Posts tagged with "Jean Nouvel":

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Gluckman Tang reveals Heritage Park master plan linking Gehry and Nouvel designs

New York-based Gluckman Tang Architects has released their master plan for Western Gateway Heritage State Park (Heritage Park), an integral piece of the larger redevelopment in North Adams, Massachusetts. The proposal links the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art (MASS MoCA), the restored waterfront, Main Street, and the site of Frank Gehry's future Extreme Model Railroad Museum (EMRCAM). The project is part of a larger "cultural corridor" that ultimately hopes to bring the Bilbao effect to this corner of Massachusetts. The plan breaks up Heritage Park into three distinct plazas connected by walking paths. Each area revitalizes the historic industrial buildings within while better connecting to other parts of the city. The North Plaza will contain a new amphitheater, while the Central Plaza will hold a grove of birch trees and outdoor seating. The South Plaza will help orient visitors to Gehry's railroad museum. Originally slated for a 14,000-square-foot, 19th century warehouse inside the park, the Gluckman Tang-designed EMRCAM was scrapped for a 75,000-square-foot Gehry design elsewhere. Featuring architectural dioramas by Gehry himself and Zaha Hadid, the new museum will be located across the street from the MASS MoCA. Gluckman Tang will be converting the original park building into a Museum of Time and add another 6,000 square feet, a glazed entryway and a steep butterfly roof. Other than the museum, Gluckman Tang has also proposed converting a 3,250-square-foot coal hopper into a distilling hall, complete with a new 4,000-square-foot retail space and tasting room. “In addition to improving the experience for visitors to North Adams, our master plan will enhance the central role of the city in the Cultural Corridor and its anchor institutions, the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art (Mass MoCA) and The Clark Art Institute,” said Gluckman Tang principal Richard Gluckman. One question left unanswered is how Jean Nouvel will factor into the evolution of North Adams. The French architect was reportedly in consideration to master plan the city as of last year, but news of his involvement has been scant since then. Leading the redevelopment initiative and museum complex is Thomas Krens, former director of the Guggenheim Foundation. Krens has a storied history with Nouvel, and it seems the architect’s ideas will make it into the master plan in one way or another.
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Jean Nouvel’s Louvre Abu Dhabi opens to the public after a decade

After more than four years of construction, Jean Nouvel’s Louvre Abu Dhabi will finally open to the public on November 11. Images of the ambitious project, spanned by a 262-foot latticed, double-skinned dome, have been released for the first time ahead of the full opening. Joining Frank Gehry’s troubled Guggenheim Abu Dhabi and museum projects by Zaha Hadid, Tadao Ando and other big name studios, Nouvel’s Louvre is the first completed building on the Saadiyat Island Cultural District. The French architect expressed hope that the museum, sited on the wetland island’s coast, would pay respect to the surrounding environment as well as the cultural history of both France and the United Arab Emirates (UAE). “The Louvre Abu Dhabi becomes the final destination of an urban promenade, a garden on the coast, a cool haven, a shelter of light during the day and evening, its aesthetic consistent with its role as a sanctuary for the most precious works of art,” said Nouvel. Referencing Arab architectural traditions, the project’s radiating dome is composed of nearly 8,000 interlocking metal octagons layered over each other to form a perforated shading system. Shading visitors during the day and shining from below at night, Nouvel called the roof “an oasis of light.” Protected from the elements, the public spaces below will host a rotating selection of pieces specifically commissioned for the museum. Layering patterned partitions is nothing new for Nouvel, whose Burj Doha in Qatar similarly took advantage of the mashrabiya, an Islamic screen designed to keep occupants cool during the summer months. The galleries themselves are a collection of squat, white cubic volumes with ceiling heights that vary from room to room and an irregularly-spaced paneling design that permeates inside to the display areas. This “museum city” totals 23 gallery spaces across 6,400 square meters (21,000 square feet), as well as a children’s museum, auditorium, restaurant and merchandise shops. The floor tiling calls back to Ottoman-era mosaic design, including a “stone carpet” in one of the gallery spaces. The museum's first exhibition, From One Louvre to Another: Opening a Museum for Everyone, will open on December 21st and display 18th century artwork from the opening of the original Musée du Louvre in Paris alongside modern pieces.
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Rendering LOL: How architects are absurdly using Calder sculptures

