Posts tagged with "JE Berkowitz":

Placeholder Alt Text

Product>Don’t Forget to Gloss

New developments in technology and updates to customizable options for façade products are allowing for countless ways to make an outstanding first impression. Dekton XGLOSS Cosentino

The XGLOSS series is an incredibly resilient high-gloss surface that is suitable for both interior and facade treatments. Nanotechnology lends Dekton’s new colors their luxuriously shiny finish. The five new color options are available in large format slabs in three different thickness options.

  Translucent Color Portfolio 3Form

3form has expanded its range of translucent color panels to offer 250 options that can be layered with different colors and textures to allow for infinite combinations. The colors can be applied to any of five material options including resin, polycarbonate, glass, recycled acrylic, and recycled resin.

Krion Porcelanosa

This exterior wall cladding system is particularly useful against adverse weather conditions, and the development of advanced fixing systems allows Krion to be used in ventilated facades. In addition, it can be thermoformed to create different curves, shapes, or textures. Krion is 100 percent recyclable, and made of an ecological material that is available in a wide range of colors.


UltraClear Guardian

UltraClear glass offers maximum clarity and color neutrality, making it virtually invisible. Without the green tint of standard glass, UltraClear allows for picture-perfect views. It can be combined with low-e coatings, and is fabricated, laminated, and heat-treated like standard glass.

Trosifol Kuraray

The Diamond White PVB interlayer is a single-layer film that offers the safety of a laminated construction as well as a uniform opaqueness and highly reflective surface. The optical properties are better than that of coated or fritted glass, because the glass does not need to be tempered, which results in less optical distortion.

3Seal JE Berkowitz

Composed of a warm edge spacer, primary PIB seal, and two-part silicone secondary seal, 3Seal is robotically applied to ensure an extremely straight sightline, improve thermal performance, increase condensation resistance, promote sound attenuation, and maximize heat-flow resistance.

Placeholder Alt Text

Last Minute Learning Lab at DORMA

For those trying to earn their last minute AIA credit hours, DORMA’s Design Center is hosting two full days of accredited learning on December 9 and 10, 2014. Course titles include:
  • Operable Wall Systems
  • – Innovations in Structural Glass
  • – Omni Class
  • – Specifying Design Intent
  • – Glass Fabrication and Design Issues
  • – Safety & Security Using Locks Exits, and Key Systems
  • – Interior Glass Office Front Systems
  • – High Performance Architectural Coatings
  • – Storefront Windows, Window Wall, Curtain Wall – What’s the Difference?
  • – Automatic and Revolving Doors
  • – Sustainability
  • – Architectural Glass and Resin Panels, Materials, and Configurations
Speakers will include industry professionals from Conspectus, Gensler, JE Berkowitz, Pilkington, HLW Architects, Lumivisions, and DORMA. You won’t want to miss it! For more information, email designctr@dorma-usa.com or call 917-880-6533. Located centrally in New York City, The DORMA Design Center provides accredited continuing education programs, instructional sessions, product and service introductions, consultations, and additional events serving the design community. Click for Full Calendar of events and AIA approved courses
Placeholder Alt Text

Transparency by Design: Weiss/Manfredi’s Nanotechnology Center

Multiple layers of glass combine with corrugated metal panels to balance visibility and privacy in the University of Pennsylvania's new research center.

As an experiment in interdisciplinary research, the Krishna P. Singh Center for Nanotechnology at the University of Pennsylvania is not a typical science center. It follows, then, that the university would not want a typical laboratory building, with a central corridor and minimal public space. Instead, the University of Pennsylvania asked Weiss/Manfredi to design the Singh Center around two principles. First, the building should create a new campus green for the school of engineering and applied sciences, in keeping with both the university’s and the city’s tradition of building around open quads. Second, the building should maximize natural light and visibility without compromising the integrity of the research itself. The most outstanding feature of Weiss/Manfredi’s design is the multi-layered glass curtain wall on the Walnut Street side of the building, which was designed with facade consultant Heintges and installed by National Glass & Metal Company. The outermost layer of glass, Guardian SunGuard AG 50 low-E on UltraWhite, which separates the building’s public spaces from the courtyard, achieves transparency while minimizing solar heat gain (the building is on track to achieve LEED Gold certification). It comprises an exterior etched panel by Walker Glass Co. wedded to a reflective panel with interior frit by JE Berkowitz. The etching and frit pattern varies from one part of the building to the next, for a total of five glass pattern modules. “The idea with that pattern was that where views out are most important, it’s most transparent,” said Weiss/Manfredi senior project architect Mike Harshman. “Where it’s more an issue of daylight, it’s more opaque.” The second layer of glass divides the Singh Center’s public spaces from its laboratory spaces. There, Weiss/Manfredi installed a laminated assembly with two layers of translucent frit. Again, the architects aimed for balance, this time between privacy and views out. Interior solar shades allow occupants to shut out daylight—or the eyes of passersby—when needed. On the first floor, an amber glass interlayer demarcates the research center’s 10,000-square-foot Bay/Chase Cleanroom. The color protects the interior of the cleanroom from ultraviolet rays and specific light wavelengths in the visible spectrum without walling it off completely. “Cleanrooms are typically a closed thing, but you can walk in and see everything going on in [there],” said Harshman. Glazed in interior fritted glass, write-up offices front the laboratories themselves, allowing light to enter the general labs. “We really saw the sections—the exterior glass, interior, and glass on [the] labs—as one assembly,” explained Harshman. The design allows daylight to penetrate deep into the building, while the combination of patterned glass and solar shades protects both the researchers and their experiments.
  • Facade Manufacturer Walker Glass Co., JE Berkowitz, LP, Vanceva, Wyatt Incorporated, Spectrum Metal Finishing, National Glass & Metal Company, Guardian Industries
  • Architects Weiss/Manfredi
  • Location Philadelphia
  • Date of Completion 2013
  • System curtain wall of etched and frit glass on AESS frame, interior laminated and frit glass, corrugated aluminum plate panels with custom reflective coating
The Singh Center facade is not all glass, however. Far from it. “From some views it looks like it’s very glassy, but the glass only represents one-third [of the building envelope],” said Harshman. “The rest is opaque and very insulated. The question became how to clad that surface.” Weiss/Manfredi explored a number of materials, including champagne-colored metal to echo the surrounding brick buildings. Ultimately the University of Pennsylvania chose silver anodized aluminum plate panels, explained Harshman, “because for them the context was technology.” The corrugated panels, which were fabricated and installed by Wyatt Incorporated with a custom finish by Spectrum Metal Finishing, were hung as a rain screen system over a prefabricated highly insulated exterior backup wall. “[There was] a great interest on Penn’s part that the project would have an aspect about scale and light. They liked the idea of the corrugated panels catching light at different times of the day,” said Harshman. The logic of the Singh Center facade culminates in the Forum, the multipurpose conference space that cantilevers over the courtyard. Its back and sides wrapped in protective metal, the Forum’s front wall is fritted glass overlooking the main campus. As a result, the place where researchers present their work is also the most connected to the university and the community around it. In the Singh Center, the University of Pennsylvania did not have to choose between openness and an effective research environment. They achieved both, with a building that turns traditional laboratory design on its head.