Posts tagged with "Lectures":

AN picks must-see West Coast lectures for the fall

As the fall semester kicks into gear, institutions across the west coast have begun publishing their event and lecture series offerings.  Generally speaking, west coast schools have a reputation for being more open-minded and accessible than their eastern counterparts, conditions that often allow young and emerging faculty and designers to thrive. This focus on newness carries over to the lectures and events these institutions put on, which often showcase emerging designers as well as rising international firms. This fall is no different. The region will play host to diverse practices from far and wide, including Salvador Macías and Magui Peredo of Guadalajara, Mexico-based Macías Peredo, Walter Hood of Oakland, California-based Hood Design Studio, and Aurélie Hachez of Brussels, Belgium-based Aurelie Hachez Architecte among many others.   Southern California Institute of Architecture  Alisa Andrasek, director, Wonderlab Wednesday, September 19 Michael Meredith, principal, MOS Architects, Wednesday, October 3 Aurélie Hachez, principal, Aurélie Hachez Architecte Wednesday, November 7   University of California, Berkeley Molly Wright Steenson, senior associate dean for research, Carnegie Mellon University Architectural Intelligence Wednesday, September 12 Jack Halberstam, professor of gender studies and English, Columbia University Unbuilding Gender: Trans* Anarchitectures In and Beyond the Work of Gordon Matta-Clark Wednesday, October 3 Takaharu Tezuka, president of Tezuka Architects Nostalgic Future Monday, October 15   University of California, Los Angeles Dana Cuff, urbanist and architectural theorist; Andrea Ghez, astronomer; Rodrigo Valenzuela, artist; Paul Weiss, nanoscientist What is Space? Tuesday, October 2 Susan Foster, choreographer and scholar; Jennifer Jay, environmental engineer; Tracy Johnson, molecular, cellular and developmental biologist; Greg Lynn, architect What is Body? Tuesday, November 6 Catherine Opie, artist; Willem Henri Lucas, designer; Abel Valenzuela, labor and immigration expert; Alfred Osborne, global economy and entrepreneurship expert What is Work? Tuesday, November 20   University of Southern California Andrew Watts and Yasmin Watts, CEO and CFO, Newtecnic Wednesday, October 3 Walter Hood, principal, Hood Design Studio Wednesday, October 10 Amanda Williams, principal, Amanda Williams Studio Wednesday, October 24   University of Washington College of Built Environments, Department of Architecture Salvador Macías and Magui Peredo, principals, Macías Peredo Wednesday, October 10 Anda French, principal, French 2D Wednesday, October 24 Lene Tranberg, partner, Lundgaard & Tranberg Wednesday, November 14   Woodbury University Andrew Kovacs, principal, Office Kovacs Friday, October 5 Carmelia Chiang, principal, Carmelia Chiang Architecture Friday, October 26 Four Ecologies Panel Discussion: Bruce Appleyard, planner; Margaret Noble, artist; Colleen Emmenegger, academic; Hector Perez, architect; Bruna Mori, author; Moderated by Rebecca Webb Sunday, November 11

AN picks the best of the fall’s East Coast architecture school lectures

With summer coming to a close, it’s back to school for many architecture students. The start of the semester also marks the beginning of the fall lecture circuit, a highlight of architectural education in the U.S. and a chance for young designers to learn from the field's most influential people. This season's crop yields an array of thinkers and designers from a variety of fields, from cinematography to tech, and tackles questions about how architecture and architects can take on the challenges of today's turbulent political climate. Traditional bold-faced names are often eschewed in favor of younger provocative talents reshaping the profession. But lectures aren't only for academics. Many are free and open to the public, so we’re surveying the schedules of several schools on the East Coast and hand selecting certain events you won’t want to miss—even if your student days are long gone. Put these nights on your calendars now before the season ends.   Yale University YSOA Anab Jain, co-founder and director of Superflux "Other Worlds Are Possible" Thursday, September 6 Georgeen Theodore and Tobias Armborst, Interboro Partners "Oh, the Places You’ll Go!" Thursday, September 20 Omar Gandhi "Defining a Process" Thursday, September 27 Columbia University GSAAP Evan Sharp, co-founder of Pinterest Friday, September 7 Lyndon Neri and Rossana Hu, co-founders of Neri&Hu Monday, October 8 Elizabeth Timme and Helen Leung, co-founders of LA-Más November 8 Cornell University AAP Virginia San Fratello: Printing Architecture Wednesday, September 26 Eyal Weizman: Forensic Architecture: Counter Investigations Wednesday, October 10 Dorte Mandrup: Conditions Wednesday, November 7 University of Pennsylvania School of Design Designing the Political Landscape: Activism + Design in the Trump Era Thursday, August 30 Jennifer Newsom & Tom Carruthers, Dream the Combine Wednesday, September 12 Donna Graves: Learning from LGBTQ Places: Thoughts on Heritage and Preservation Tuesday, September 25 Harvard University GSD Hannah Beachler, Black Panther production designer, with Jacqueline Stewart Thursday, October 4 Christopher Hawthorne, L.A. Chief Design Officer Tuesday, October 9 Sou Fujimoto Wednesday, October 11 A few universities haven’t publicly posted their fall lecture series yet so stay tuned as we update this page. Also, don’t forget to pick up a copy of The Architect’s Newspaper in print for our September calendar of events and lectures to check out throughout the country.