Why do so many architects use Alexander Calder sculptures in their renderings, even when the works have nothing to do with the institution or project depicted? The Calder Foundation has been tracking this phenomenon, and the results are featured in the slideshow above.  A new exhibition at the Whitney Museum in New York explores mobiles—kinetic sculptures in which carefully balanced components reveal their own unique systems of movement—created by American sculptor Alexander Calder from 1930 until 1968, eight years before his death. Running through October 23, the exhibition features almost 40 sculptures, including three that served as models for possible architectural commissions. In addition, Alexander S. C. Rower, who is the sculptor’s grandson and head of the Calder Foundation, will bring one of three motorized maquettes Calder created as proposals for the 1939 New York World’s Fair to the Whitney later this summer for a temporary viewing and activation.
Other Calder works on display that were designed for architectural projects include Octopus and The Helices, both made in 1944 as part of a series of bronze works Calder envisioned as 40-foot monuments and created for an International Style architectural project proposed by Wallace K. Harrison. Interestingly, more recently, many well-established architects have used Calder’s works to illustrate renderings of their own designs, often without the Calder Foundation’s permission. OMA in particular apparently finds Calder’s sculptures perfect for its projects: It used his 1973 Crinkly with a Red Disc, actually in the collection of the Kunstmuseum Stuttgart, in Germany, in its rendering of the Garage Center for Contemporary Culture in Moscow. The rendering for the firm’s Park Grove condos in Miami pilfered Calder’s 1973 Flamingo, which actually sits in Federal Plaza in Chicago, while the rendering for 11th Street Bridge Park in Washington, D.C., by OMA and OLIN, features the same sculpture. Other architectural firms that favor Calder’s works in their renderings include Ateliers Jean Nouvel, whose 53 W. 53rd Street project in Manhattan features Calder’s 1961 Sumac, actually in a private collection. Shigeru Ban Architects used Calder’s 1971 The Eagle, now at the Seattle Art Museum, and his 1972 Trepied rouge et noir in renderings for, respectively, the Tainan Museum of Fine Arts in Taiwan and Mt. Fuji Shizuoka Airport in Japan. Renzo Piano Building Workshop (which designed The Whitney’s current home in Manhattan’s meatpacking district), Diller Scofidio + Renfro, SOM, and Studio Libeskind also find the display of Calder’s works an attractive way to promote their concepts. Calder’s works reside today in some major venues: In addition to the sculptures in Federal Plaza in Chicago and at the Seattle Art Museum, the home of his Five Swords is Storm King Art Center in New Windsor, N.Y. Asked about contemporary architects’ practice of borrowing—to put it politely—images of Calder’s works to illustrate their designs, Rower said that during the artist’s lifetime, Calder was friendly with Mies van der Rohe, Josep Lluís Sert, Le Corbusier, Marcel Breuer and Wallace K. Harrison, and “frenemies” with Frank Lloyd Wright. As the first artist commissioned to make a public sculpture by the General Services Administration, he said Calder was “the obvious go-to for architects designing new buildings or plazas. Given this history, it comes as no surprise to me that, even today, he is the most prolific artist depicted in architectural renderings. His iconic vocabulary is instantly recognizable; thus, contemporary architects use his imagery to suggest the superior qualities of their projects.” “The genius of Calder’s work,” Rower added, “is that it transforms space—and our experience of it—in real time. While his great invention, the mobile, does this in an overt way—performing in front of us and literally embodying movement—Calder’s stabiles (stationary sculptures) imply movement and affect how we encounter surrounding plazas, facades or even natural landscapes. Architects intuitively understand that effect, and are excited by the prospect of how a Calder sculpture can deepen the experience of whatever space they are designing.” “As long as it’s done in a respectful way,” Rower admitted that rendering actual Calder works that have not been manipulated “is gratifying. I’m interested in Calder’s works in architectural mock-ups—allowing me to imagine his sculptures in many different settings and contexts. And it’s rewarding that Calder remains a favorite amongst architects.”
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Jean Nouvel may master plan downtown of North Adams, Massachusetts

