Posts tagged with "LARGE Architecture":

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Curvaceous tower coming to L.A.’s Wilshire Boulevard

Large Architecture, Jamison Services, and Hankey Capital have revealed new renderings for 2900 Wilshire, a mixed-use high-rise development slated to bring a 23-story tower with 644 apartments and 13,000 square feet of ground-floor commercial space the  Koreatown neighborhood in Los Angeles. Renderings for the project depict a curvaceous tower clad in floor-to-ceiling curtain walls studded with narrow vertical metal panels. The tower’s facades feature alternating and deep-set balconies along the rounded corners of the tower’s V-shaped mass. The complex is topped by a grassy rooftop amenity level and its parking podium also boasts amenities, including a swimming pool. The new renderings are an update over previously-released views that accompanied an earlier planning submittal. The updated images portray a slightly more streamlined structure with more pronounced balconies and highly-polished cladding materials. The development is slated for a site located opposite the neighborhood’s Lafayette Park and comes amid increased high-rise development in a predominantly working-class area fed by a growing public transit network. A timeline for the project has not been released.
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Details revealed for 269-foot-tall high rise in L.A.’s Koreatown

The proposal, referred to as 2900 Wilshire in the documentation and initially pitched as a 31-story tower, will contain 644 residential units, 10,000 square feet of commercial space, 5,500 square feet of restaurant space, and 1,124 parking stalls. Those parking stalls will be located in a six-story, above-ground parking podium that will also contain 724 bicycle parking spots. The project, designed by Los Angeles–based Large Architecture, will also contain 64,550 square feet of open spaces and amenities, including an expansive rooftop terrace. The new complex will be located across the street from Lafayette Park and will be but a few blocks from the Wilshire / Vermont subway stop on the city’s Purple and Red Lines, a confusing fact considering the high parking ratio for the project. Renderings included in the LADCP report indicate that the 269-foot tall, amorphous, L-shaped tower will feature rounded corners and be clad in a variegated pattern made up of glass walls and what look to be metal panels that will act as exaggerated mullions. The tower will sit atop an articulated parking and apartment podium and be set back from the street front along Wilshire Boulevard. The tower will come down to street level at the southern edge of the site, where it will meet the lot line at the sidewalk. The tower and apartments will be made up of 227 studio units, 293 one-bedroom units, and 124 two-bedroom units. The project marks another step in the steady increase in the number of high-density, large-scale mixed-use projects along the Wilshire Corridor as construction ramps up on the city’s Purple Line extension to Century City. A firm construction start date for 2900 Wilshire has not yet been announced, but the building is expected to finish construction 32 months after groundbreaking. Work on the Purple Line extension is well underway, with the first phase of the extension due to be completed in 2023.
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Hollywood is getting a new midcentury modern-inspired tower

Los Angeles—based firm LARGE Architecture and developer Related California have released a new batch of renderings for 1755 Argyle, a midcentury modern-influenced, 18-story mixed-use residential tower project in Hollywood, California. The project would bring 114 market-rate apartments, 2,100 square feet of commercial space, and a five-level, 201-stall parking garage to the fast-growing neighborhood. The tower is expected to contain a mix of studio, one-, and two-bedroom units. Plans for the tower also call for an integrated fitness center and swimming pool lounge area. Based on renderings from the firm’s website, 1755 Argyle is articulated as a striated monolith, with zigzagging floor plates projecting from the floor-to-ceiling glass curtain walls that wrap the building on all sides. These projecting floor plates give the tower an intricate, geometric appearance and are designed to function as exterior balconies for the housing units contained within. A fifth-floor terrace located above the project’s parking podium contains outdoor amenities for the tower, including a swimming pool and lounge spaces. The project is located across the street from the iconic Capitol Records building along a bustling stretch of Hollywood and near a subway stop along the region's Red Line (close to the intersection of Hollywood and Vine streets). The area has seen a boom in low-rise, wood-framed apartment blocks in recent years, but has had a hard time getting taller—and therefore, more controversial—buildings approved for construction, including the troubled Millennium Hollywood project. That project, located around the corner from 1755 Argyle, has been plagued with delays itself due to fears that its dual 39- and 35- story towers might be located above an active fault line. It is still unclear if the Millennium Hollywood project will move forward, but 1755 Argyle is currently under construction and expected to open for occupancy in 2018.
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Canstruction LA: The City’s Most Architectural Food Drive Has a Record Year

Every year at about this time, Los Angeles' design community comes together for a good cause—and a chance to show off their ingenuity working with an unusual building material. We’re talking Canstruction LA, which just wrapped its eighth outing. Like other Canstruction events nationwide, Canstruction LA invites teams of architects, engineers, builders, and designers to design and build sculptures entirely out of canned food. The 2014 competition produced an array of impressive designs and—most importantly—donated 28,551 cans of food to the Los Angeles Regional Food Bank. Canstruction LA is put on by an all-volunteer steering committee under the auspices of the Society for Design Administration. Julie D. Taylor, Hon. AIA/LA, who serves on the committee, first read about the Canstruction program in a magazine. “[I] thought, this would be great for my clients to do,” said Taylor, who is the principal of Taylor & Company, a public relations firm for creative professionals. “I called up the national organization and said, ‘Who’s doing it in LA?’ They said, ‘No one. Why don’t you do it?’” So Taylor did, and the event keeps getting better. This year’s participants donated 7,000 more pounds of food than last year’s. Because the design teams are responsible for obtaining the cans, “it’s a major commitment for the firms that contribute,” said Taylor. Participants must also agree to a set of ground rules: they’re limited in size to a 10- by 10- by 8-foot cube; they have to use nutritious food, and the labels have to stay on. The designers can use a few additional materials to hold their creations together, but the sculptures should be mostly cans. The participating teams submitted drawings to the event organizers ahead of time. “Every year I look at them and I go, ‘There’s no way they’re going to be able to do that,” said Taylor. “And every year they knock me out.” Once on site, the designers have just one all-nighter to put their sculptures together. A jury of art, architecture, and culinary experts reviews the creations and awards several prizes, including the Juror’s Favorite, Best Use of Labels, Best Meal, and Structural Ingenuity. Visitors to the exhibition of finished works can vote for a People’s Choice honoree for one dollar, with all proceeds going to the Los Angeles Regional Food Bank. This year’s Juror’s Favorite was FOOD FIGHT! by PCL Construction Services, KPFF Consulting Engineers, and Callison, a face-off between a container of french fries and an apple that reflects on Angelenos’ struggle to access nutritious foods. Best Use of Labels went to Reflecting Hunger, by Steinberg Architects, which is based on Anish Kapoor’s Cloud Gate sculpture in Chicago. CANimal Style Trio, by American Society of Civil Engineers Younger Member Forum, which imagines a health-conscious update to the classic fast-food meal, took Best Meal. The spiraling Pineapple Twist, by NBBJ and Thornton Tomasetti won both Structural Ingenuity and People’s Choice. Honorable Mention went to CAN Get some Satisfaction, a Rolling Stones-inspired challenge to hunger by LARGE Architecture and HKS Inc. Canstruction LA 2014 took place for the second time at the Farmers and Merchants Bank in downtown Los Angeles as part of the Downtown Art Walk. “Being open during the Downtown Art Walk is incredible,” said Taylor. “The number of people who go through, and the diversity of people, is fabulous, and so that’s been a really big boon. We hope to be downtown for many, many years and engage the downtown community.”