31 million, according to the New York Post. Speaking at London’s Serpentine Sackler Gallery in October, Abramovic conceded that the project had grown too expensive to proceed with. “I, as a performance artist, could never raise $31 million unless some amazing guy from the Emirates [came forward] or some Russian who just wrote a cheque because he believed in me. But in real life, that doesn’t happen,” she said. With the cancellation of the MAI, questions have arisen over the $2.2 million already raised for the project. After a successful 2013 Kickstarter campaign raised $660,000, the artist pulled in another $1.5 million through private donations. According to the Post, a spokesperson for Abramovic has stated that any money raised has been paid to OMA. “The funds were raised not for the renovation itself but specifically for the schematics and the feasibility study,” the spokesperson said. Although the Kickstarter description confirms the spokesperson’s statement, several backers questioned whether they had thrown their money away, while others complained that they had never received their rewards for donating. “Fraud. I was supposed to receive a signed copy of the Abromovic Methods Exclusives DVD for $200 pledge back in 2013, and am still waiting for it. mised rewards,” said Andre Manukyan on the project’s comments page. Abramovic had hoped that the arts space, unveiled in 2012, would capture the ephemeral, transitive nature of performance art while still allowing visitors to engage with the building around them. Floor plans released by OMA show several distinct programmatic elements, including a fitness center, library, a learning center, offices and classrooms all situated around a 650-seat central performance space. Ambitious and wide-ranging in scope, the arts center would have mandated a minimum of six-hour “hard-core performance art” tours, where visitors would have surrendered their cellphones and worn white frocks while inside the building. OMA had also been set to design custom fixtures and furniture for the facility, including padded wheelchairs so that staff could ferry tired guests from one room to another. Built in 1929, the vacant theater in Hudson is owned by Abramovic and would have retained the original brick facade and column-flanked entryway under OMA’s proposal.Unused and abandoned, the former community theater now sits unmaintained. Abramovic has told the Post that the building would be put up for sale, with a portion of the proceeds going towards paying off the unpaid school taxes the artist owes for the property.
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4,765 Hugs in Store for Supporters of Successfully Funded Marina Abramović Institute Kickstarter

Marina Abramović owes 4,765 hugs to the supporters of her successfully funded $600,000 Kickstarter. Last month, the artist launched the online campaign to fund her own Marina Abramović Institute (MAI) in upstate New York, a performance center conceptualized as a laboratory that will be dedicated to the practice of long-durational performance art and the “Marina Abramović Method.” Project donations ranged from $1 to $10,000 and all donors are invited to receive a personal hug from the artist in a future performance event called “The Embrace.” With help from social media, celebrity interest, and a few encouragements from Abramović herself, the center surpassed its goal by more than $60,000 before the end of its month-long funding period this past Sunday. Designed by OMA’s Rem Koolhaas and Shohei Shigematsu, the center’s focus is the large hall where Abramović and other performance artists will show six-hour art pieces to an audience donning lab coats. Contracted to stay for the duration, visitors will be trained in the Marina Abramović Method, being led through a variety of sensory exercises in rooms surrounding the great theater space. A few weeks ago, a viral video of pop singer Lady Gaga practicing the Method in the nude raised interest in the MAI campaign. Last month, rapper Jay-Z’s recent six-hour performance of “Picasso Baby” at Pace Gallery in New York City paid homage to Abramović’s 2010 The Artist is Present performance at the Museum of Modern Art. Even the artist herself posted a playful clip, explaining how many long durational performance artists it takes to screw in a lightbulb. With celebrity support and interest generated through Abramović's #whyMAI blog and Reddit Q&A sessions, this unique vision is now on course to be realized. Overall, the Kickstarter campaign raised $661,452 and MAI became the largest cultural institution to be funded in this way. Soon, OMA will begin to transform a 29,000-square-foot former theater in Hudson, New York, into an institute devoted solely to long durational performance art, definitely the first of its kind.