Jean Nouvel visited western Massachusetts “about a dozen years ago for Thanksgiving” and is now being considered to master plan the downtown of North Adams. He met last Friday with North Adams Mayor Richard J. Alcombright to discuss ideas and plans for the development of the Berkshire city and said he is “intrigued and impressed by the recent developments at the Clark and Mass M0CA.” Nouvel also released the following statement: “The concept of a cultural corridor in northwest Massachusetts is unique. The existing institutions are phenomenal. The combination of elements that exists here is like no other that I know of. The landscape, the topography, the colors, and the collision of Main Street, the overpass, and the railroad lends itself to an extraordinary and precise intervention or series of interventions that would preserve the scale of the city, and build on the concentration of cultural resources in the region.” With former Guggenheim Foundation Director Thomas Krens planning a new museum complex in the town's small airport, this is a region that thinks big!
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Thomas Krens in conversation with architect Jean Nouvel at this year’s “Lunch at a Landmark”

At this year’s "Lunch at a Landmark," which took place in a historic McKim, Mead & White building in Manhattan, French architect Jean Nouvel discussed a few of his projects in New York and abroad with his friend and sometimes-collaborator, Thomas Krens, director emeritus of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation. Nouvel, who has won the most significant architecture awards in the world, such as the Pritzker Prize, the RIBA Royal Gold Medal, the Imperial Prize of Japan, and the Aga Khan award, chose the theme “CONTEXTUALITIES” as the framework by which to discuss his projects. Krens kicked off the conversation: “Architects tend to develop a personal vocabulary that can be translated to different contexts,” he said. “For example, you can easily recognize a Frank Gehry. The neat thing about Jean is that he doesn’t start with a vocabulary; he starts with a place: What is the feel about the place? Where is the place going? Is it urban? Is it historical? Is it a fresh site?” Nouvel outlined his unique approach as slides of his stunning projects were shown, including the Cartier Foundation in Paris, the Arab World Institute, Opéra Nouvel in Lyon, France, 40 Mercer, 53W53, and 100 Eleventh Avenue in New York, Jane’s Carousel in Brooklyn, the Guggenheim in Rio de Janeiro, Church of Saint Mary, and the Louvre Abu Dhabi. “If I know nothing about the situation, I don’t know why I should build one thing or another one. I think architecture is an art, but we are special artists. Artists, they can go anywhere they want and they are totally free. But you can’t go to a place and say ‘It will look like this’ and we cannot impose the same vocabulary through style. Some style is apparent—it’s not part of the formal context—but I think architecture should be unique to the situation. I think the situation for me is the history of the place, the culture, the spirit of the city, the moment in time. I think there are lots of different situations and if we make the same projects for all of these different situations, then you won’t know where you are when you travel around the world. So for me, contextuality must be the main parameter.” Nouvel credits his upbringing and architectural education for this perspective. He worked under Claude Parent in his twenties and was very involved with the French intellectualism and the Structuralist movements. In particular, Nouvel and Krens discussed the unbuilt Guggenheim in Rio de Janeiro and Nouvel’s radical decision to submerge a portion of the museum under water. Inspiration for the building, Nouvel said, stemmed from the first time he saw the city. “I arrived early in the morning and there’s the sea, which is flat, and then the city, and then the mountain. I was struck by the romance of the place and I wanted to capture the emotion of Rio de Janeiro as this fantasy landscape, to allow the museum to reflect this vision.” Nouvel feels very strongly about this approach to building as a means of keeping cities vibrant and interesting. “Every time, we must reconsider the situation anew. Sometimes, architects will reproduce projects from the past and the cities become tepid, like a pastiche of themselves. It’s horrible. The two ended their discussion with the Louvre Abu Dhabi, set to open in 2017. “The Louvre Abu Dhabi is the apotheosis of modern architecture,” Krens said. Indeed the building clearly reflects Nouvel’s unique approach: A massive, domed ceiling created from geometric shapes indicative of Arab culture creates stunning shafts of light, illuminating the art and the visitor. “To create a new situation, you have to consider that the main population will judge only what they can see, you have to consider contextuality and give back and focus on the people.”
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MIPIM 2016 Presents Winners of That Other Festival In Cannes