Chicago Architecture Biennial releases full list of public programs and events

Get out your calendars. As The Chicago Architecture Biennial draws near to its October 3 debut, the festival's organizers have released a list of events and public programs that should help fill out your social schedule into December. You can peruse the whole list of events on the biennial's website. Features include lectures by Pritzker Prize–winning architects (like Thom Mayne); tours of Frank Lloyd Wright's SC Johnson Campus (which just opened for tours for the first time since its construction in 1950); and a film series exploring "architecture through the lens of cinema." The full list of biennial participants was released last month.

City College’s Spitzer School of Architecture to Broadcast Lectures Online

One of the most important components of any architecture school is its semester-long lecture series. It's a chance for schools to bring in voices from outside their building and communicate to students a broad range of approaches and ideas percolating in the culture and profession. Many schools send out posters of these lectures to other schools across the country to announce their programing and these are posted on hallway walls for all to see even if they are thousands of miles away on another coast. But now City College of New York's Spitzer School of Architecture has taken the next step and is simulcasting its lectures live online for the public to view. Old lectures will be archived and viewable any time. This semester City College is focusing its lectures on Rethinking Kahn and have scheduled a distinguished line up of Louis Kahn scholars including Stanislaus von Moos this Thursday, February 28 speaking on Kahn’s urban projects. On March 7, Ken Frampton will be speaking on monumentality in Kahn’s work. March 21 will feature Gina Pollara who will lecture on New York's FDR Memorial on Roosevelt Island and its construction. After that Robert Twombley and William J.R. Curtis will lecture. On the Friday after William Curtis’ lecture, there will be a discussion between William Curtis and George Ranalli and Rethinking Kahn.

Wednesday! The Institute as the Women Saw It

Courtesy Author House Publishing Wednesday night at Van Alen Institute, AN’s own Julie Iovine will moderate a panel discussion on the Institute for Architecture and Urban Studies. The IAUS, at first affiliated with the MoMA and Cornell University, was dedicated to research, education, and discourse on architecture and urbanism. Artists, architects, and historians collaborated on projects that would shape architectural discourse for decades—Koolhaas’ Delirious New York was born out of his time at the Institute. The discussion will center on Suzanne Frank’s new book IAUS: An Insider's Memoir, with fellow Institute alumni Diana Agrest, Suzanne Stephens, and Frederieke Taylor.

Pratt Lectures on Architecture and Planning

If you’re an architect interested urban planning issues or a city planner interested contemporary architecture relationship to the city this is a lecture series for you! Created and organized by the Pratt Institute’s Program for Sustainable Planning and Development features planners and architects engaged in rethinking contemporary Preservation, sustainability, and urban design. Invited lectures include; Jirge Rigau a Puerto Rican preservationist, Andrew Genn project director of New York’s comprehensive waterfront plan and a young Mississippi architect Whitney Grant who founded the Jackson Community Development Center. They will all be addressing the fundamental questions facing today’s cites and attendees will be encouraged to ask questions of the lecturers. It takes place in room 213 of Pratt’s Manhattan campus at 144 West 14th Street and it starts with drinks at 5:30. The lectures are free and open to the public. SUSTAINABLE WATERFRONT Andrew Glen Waterfront Action Plan; Maritime and Industrial Uses and Areas February 25, 2011 Mike Marrella Vision 2020 Comprehensive Waterfront Plan April 1, 2011 Alan Belensz New York State Climate Action Plan April 29, 2011 PRESERVATION: A GLOBAL STORY Jorge Rigau The Problems of Preserving Paradise March 4, 2011 Castern Paludan-Müller Cultural Heritage: Roots, Relations, Rationales, Rights, Redemption April 8, 2011 VISIONARY URBAN DESIGN Jonathan Kirschenfeld Typologies of Social Engagement March 11, 2011 Paul Guzzardo New Ways to Smear the Street with Our Extended Epistemology March 3, 2011* Whitney Grant Suspended Mid-City March 25, 2011 Aaron Levy Redefining Artistic Advocacy April 15, 2011

