Posts tagged with "Julie Lasky":

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Event> Eventually Everything: The 2012 D-Crit Conference May 2

Eventually Everything: The 2012 D-Crit Conference Wednesday, May 2, 12:30–7:00 p.m. Visual Arts Theatre 333 West 23rd Street No charge for admission; Registration required On May 2 the School of Visual Arts Design Criticism MFA program, a.k.a. D-Crit, presents its third annual thesis conference, and this year's line-up promises to be intriguing, covering an array of subjects--"Main Street, USA and the Power of Myth," "Graphic Ornament in Interior Architecture," "Towers to Town Homes: Public Housing, Policy, and Design in the US" to "Missing the Modern Gun: Object Ethics in Collections of Design," to name a few. The list of thesis topics alone makes a statement about the possibilities of design criticism and how D-Crit aims to push its limits. To encompass this eclectic collection of research and ideas, the students invoked that ultimate master of the mash-up, Charles Eames, who once said "Eventually everything connects—people, ideas, objects..." Connecting the dots at this afternoon conference will be Julie Lasky of Change Observer, who will emcee and preside over four themed panels—Calculated Nostalgia; Working/Not Working; Speaking Surfaces; Man, Machine, and Morality—each featuring several high-profile keynotes, including media historian Stuart Ewen, Pentagram partner Michael Bierut, 2×4 founding partner Michael Rock, cultural historian Jeffrey Schnapp, and Interboro Partners principal Daniel D’Oca. Student presentations are grouped within the panels, and, lest you need further convincing, just have a look at the slick video teasers of the ten MFA candidates' upcoming talks. For more information, visit the Eventually Everything website or view the full program here. To attend, sign up for free registration, and follow @dcritconference for updates.
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Eavesdrop CA 01

TORCH BEARERS On January 5, our New York colleagues attended a wake to mourn last month’s folding of I.D. magazine, the 55-year-old trusted chronicler of design where pioneer modernist Alvin Lustig was art director and a young John Gregory Dunne was an editor before turning to novels and screenplays. The bi-coastal bash was more of a gathering of the fellowship than a farewell, with Pentagram grandee Michael Bierut and former editors Chee Pearlman and Julie Lasky hosting. Fresh from Silicon Valley, newly appointed National Design Museum director Bill Moggridge, formerly of IDEO, was also there studying local rituals. YOU WISH Hagy Belzberg’s Skyline Residence sits on a gorgeous mountaintop ridge site. But much of its architectural innovation came cheap, with off-the-shelf parts and materials. Which made us sit up and take envious notice when we heard that the house sold for an over-the-rainbow $5.6 million, according to real-estate site Redfin. Maybe that means a new generation of buyers really value good design, or it could just be more proof of the old saw: location, location, location. However, Eavesdrop wants to believe it was the book-signing party for AN editor Sam Lubell’s new book Living West (own your own copy today!) that pushed the sale over the top. After all, Steven Ehrlich, Hadrian Predock, and Jennifer Siegal showed up. GREENER PASTURES Eco-prophet Paul Kephart of landscape design firm Rana Creek, which created the much-acclaimed green roof atop Renzo Piano’s California Academy of Sciences, has had a turbulent few years. First he left his wife for an employee, throwing the small company into chaos. Then we heard the plants on the roof were turning brown, and that Kephart himself had a brush with near death. Now, Eavesdrop is glad to report that things have stabilized with the arrival of a new Baby Kephart. Take heart: Dad is definitely not the first larger-than-life personage to also have a complicated personal life. AIN’T IT GRAND? We love when planners decide to let loose with gossip-worthy statements. Last month, Paul Novak, the land planning deputy for LA County Supervisor Mike Antonovich, spouted freely to the Los Angeles Business Journal about the city’s long-stalled Grand Avenue development: “The project should be abandoned.” And he elaborated: “We need to rethink what goes on that land and how the county and city can maximize their returns. But it’s not this deal. We should probably start from scratch and issue a new request for proposals.” Meanwhile, the Grand Avenue site looks exactly the same as it has since we started the California edition three years ago. And we thought we were the ones who played fast and loose with deadlines. Send gag orders and blank slates to Eavesdrop@archpaper.com
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R.I.P., I.D.

To get a brief taste of a world short one more smart design magazine, type ID Magazine into the search field. You might get i-D with a bunch of nude blondes on the cover or id magazine at the ready to discuss transgender issues in Oregon, but you will not easily find I.D., the magazine that has covered the art of design and the design of the everyday for more than 50 years, winning five National Magazine Awards in the process. While nobody who wanted to know the new brand names in the making dared miss I.D.’s Annual Design Review every July/August (since 1954!), it was really the steady hand and sharp eye of its most formidable editors Julie Lasky and, before that, Chee Pearlman that made I.D. a force of good in design. Lasky left last February to join the website Change Observer and continue championing innovative design. The rest of us will just have to turn the page.