The Cannes Film Festival doesn't start until May 11. But for architecture enthusiasts, there's another notable event in the gorgeous city on the French Riviera: MIPIM (Le marché international des professionnels de l’immobilier). The show, which is in its 26th year, just announced the winners of its annual awards, divided into more than ten categories, and handed out not just for a project's innovative architecture, but its development characteristics. Award categories cover all types of development, from health care to hospitality to the strangely named "Best Futura Mega Project," which we're still trying to decipher. And the winners are... BEST HEALTHCARE DEVELOPMENT Queen Elizabeth University Hospital & Royal Hospital for Children Glasgow, United Kingdom Developer: Brookfield Multiplex Architect: IBI Group Client: NHS Greater Glasgow & Clyde BEST HOTEL & TOURISM RESORT JW Marriott Venice Resort & Spa Venice, Italy Developer: La Sessola Srl Architect: Matteo Thun & Partners Project Manager: Luca Colombo BEST INDUSTRIAL & LOGISTICS DEVELOPMENT ELI Beamlines Prague, Czech Republic Developer: Fyzikální ústav Akademie, věd ČR, v.v.i., Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences, Czech Republic Architect: Bogle Architects BEST INNOVATIVE GREEN BUILDING Treurenberg Brussels, Belgium Developer: AXA Investment Managers – Real Assets Architect: ASSAR ARCHITECTS Owner: AXA Belgium BEST OFFICE & BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT #CLOUD.PARIS Paris, France Developer: SFL (Société Foncière Lyonnaise) Architect: PCA Philippe Chiambaretta Architecte BEST REFURBISHED BUILDING Papillon Düsseldorf, Germany Developer: 741 Projektentwicklung GmbH Architect: Luczak Architekten & SW Häuser GmbH Other: Cadman GmbH, Hellmich Gruppe & CarLoft BEST RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT Katscha Norrköping, Sweden Developer: Ivarsson Byggnads AB Architect: Kai Wartiainen and Ingrid Reppen, arkitektur + development ab Public Authority: Norrköpings kommun BEST SHOPPING CENTRE Les Docks Village Marseille, France Developer: Constructa Urban Systems Architect: 5+1 AA Other: JP Morgan Asset Management BEST URBAN REGENERATION PROJECT Crossrail Place London, United Kingdom Developer: Canary Wharf Group Architect: Foster + Partners Engineer: Arup, Wiehag BEST FUTURA PROJECT Paradis Express Liège, Belgium Developer: Fedimmo Architect: association A2M – Jaspers-Eyers Architects – BAG Other: Bureau Lemaire, TPF engineering, D2S, Heinz Winters Atelier, Duchêne, Galère, Interbuild BEST FUTURA MEGA PROJECT DUO PARIS: Taking urban sensations to new heights Paris, France Developer: Invanhoé Cambridge Architect: Jean Nouvel Project Manager: Hines PEOPLE’S CHOICE AWARD Shanghai Tower Shanghai, China Developer: Shanghai Tower Construction & Development Co. Ltd Architect: Gensler Other: Shanghai Construction Group, Thornton Tomasetti, Cosentini Associates, SWA Group, I.DEA Ecological Solutions  
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Jean Nouvel’s vegetated Miami tower touted for its man-made lagoon

