Posts tagged with "Jenga":

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Kohn Pedersen Fox plays Jenga with this Madison Avenue building, pulling mass away and stacking it on top

It's addition by subtraction on Madison Avenue, where Kohn Pedersen Fox (KPF) is playing real-life Jenga with a 24-story office building between East 46th and 47th streets in Midtown Manhattan. The architects are removing select floors of 380 Madison Avenue, and stacking them on top of each other to make a taller building. In all, 18 percent of the building will be removed and re-stacked, nudging the building up to 32 stories from its original 24. Amazingly, the rearranged tower, to be renamed 390 Madison Avenue, will have the same amount of square footage as its squatter self, YIMBY reports. Construction is expected to be complete by early 2017. There will be 663,419 square feet of commercial space (mostly for offices), and the first two floors will be double-height, for retailers looking for a swanky address on one of the city's most prestigious shopping streets. The current facade, 1980s dark glass, will be replaced by floor-to-ceiling clear glass panels. The video below, fashioned after an action movie trailer, shows exactly how the building gets taller and leaner. https://vimeo.com/110394303 390 Madison Avenue is not the only recent tower to get Jenga'd. Last June, Büro Ole Scheeren released plans for a residential tower in Vancouver with boxy massing. Two months later, Pritzker Prize–winning architect Eduardo Souto de Moura unveiled plans for a mixed-use tower in Washington, D.C. with a similar profile, while NBBJ's tower, announced last September, promises to topple expectations for Cleveland's skyline. Though AN did not make the comparison initially, BIG's new police station in the Bronx could fall under this emerging typology.
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Pritzker Prize winner Eduardo Souto De Moura unveils a brick-and-concrete, mixed-use building in Washington, D.C.

Pritzker Prize–winning architect Eduardo Souto de Moura has unveiled plans for his first building in the United States, a five-story, mixed-use building to be built in Washington, D.C. The Portuguese architect is working with D.C.-based development firm EastBanc on the The site, 2715 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, currently houses a small brick gas station at the intersection of two prominent streets forming an entrance to Georgetown. "This site needed to be done," stated EastBanc president and founder Andrew Lanier. "It’s the entrance of Georgetown. I think it’s one of the most important sites in the city, and it shouldn’t be a gas station.” EastBanc purchased the property for $4 million last March.   Souto de Moura faced a number of obstacles in designing the structure in his classic "neo-Miesian" style, among them the city's 130-foot height restrictions, the lot's tiny footprint, and the intent to preserve Georgetown's historic character. The building ultimately would stand 60 feet tall and include eight 2,000-square-foot residences. Souto de Moura chose red brick to blend with the materials of the historic neighborhood.   The building's blocky form takes on the appearance of shifting, stacked-up red-brick blocks with glass terraces in between, lending a "positive and negative" rhythm to the facade. The deep-set terrace windows allows more privacy for residents. "Their vision for the site has been not to make a big glass box that lights itself up," Eastbanc Vice-President Mary Mottershead said in a recent interview, "but sort of a quiet building." A 70-seat restaurant housed in a delicate glass box set in a landscaped garden slides jauntily beneath the sturdy brick-and-concrete building's ground-level cantilever. According to a local news report, the project must still make its way through the Zoning Commission and the Old Georgetown Board. A groundbreaking date has not been set.
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Ole Scheeren wants to transform Vancouver’s glass skyline with this cantilevering tower

If you took Herzog & de Meuron's so-called "Jenga Tower" in New York City and combined it with NBBJ's so-called "Jenga Tower" in Cleveland, you would have something resembling Büro Ole Scheeren's proposed residential tower in Vancouver, which, sure, kind of looks like a game of Jenga. The firm's first North America project would land at 1500 West Georgia Street in Downtown Vancouver and rise 48 stories. The tower, with its cantilevering volumes, is intended to break up the monotony of the city's glassy skyline which the firm summed up as "extrusions of generic towers that don’t engage their environment and create isolation rather than connection." To change that, the tower has a unique massing that is supposedly intended to free up space at the street level for things like a public plaza and an "amplified reinterpretation" of the site's existing water feature. Unspecified "renewable energy sources" stuck into the building's crown would provide 100 percent of the power for these public amenities, helping the building hit its LEED Platinum target. The project is still in its early days as Ole Scheeren and Francl Architecture have only recently sent a letter of inquiry to the city about the redevelopment, which is being developed by Bosa Properties. [h/t Dezeen]
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In Construction> Herzog & de Meuron’s 56 Leonard

It's impossible to look at renderings of Herzog & de Meuron’s 56 Leonard and not immediately think of Jenga, the game guaranteed to shame one unlucky partygoer for pulling the wrong piece and ruining everyone's fun. Good times! Anyway, back to 56 Leonard in New York City—the 60-story, glassy version of that nerve-wracking game. The project was first unveiled back in September 2008, at almost the exact moment the global economy started to nosedive. So, needless to say, 56 Leonard got off to a slow start. But now the tower is rising quickly and slated to open next year. Construction watcher Field Condition recently photographed the building which has passed its 40th floor and is starting to get its glassy exterior. On the building's first few floors, erratic, cantilevering balconies create that aforementioned Jenga-like effect. But on higher floors, the Jenga-ness of the building quickly fades as the balconies fall into a more conventional pattern, appearing less like bricks from the game and more like, well, balconies. This should change, though, as the building continues to rise as its most dramatic cantilevering theatrics are reserved for its tapering top.