Archi-Tron

As architecture grows more technical and technologically dependent, it can become harder for designers to navigate the sea of new programs and computer code. Columbia University GSAPP professor David Benjamin is here to help, offering a panel discussion Monday night about the future of computing and design, “Post Parametric 2: Demo.” The program is the second event in a series that brings expert programmers and researchers together, providing a unique opportunity for architects to learn from people outside their profession. “The first event last fall, "Post Parametric 1: Data," focused on how our new era of massive data might affect computing and design,” Benjamin said in an email. “Monday’s event involves five innovators demonstrating new technologies and speculating on the future directions for computing and design.” The event, which is co-sponsored by the Columbia Department of Computer Science, aims to enliven dialogue about the relationship between computation and design. Benjamin believes that by creating a sustained discussion about issues of technology, a complex, insightful dialogue will develop. The subject matter of the discussion will address current technologies but will primarily look to the future by bringing upcoming innovations to the table. “By future, I mean near future,” Benjamin said. “The series addresses how we might be designing in architecture in ten years.”

Shovel Oh So Ready

Architect and friend of AN Jeremiah Joseph writes in with this report of the March 27 WORKac lecture, "Shovel Ready," at Parsons. Amale Andraos and Dan Wood, of the 2008 PS1 Warm-Up pavilion fame, tag team presented their work to a standing room only crowd. With a range of projects, from buildings to urban proposals, the duo showed the office's penchant for both intelligence and wit. Like many young offices most of WORKac's work is still in the realm of unbuilt projects, but with five competitions already completed in 2009 this office has no intention of waiting around casually for the work to knock on their door. Of the work presented, two New York buildings showed off the office's intelligent concepts executed through reduced forms. They push the ideas, but are careful to not allow overly exuberant design blur the intent of their work. The Headquarters' for Diane von Furstenberg in the Meatpacking district showed their aptitude for laying out simple concepts that are translated, quite directly, into built reality. The project uses the stair, one of the most commonplace and yet ceaselessly studied elements in architecture, to turn what could be a mundane office building into an object of both clarity and poetry. Starting at the ground floor entry the stair slips up through the old warehouse building to reveal in single moment the sky above. A relatively simple move, but deftly handled, it flips the reading of the building's dark brick exterior by lighting the interior and yet at the same moment pulls visitors sense of the space up, through, and out the roof. In their proposal for the Kew Gardens Library in Queens (a project soon to start construction) WORK ac inverts the interior methods of the Diane von Furstenberg HQ by wrapping an existing building with a new facade and roof. Expanding the building's footprint towards the street they apply a new double-bent gull wing roof covered with flora. The new form, boosting the height of the building and allowing clerestory lighting into the interior, is clad at the upper portion of the facade with pre-cast concrete panels and new, open curtain wall down to the street. It is important to credit New York City's Design and Construction Excellence program for allowing WORK ac produce a project like this. It may be a bit self-serving to suggest this project gives hope to the architecture community that it will be able to continue producing good/smart/important work during a time of economic turbulence. But with the likely (and potentially healthy) collapse of the opulent condo market, the program sends a positive message to the community-at-large that quality design benefits everyone, not just the wealthy few. Of the work shown it was interesting to see that to date WORK ac is strongest in their urban proposals. The Green Belt City competition for Las Vegas started off with clear-minded analysis of the site issues. By the middle of the presentation they revealed their OMA pedigree, a tendency to tackle problems as the witty prankster who actually does know best. Yet at the end they zoom past overly reduced forms and slight of hand design moves to produce something both smart and beautiful. With their final project, a preview of a competition yet to be made public, they showed an amusing foray into the world of paper architecture. The project, a tower in lower Manhattan, was commissioned as a real world study of an urban condition, but the architects believe they, the client, and the architecture community are best served by going for broke. With an appropriate suspension of disbelief they stack and pin-wheel a series of slabs composed of archetypal sections of the city's urban fabric onto a hyper-eco-energy-friendly core. Although little of this piece itself is feasible, WORK ac likeably reveals untapped potentials in tower design and brings to light the potential for subtler, real-world solutions that would be just as relevant and powerful. With the amount of work produced so far it is a good bet WORKac will continue to generate engaging architecture. A risk the office faces is becoming typecast as new eco-architects. Although this may help bring attention, and put work on their boards, it would be too narrow of a category for their talent. An exhibition on WORKac is on view at Parsons The New School for Design, 25 East 13 Street, Second Floor, through April 18. A second exhibition, called 49 Cities, will be on view at the Storefront for Art and Architecture, 97 Kenmare Street, starting on April 14.