West Avenue in Miami Beach is set for a Jean Nouvel high rise surrounded by an elaborate man-made lagoon.  The tower will be covered with suspended vegetation that, at least in renderings, casts the structure in a distinctly green hue. This is Nouvel's second attempt at building in the city after his Grove Heights project lost a competition in 2013. "Monad Terrace" as the 14-story tower is known, is set to top out at 149 feet, just a hair below the city's height limit of 150 feet. Developers JDS also recruited Kobi Karp Architecture and Interior Design to work on the scheme which boasts a glass facade encircled by water and a green wall, covered in foliage on one side. Inside, the structure will hold approximately 80 residential units that will offer two–five bedroom layouts, each with views out three or four sides of the building. Topping the structure are two penthouses, each with its own private pool. To maintain privacy, reflective screens—that allow views out but obscure view in—sit in front windows, creating a staggered facade. The lagoon, however, is the complex's showpiece. Occupants can stroll up to seating in the middle and edges of the lagoon or take a dip in the swimming pool along the bay where a waterfall is planned. According to managing partner at JDS Development Group, Michael Stern, the pool will be visible from the bay. It's not all good news though. Elaborate water features may be easy on the eye, but rising sea levels are a very real threat to those along the coast on Miami's South Beach. The issue surfaced late last year when The New Yorker published findings that said the idyllic retreats of the area could be underwater in under 50 years. Nouvel's design however, looks to be high and dry. "Our design is very conscious of what is going on to changes to the streets and concerns about sea level rise," said Stern speaking to Curbed Miami. Monad Terrace will be the first building in the West Avenue vicinity to encompass the higher street level requirements. Nouvel has been inclusive of the potential disastrous surroundings in his design. Landscaping dotted around the building can absorb water, meanwhile below street-level garages can act as water-tight "bathtubs." Speaking on the matter, Stern commented that "the landscape is designed that if any salt water intruded it is tough enough to live through that event."
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If at first you don’t succeed: Jean Nouvel’s leaning towers of Paris gets planning approval after initial rejection

After an initial rejection by officials from the Paris Council, French architect Jean Nouvel has been awarded planning permission for his firm's so-called Duo Tower project on the Eastern banks of the Seine. Located in the Quartier De La Gare district of Paris, the project follows on the heels of another pyramidal tower by Herzog & De Meuron planned for the city. Since Paris has dropped its construction height limit, the project is one of the first to be jumping on the high-rise bandwagon. Taking advantage of the new lack of restrictions, the taller tower will rise to 590 feet while the lower block will reach just over 400. Nouvel's towers have been a source of controversy in the French capital. A fierce opponent of Parisian high-rises, Mayor Patrice vowed to fight the scheme earlier in the year. Speaking to Le Parisien he said "I will attack this permit with a gracious solution." Unimpressed with the towers winning planning approval, he went to on to say, "the permit/license of construction was validated on the basis of a grossly false photomontage," arguing that the renders did not accurately portray the visual effect the building would have on the skyline. Touted to cost over $570 million, the mixed-use towers will provide over one million square feet—about 24 acres—of office space, and include a hotel, auditorium, restaurant, and retail area. Of this space, some will be accessible to the public with the restaurant offering views over Paris and along the river. Construction is set to begin next year with the project aiming to be complete by 2020.
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Lucky Seven: See how seven famous architects rethought Arne Jacobsen’s Series 7 Chair