Talk Around the Clock

Philippe Parreno, Marquee Guggeneim, NY, 2008. Photo: Kristopher McKay/Guggenheim Foundation
Listen up insomniacs and coffee snobs, the Guggenheim is hosting a 24-hour talk, appropriately on the theme of time, as a companion to the exhibition theanyspacewhatever. The event starts at 6:00 pm tonight and runs through 6:00 pm on Wednesday, and includes artists, designers, curators, social scientists, philosophers, and others. Among those who will be taking up time and space are architectural theorist Sanford Kwinter (8:10 pm, Tuesday), designer/artist Vito Acconci (2:30 am, Wednesday), and architects Marc Kushner (5:00 am, Wednesday), Florian Idenburg (9:00 am, Wednesday), Thomas Leeser (12:00 pm, Wednesday), Makram El-Kadi (2:30 pm, Wednesday), and Lebbeus Woods (4:00 pm, Wednesday).
Carsten Holler, Revolving Hotel Room, 2008. Photo: David Heald/Guggenheim Foundation
Click here for a full line-up of speakers. To keep the conversation going, Illycaffé is providing free coffee!
Jorge Pardo, Sculpture Ink, 2008. Photo: Kristopher McKay/Guggenheim Foundation

Sachs on Sustainability

Jeffrey Sachs, the charismatic director of the Columbia University Earth Institute, gave a moving speech last night at the Graduate School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation on the environmental problems that are unique to our time. Sachs, free-market economist turned green evangelist and a special adviser to United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon, spoke on the objectives of the Institute: ending extreme poverty, maintaining the health of the ecosystem, promoting peace and shared prosperity, and advancing humanist aesthetics. Personally, it made me feel like we are at a point where each of our actions counts, especially in our role as architects, designers, and planners. Technology has allowed us to sew great damage, but it may also enable us to heal the planet. Much of Sachs’s talk dealt with what he calls “eco-tectonics,” that is the changing economic plates. The rise of Asia, or the “rise of the rest” as Fareed Zakaria calls it in The Post-American World, enabled by the new technological capacity of developing countries, is not only accelerating the human impact on the environment, but filling in power gaps. Using the current financial crisis as an example, Sachs explained how everything can go wrong in a world in which we don’t fully comprehend the interactions of the different mechanisms at play, were interconnectedness is playing a stronger role than ever, and chain reactions make local problems global. When he pointed out that the presidential campaign was focused on Middle Class voters, who were decisive to win the election, and poverty issues were hardly tackled, I couldn’t help but translate it to our profession: Architecture, like politics, is focused on those able to make the commissions, and not on those who really need of clever and groundbreaking ideas delivered on a low budget. In a profession that is crowded by battles of egos, and where formally adventurous buildings compete to stand out, there is a need for deeper thought and less aimless aesthetics. We are living in a time in which technology and communications make it possible for a designer in New York to extrude a nearly ready made skyscraper in the middle of Beijing, disregarding any possible impact that it may have not only to the immediate surroundings, but also on the environment. It is a time in which the architectural profession needs to re-examine how it applies global solutions to regional contexts, and in the same way be mindful about the local affecting the big picture. What does building green truly mean? Sustainability is not just about adding solar panels to old designs and using solvent-free paints. Truly green design requires understanding the intricate social, economical and political interactions as well as the physical conditions of our cities to prepare them for the overpopulation of the future. Even though we have learned from the disasters of tabula rasa projects of the 60s and 70s, it is not a matter of romanticizing existing conditions, which is often are unacceptable, but a question of sensitive political, cultural, and aesthetic action and interaction as an essential part of responsible practice.