In observance of the 60th anniversary of the Series 7 chair, furniture manufacturer Fritz Hansen enlisted seven architects to re-envision the classic Arne Jacobsen design. Explaining the impetus behind the program, Jacob Holm, CEO of Fritz Hansen, said, "If we fall asleep on top of our heritage, design becomes museum items. And if that happens, it (design) no longer adds new value to the present time." The participating firms—BIG, Snøhetta, Zaha Hadid, Jean Nouvel, Neri & Hu, Jun Igarashi, and Carlos Ott in association with Carlos Ponce de Léon—certainly created some eye-opening interpretations of the chair. The architects' comments on their designs reveal their inspirations and intentions. Bjarke Ingels Group "The inspiration for the design is the materiality of the chair, the essence of the layered veneer and the functionality of the stacking. The final result is a subtle repetition of the iconic form language." Neri & Hu Design & Research Office "The idea of a replica, a re-edition, hinges on the duality between the original and the re-design. Our take on this project is to embrace this exact idea of duality and create an actual 'double'. The doubling of two original seats facing each other becomes the new version: The singular chair multiplied as the individual becomes a community. Reminding us that we are never alone, but always together." Jean Nouvel Design "Our chair is an example of Jean Nouvel's design signatures: contrasting colors and juxtapositions. Black and white mark each chair—although they still play together in a feminine and masculine flow. Creating a reinforcement of the curves of the front and of the back of the shell." Zaha Hadid "The provision for this chair was to create a harmonic transition from the existing shell and how it can effortlessly touch down on the ground. This special edition formalizes the Series 7 chair as a dynamic and seamless expression of structure and support. Formed from two continuous steel rods, the sculptural base sweeps down to the ground and reaches up to embrace the undulating shape of the iconic plywood seat." Jun Igarashi Architects "When buildings collapse during earthquakes, the building materials are wasted. Our idea is to collect the waste wood, introduce a color and process it into boards that can be used for furniture." Carlos Ott Architects in association with Carlos Ponce de Léon Architects "The chairs have been intervened the same way a vertical garden grows organically up a wall. The upholstery climbs and settles peacefully on the shell of the chair. The curved lines which compose the foundation of the different areas in the garden are mimicked and adapted to the anatomy of the chair". Snøhetta "We nurture differences. When opposites meets, they conjure an interesting dialogue. When nature meets the cultivated, when humans interact with architecture, when soft and hard co-exist—interesting things happen. "Maybe the Series 7 chair with its metal legs and wooden seat acknowledges this juxtaposition. We wanted to explore the soft side of the chair. "The wood is a representation of softness in contrast to metal. A legless construction is free and indeterminate. It is versatile and simple. And maybe it can be a symbol for social interaction and playfulness. If we add even more softness to it we might be able to create a new user experience, additional functionality. We want it to be a multifunctional social tool in both singular and plural contexts. You can sit in any formation dictated by any social scene you are in. It can be a singular, free, soft chair or a plural one in a fixed social situation." The chairs will travel to design festivals in London, Copenhagen, and Gent, Belgium before being auctioned to benefit UNICEF.
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Court reverses decision on French architect Jean Nouvel’s lawsuit against the Philharmonie de Paris

Celebrated French architect Jean Nouvel lost a court case in which he sued the Philharmonie de Paris for removal of his name from the project due to major deviations from his original design. The court, which ruled in his favor on April 16 pending “additional detailed and comparative information,” reversed its decision hours later. The jury alleges that Nouvel failed to provide incriminating documentation to justify his claim that 26 parts of the 2,400-seat auditorium, whose January 15 inauguration he boycotted, had strayed from his design. These key elements include parapets, foyers, facades, promenades, and acoustic elements of the performance hall. The court said the documents he provided "do not allow the court to assess the work asked for in its definitive state, both globally and in detail," and the court was thus unable to rule whether the work had been "adulterated.” Nouvel also sued on the grounds that his firm, Ateliers Jean Nouvel, was not liable for the nearly doubled costs due to delays and allegedly radical departure from the design proposal.
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The world’s “best tall building” is Jean Nouvel’s high-rise jungle in Sydney

The Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) last night named Atelier Jean Nouvel's One Central Park (OCP) in Sydney the year's best tall building. OCP turned the site of a former brewery into a residential high-rise lush with hydroponic hanging gardens and a massive mirror cantilevered over the building's courtyard that harvests sunlight for heat and lighting year-round. One Central Park, considered the world's tallest vertical garden, bested projects from SOM, OMA, and Cutler Anderson Architects for the award. Those buildings—a twisting tower in Dubai, a melded mass of high-rises, and a midcentury office tower reborn as a green icon—each won regional awards from CTBUH. But One Central Park's use of greenery by botantist and green wall guru Patrick Blanc won the day. “Seeing this project for the first time stopped me dead,” said juror and CTBUH Executive Director Antony Wood. “There have been major advances in the incorporation of greenery in high-rise buildings over the past few years—but nothing on the scale of this building has been attempted or achieved.” Accepting the award in Chicago on behalf of his firm, Atliers Jean Nouvel Partner Bertram Beissel said the project increases the visibility of sustainable design. "If we do all these sustainable things and no one can see them, do they really exist?" Beissel said. "The choices we make for a sustainable future cannot be made in the future. They must be made today.” Read more about the building on CTBUH's website. OMA’s CCTV Tower in Beijing won last year’s competition.
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The Cinematic Future of “Dumbo Heights”

The transformation of the Jehovah’s Witness' Watchtower campus in Dumbo is underway. Real estate wunderkind Jared Kushner is converting the five-building complex into “Dumbo Heights” – Brooklyn’s next tech hub and commercial district. While the 1.2-million-square-foot project won’t open until next year, a new promotional video for the site was released this week. And it’s packed with more Brooklyn stereotypes than a Williamsburg brunch spot on Sunday. Here’s a shot-by-shot guide to the spring’s most epic real estate promotional film. It starts in complete abstraction. A scratching record and flashing light leave the viewer completely disoriented until—aha!—coordinates flash onscreen: 40.7031N, 73.9894W. But what do they mean? Where are we? They’re just numbers, none of this makes any sense. Suddenly, it all becomes clear. A sweeping, aerial shot shows us that we’ve arrived. We’ve arrived at Dumbo Heights. Or rather, some currently existing office meant to look like Dumbo Heights. Cut to a blonde 20-something marching through that office. Lights turn on as she moves through the space. She is likely some sort of celestial programmer, or celestial social media coordinator. Before we know which, she disappears. A man arrives. He is dressed in Brooklyn: a beard, a plaid shirt, and is holding a fixed-gear bike. His dog follows behind him. How did the dog get to the office so fast? Was he also on a fixed-gear? It’s the film’s first mystery. Another young professional appears wearing a bow-tie. To his left, a woman smiles below a floppy hat. They’re young. They’re fun. This is Dumbo Heights. More people. More Apple computers. More dogs. More Plaid. More Brooklyn. There is a tent set up in the middle of an office. Why is there a tent sent up in the middle of an office? And why are people meeting in it? The second great mystery. Look! That guy with the plaid and beard is back. He steps into the tent and smiles. He’s been welcomed by the group. The meeting can commence. More meetings between young professionals cuts to a recording studio, which cuts to a pug running in slow motion. Run little pug, run. "Co-creation” is written on a whiteboard by a white hand. There is an architectural rendering on a table next to a tiny cactus. And then, all of a sudden, children and horses are swinging around Jean Nouvel’s Jane's Carousel. They disappear. A bearded fellow takes their place. He's swinging a bottle of liquor behind a bar. Another bow-tied gentleman raises his chalice. “Cheers,” he seems to be saying. “Cheers to us and cheers to Dumbo Heights. Hooray!” The alcohol gives way to coffee and a latte artist dripping milk across his dark-roast canvas. A woman pulls her friend across the Brooklyn Bridge at dusk. She is squarely in the bike lane, but is this real life? More people working, smiling, and two more dogs. One is sleeping; the other is trying to lick the stubble off its owner’s face. There’s that guy in plaid again. Where is he going this time? Somewhere, and he’s moving fast. A sweeping shot of Dumbo, and—you cannot be serious—a typewriter. What is it writing? Dumbo Heights. Fin. [h/t New York Daily News]